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Several times I've read that unpack() is faster than substr(), especially as the number of substrings increases. However, this benchmark suggests otherwise. Is my benchmark flawed, or is the alleged performance advantage of unpack() a holdover from older versions of Perl?

use strict;
use warnings;
use Benchmark;

my ($data, $format_string, $n_substrings);

my %methods = (
    unpack => sub { return unpack $format_string, $data },
    substr => sub { return map {substr $data, $_, 1} 0 .. $n_substrings - 1 },
);

for my $exp (1 .. 5){
    $n_substrings = 10 ** $exp;
    print $n_substrings, "\n";
    $format_string = 'a1' x $n_substrings;
    $data          =   9  x $n_substrings;
    Benchmark::cmpthese -2, \%methods;
}

Output (on Windows):

10
           Rate unpack substr
unpack 131588/s     --   -52%
substr 276802/s   110%     --
100
          Rate unpack substr
unpack 13660/s     --   -57%
substr 31636/s   132%     --
1000
         Rate unpack substr
unpack 1027/s     --   -68%
substr 3166/s   208%     --
10000
         Rate unpack substr
unpack 84.4/s     --   -74%
substr  322/s   281%     --
100000
         Rate unpack substr
unpack 5.46/s     --   -82%
substr 30.1/s   452%     --

As pointed out in some answers, unpack() does poorly on Windows. Here's the output on a solaris machine -- not nearly so decisive, but substr() still wins the foot race:

10
           Rate unpack substr
unpack 202274/s     --    -4%
substr 210818/s     4%     --
100
          Rate unpack substr
unpack 22015/s     --    -9%
substr 24322/s    10%     --
1000
         Rate unpack substr
unpack 2259/s     --    -9%
substr 2481/s    10%     --
10000
        Rate unpack substr
unpack 225/s     --    -9%
substr 247/s     9%     --
100000
         Rate unpack substr
unpack 22.0/s     --   -10%
substr 24.4/s    11%     --
share|improve this question
2  
Nothing is faster than anything. You have to apply it to specific problem. Is a cheetah faster than a goose? Maybe over 100 meters, but not across an ocean. :) –  brian d foy Oct 20 '09 at 5:46
3  
@brian I take your point, but the comment seems off target. Here's a closer analogue: "Is a cheetah ever faster than a goose? Here's a specific example of them racing each other. Was my test biased?"? Answer: "Yes, biased. The goose was on steroids." –  FMc Oct 20 '09 at 8:37

5 Answers 5

Not to say I'm distrusting your results, but what sort of system are you running this on? I ran your script on Ubuntu 8.10 (perl 5.10) with the following results:

 mscharley@S04:~$ perl -v

This is perl, v5.10.0 built for x86_64-linux-gnu-thread-multi
 mscharley@S04:~$ ./test.pl
10
           Rate substr unpack
substr 587390/s     --   -10%
unpack 650343/s    11%     --
100
          Rate substr unpack
substr 66060/s     --    -5%
unpack 69433/s     5%     --
1000
         Rate substr unpack
substr 6847/s     --    -2%
unpack 6977/s     2%     --
10000
        Rate substr unpack
substr 683/s     --    -1%
unpack 693/s     1%     --
100000
         Rate substr unpack
substr 68.3/s     --    -0%
unpack 68.4/s     0%     --

My results from my local Windows machine (which is what I'm guessing you're using, judging from my results):

>perl -v

This is perl, v5.10.0 built for MSWin32-x86-multi-thread

>perl test.pl
10
           Rate unpack substr
unpack 125210/s     --   -50%
substr 252878/s   102%     --
100
          Rate unpack substr
unpack 12677/s     --   -56%
substr 28854/s   128%     --
1000
         Rate unpack substr
unpack  963/s     --   -66%
substr 2846/s   196%     --
10000
         Rate unpack substr
unpack 78.8/s     --   -73%
substr  291/s   269%     --
100000
         Rate unpack substr
unpack 4.88/s     --   -82%
substr 27.2/s   457%     --

If I had to take a good guess at the difference, I'd take a wild guess and say that Windows doesn't have a native pack/unpack function and so Perl has to emulate it somehow. My 2c anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent point. I added some more output. –  FMc Jul 5 '09 at 2:29
    
results on a MacBook (OSX) are similar to your Ubuntu 8.10 results... –  Massa Jul 5 '09 at 13:14
    
I get similar results on my Ubuntu 8.10. –  Brad Gilbert Jul 5 '09 at 13:46
    
Yea... I'm willing to bet the poor performance on Windows is due to a poor (or lack of) native implementation of pack/unpack... –  Matthew Scharley Jul 5 '09 at 14:00

I get similar results to the questioner under Ubuntu 9:

This is perl, v5.10.0 built for i486-linux-gnu-thread-multi
10
       Rate unpack substr
unpack 535925/s     --    -3%
substr 552749/s     3%     --
100
      Rate unpack substr
unpack 57957/s     --    -5%
substr 61264/s     6%     --
1000
     Rate unpack substr
unpack 4716/s     --   -22%
substr 6075/s    29%     --
10000
    Rate unpack substr
unpack 466/s     --   -24%
substr 609/s    31%     --
100000
     Rate unpack substr
unpack 46.3/s     --   -23%
substr 60.5/s    31%     --

But I'm not sure this is relevant. I don't tend to use unpack for simple string extractions, due to its unholy format string :-)

I think where it would shine is extracting encoded integers and all sorts of other binary information which is where I would use it.

