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even after years of CSS-ing, I couldn't find any explanation (and can't understand it myself after simple observation) as to how a percentage is calculated to pixels. To further explain:

Why does a margin-left of 2% in one div ends up being 20 pixels and in another 30 pixels? Does width play a role? In this case that would mean a wider div has a bigger margin, but from my observations it's not the case!

Check this: http://JSNAIL.IT/uLjeYSHx/ . div with class col2 is bigger than others, yet it has the same margin-right calculated. (11px)

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it's not a good article, it's w3schools. – BiAiB May 31 '12 at 10:33
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Percentage Margin of an inner element depends on the size of outer container. see for example left margin of inner div is set 20% for both examples

 _______________
|    ___        |
|20%|   |       |
|   |___|       |
|_______________|
 _______________________
|      ___              |
|20%  |   |             |
|     |___|             |
|_______________________|
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Check this: JSNAIL.IT/uLjeYSHx . div with class col2 is bigger than others, yet it has the same margin-right calculated. (11px) – George Katsanos Jun 4 '12 at 11:22
    
For the case given in the link. the container is <body> of the document, and the result is exactly as expected. because as explained in the answer above, the margin is decided on the size of the outer container. so the margin are same for all the inner boxes, irrespective of their own sizes. – Rab Nawaz Jun 4 '12 at 11:39
    
Got it! It depends on the container's size.. (weird though!) – George Katsanos Jun 4 '12 at 13:04

The percentage of margin is dependent of the relative box your scaling is in.

So if you take a percentage over the entire page it will be more then if you take it in a box with a width of say 200px.

20% in the last case will end up being 40px.

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Check this: JSNAIL.IT/uLjeYSHx . div with class col2 is bigger than others, yet it has the same margin-right calculated. (11px) – George Katsanos Jun 4 '12 at 11:20

It depends. Percentage values can have a different meaning for each attribute according to the standard (CSS2.1: 4.3.3 Percentages):

The format of a percentage value (denoted by <percentage> in this specification) is a <number> immediately followed by '%'.

Percentage values are always relative to another value, for example a length. Each property that allows percentages also defines the value to which the percentage refers. The value may be that of another property for the same element, a property for an ancestor element, or a value of the formatting context (e.g., the width of a containing block). When a percentage value is set for a property of the root element and the percentage is defined as referring to the inherited value of some property, the resultant value is the percentage times the initial value of that property.

For example margins are calculated by the width of their containing block (CSS2.1: Margin properties):

The percentage is calculated with respect to the width of the generated box's containing block. Note that this is true for 'margin-top' and 'margin-bottom' as well. If the containing block's width depends on this element, then the resulting layout is undefined in CSS 2.1.

Notice that quirksmode will mess up many things in IE since the wrong box model will be used.

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