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Is there any difference between “foo is None” and “foo == None”?

Quite a simple question really.

Whats the difference between:

if a.b is 'something':

and

if a.b == 'something':

excuse my ignorance

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marked as duplicate by Sven Marnach, Martijn Pieters, Duncan, Alasdair, senderle May 31 '12 at 11:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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When you realize a question is simple, it is a sure bet there probably already is an answer on SO.. –  Martijn Pieters May 31 '12 at 11:04
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The first checks for identity the second for equality.

Examples:

The first operation using is may or may not result in True based on where these items, i.e., strings, are stored in memory.

a='this is a very long string'
b='this is a very long string'

a is b
False

Checking, id() shows them stored at different locations.

id(a)
62751232

id(b)
62664432

The second operation (==) will give True since the strings are equal.

a == b
True

Another example showing that is can be True or False (compare with the first example), but == works the way we'd expect:

'3' is '3'
True

this implies that both of these short literals were stored in the same memory location unlike the two longer strings in the example above.

'3' == '3'
True

No surprise here, what we would have expected.

I believe is uses id() to determine if the same objects in memory are referred to (see @SvenMarnach comment below for more details)

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"I believe is uses id() to determine if the same objects in memory are referred to." Not exactly -- is simply compares the pointers. In the CPython implementation, id() returns the pointer as an integer, so this will be equivalent. –  Sven Marnach May 31 '12 at 11:18
    
@SvenMarnach Thanks Sven, I'll update my answer to point to your comment. –  Levon May 31 '12 at 11:20
    
I've only ever used is in if a.b is None context. Any other example of when you could use it (e.g. would you use it to compare object instances?) –  Sevenearths May 31 '12 at 12:00
    
Sorry I got my answer from the duplicate :) –  Sevenearths May 31 '12 at 12:02
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a is b is true if a and b are the same object. They can compare equal, but be different objects, eg:

>>> a = [1, 2]
>>> b = [1, 2]
>>> c = b
>>> a is b
False
>>> a is c
False
>>> b is c
True
>>> a == b == c
True
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