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I use Mocha to test my JavaScript stuff. My test file contains 5 tests. Is that possible to run a specific test (or set of tests) rather than all the tests in the file?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 85 down vote accepted

Try using mocha's --grep option:

    -g, --grep <pattern>            only run tests matching <pattern>

You can use any valid JavaScript regex as <pattern>. For instance, if we have test/mytest.js:

it('logs a', function(done) {
  console.log('a');
  done();
});

it('logs b', function(done) {
  console.log('b');
  done();
});

Then:

$ mocha -g 'logs a'

To run a single test. Note that this greps across the names of all describe(name, fn) and it(name, fn) invocations.

Consider using nested describe() calls for namespacing in order to make it easy to locate and select particular sets.

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Thanks! I was under the impression that --grep only filtered from the @ tags. –  kumar_harsh Jan 6 '14 at 15:38
    
@mikemaccana: uhm? Who's minified anything? –  Yuki Izumi Jun 11 '14 at 21:40
    
@mikemaccana: no, I'm not a human minifier, this is just how I wrote the example. You could have just fixed the problem yourself, y'know. –  Yuki Izumi Jun 12 '14 at 12:41
    
@yuki I was hoping to avoid the same thing happening in future on other Stack Overflow answers. I've fixed this particular answer for you. –  mikemaccana Jun 12 '14 at 13:15
1  
When using Mocha programmatically (for example from Grunt), there's a catch: grep option needs to be a ´RegExp()´ object. If it's a string, it will be escaped. –  h-kippo Nov 21 '14 at 7:42

Depending on your usage pattern, you might just like to use only. We use the TDD style; it looks like this:

test.only('Date part of valid Partition Key', function (done) {
    //...
}

Only this test will run from all the files/suites.

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2  
BDD works the same. This is great for when you are working on a single test. It can also be used at the suite/describe level –  andyzinsser Jul 19 '13 at 2:14

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