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String s = "java";
s.substring(1); // ava

Considering the immutability of strings, compiler doesnot modify 's' but creates a new object or you can say that there is space for 'java' as well as 'ava' in memory..

What happens to this 'ava', as nothing is pointing to it or it's not being referenced by anything..

One more question... If i would have written String s = new String("java"); // 'java' is not in string literal pool....

The 'ava' would be in the string literal pool then or not ?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What happens to this 'ava', as nothing is pointing to it or it's not being referenced by anything..

The newly constructed String object immediately becomes eligible for garbage collection.

As to your second question, I don't think there's any difference between the following two expressions as far as the string literal pool is concerned:

String s = "java";
String s = new String("java");

In both cases, the literal "java" would be in the pool. (But in the second case, s would not refer to the "java" string that's in the pool, but to a different String that also has the characters "java".)

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The only strings in the literal pool are those mentioned specifically in a class file in double quotes -- "java" itself, for example -- or strings on which intern() has been called. –  Louis Wasserman May 31 '12 at 10:39
    
@LouisWasserman: Thanks for the edit. –  NPE May 31 '12 at 10:42
    
String a ="aaa"; String b = new String("aaa");----> this will create a new instance of string literal"aaa" as a separate object and put it in the pool as well with another "aaa" –  grisleyB May 31 '12 at 10:43
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@LouisWasserman: Just a clarification. Strings that result from constant expressions are in the pool. These include literal strings (e.g., "java"), and strings that are the result of other constant expressions (e.g., "ja" + "va"). But these are not the only strings in the pool. Many identifiers find their way in as well (e.g., C.class.getSimpleName().equals("C") is true). –  Nathan Ryan May 31 '12 at 11:09
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@rd4code: that's correct. One is in the pool; the other is not. Think of new String("java") as short for String s1 = "java"; String s2 = new String(s1); Then s1 is in the pool; s2 is a copy (not in the pool) of s1. –  Louis Wasserman May 31 '12 at 11:10

1) What happens to this 'ava', as nothing is pointing to it or it's not being referenced by anything..

As you have not assigned 'ava' to any object means 'ava' is not being pointed by any object so it would be eligible for garbage collection.

2) The 'ava' would be in the string literal pool then or not ?

No it would be in string  literal pool.
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String a ="aaa"; String b = new String("aaa");----> this will create a new instance of string literal"aaa" as a separate object and put it in the pool as well with another "aaa" –  grisleyB May 31 '12 at 11:05

s.substring(1) creates a new String pointing to the underlying char array of s. The important thing to realise here is that the char array is shared between these two objects. If you use the String(String) constructor a new char array is created containing the referenced characters.

If you throw away the reference to s, if you have a reference to the result of the substring() operation then you have a reference to the full underlying char array.

In your example you're not storing a reference to the newly created String. So that will be garbage-collected very quickly. The underlying array is still referenced by s, however.

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... however this must be an implementation detail, given the immutability of strings. –  Vlad May 31 '12 at 10:38

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