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I have a VBA toolbar that i have been working on. It has two buttons, and near the end of the process, it calls a python script. What I want to do is depending on which of the two buttons is clicked, a certain part of the python script will run, so I want to pass a value that is linked to the button which is then sent to the python script and run.

How do I do this?

Thanks

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How do you run the Python script? Via a new process with a command line? –  Martijn Pieters May 31 '12 at 10:27
    
Martijn, within the VBA code i have the following codeShell "C:\Python25\python.exe ""H:\Report_v7.py" –  Halil Siddique May 31 '12 at 10:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can pass command line options to the python script, just like you can with other command line programs. Depending on which button was pressed, pass different switches to your program.

In your case, it may be simplest just to pass in one value on the command line depending on the button that was pressed and pick this from the sys.argv variable:

import sys

def fooClicked():
    # Stuff to do when Foo was clicked

def barClicked():
    # Stuff to do when Bar was clicked

button = sys.argv[1]
if button == 'foo':
    fooClicked()
elif button == 'bar':
    barClicked()

(You could use a dict to look up methods but that may be too advanced, don't know how comfortable you are with Python).

So, if you call this script with python.exe H:\Report_v7.py foo the fooClicked function will be called.

If this is going to grow to more than just two buttons, I'd use the optparse module to define your options and run different code paths depending on the options chosen.

If you upgrade to Python 2.7, then use the new (better) argparse module instead.

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thanks alot, I've got it to work. –  Halil Siddique Jun 1 '12 at 9:36

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