One thing you should take from Matthew's and my (and your) benchmarks is that it will depend a lot on environmental factors. And keep in mind that speed, while good, is not the be-all and end-all - I don't think I've written much code that would be seriously affected by only being able to perform 4.6 million extractions per second rather than 6 million :-) You may need that extra performance but I doubt it for most applications written in Perl.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 in general, but especially about unpacks format string... I especially agree with you about the idea that pack/unpack is designed for binary data rather than simply taking substrings. –  Matthew Scharley Jul 5 '09 at 2:13

The test is not flawed, but it is skewed. substr is better if all you need to do is extract a fairly simple substring from a string, but thats about it. For example, even this simple task is not easily done using substr:

$foo = '123foo456789bar89012';
my ($t1,$t2,$t3,$t4,$t5) = unpack("A3A3A6A3A5",$foo);

Thats where you should see a dramatic difference between substr and unpack.

share|improve this answer

As a matter of fact, your benchmark is flawed, in a really, really interesting way, but what it boils down to is that what you are really comparing is the relative efficiency with which unpack vs. map can throw away a list, because Benchmark::cmpthese() is executing the functions in void context.

The reason your substr comes out on top is this line of code in pp_ctl.c pp_mapwhile():

if (items && gimme != G_VOID) {

i.e. perl's map magically skips a bunch of work (namely allocating storage for the results of the map) if it knows it is being called in void context!

(My hunch on the windows vs. other seen above is that windows-based perl memory allocation is awful, so skipping the allocation is a bigger savings there -- just a hunch, though, I don't have a windows box to play with. But the actual unpack implementation is straight-up C code, and shouldn't differ substantially from windows to other.)

I have three different solutions for working around this issue and generating a more fair comparison:

  1. assign the list to an array
  2. loop over the list inside the function, and return nothing
  3. return a reference to the list (hiding the void context)

Here's my version of %methods, with all three versions:

my %methods = (
    unpack_assign => sub { my @foo = unpack $format_string, $data; return },
    unpack_loop => sub { for my $foo (unpack $format_string, $data) { } },
    unpack_return_ref => sub { return [ unpack $format_string, $data ] },
    unpack_return_array => sub { return unpack $format_string, $data },

    substr_assign => sub { my @foo = map {substr $data, $_, 1} 0 .. ($n_substrings - 1) },
    substr_loop => sub { for my $foo ( map {substr $data, $_, 1} 0 .. ($n_substrings - 1)) { } },
    substr_return_ref => sub { return [ map {substr $data, $_, 1} 0 .. ($n_substrings - 1) ] },
    substr_return_array => sub { return map { substr $data, $_, 1} 0 .. ($n_substrings - 1) },
);

And my results:

$ perl -v

This is perl, v5.10.0 built for x86_64-linux-gnu-thread-multi

$ perl foo.pl
10
                        Rate substr_assign substr_return_ref substr_loop unpack_assign unpack_return_ref unpack_loop unpack_return_array substr_return_array
substr_assign       101915/s            --              -20%        -21%          -28%              -51%        -51%                -65%                -69%
substr_return_ref   127224/s           25%                --         -1%          -10%              -39%        -39%                -57%                -62%
substr_loop         128484/s           26%                1%          --           -9%              -38%        -39%                -56%                -61%
unpack_assign       141499/s           39%               11%         10%            --              -32%        -32%                -52%                -57%
unpack_return_ref   207144/s          103%               63%         61%           46%                --         -1%                -29%                -37%
unpack_loop         209520/s          106%               65%         63%           48%                1%          --                -28%                -37%
unpack_return_array 292713/s          187%              130%        128%          107%               41%         40%                  --                -12%
substr_return_array 330827/s          225%              160%        157%          134%               60%         58%                 13%                  --
100
                       Rate substr_assign substr_loop substr_return_ref unpack_assign unpack_return_ref unpack_loop unpack_return_array substr_return_array
substr_assign       11818/s            --        -25%              -25%          -26%              -53%        -55%                -63%                -70%
substr_loop         15677/s           33%          --               -0%           -2%              -38%        -40%                -51%                -60%
substr_return_ref   15752/s           33%          0%                --           -2%              -37%        -40%                -51%                -60%
unpack_assign       16061/s           36%          2%                2%            --              -36%        -39%                -50%                -59%
unpack_return_ref   25121/s          113%         60%               59%           56%                --         -4%                -22%                -35%
unpack_loop         26188/s          122%         67%               66%           63%                4%          --                -19%                -33%
unpack_return_array 32310/s          173%        106%              105%          101%               29%         23%                  --                -17%
substr_return_array 38910/s          229%        148%              147%          142%               55%         49%                 20%                  --
1000
                      Rate substr_assign substr_return_ref substr_loop unpack_assign unpack_return_ref unpack_loop unpack_return_array substr_return_array
substr_assign       1309/s            --              -23%        -25%          -28%              -52%        -54%                -62%                -67%
substr_return_ref   1709/s           31%                --         -3%           -6%              -38%        -41%                -51%                -57%
substr_loop         1756/s           34%                3%          --           -3%              -36%        -39%                -49%                -56%
unpack_assign       1815/s           39%                6%          3%            --              -34%        -37%                -48%                -55%
unpack_return_ref   2738/s          109%               60%         56%           51%                --         -5%                -21%                -32%
unpack_loop         2873/s          120%               68%         64%           58%                5%          --                -17%                -28%
unpack_return_array 3470/s          165%              103%         98%           91%               27%         21%                  --                -14%
substr_return_array 4015/s          207%              135%        129%          121%               47%         40%                 16%                  --
10000
                     Rate substr_assign substr_return_ref substr_loop unpack_assign unpack_return_ref unpack_loop unpack_return_array substr_return_array
substr_assign       131/s            --              -23%        -27%          -28%              -52%        -55%                -63%                -67%
substr_return_ref   171/s           30%                --         -5%           -6%              -38%        -42%                -52%                -57%
substr_loop         179/s           37%                5%          --           -1%              -35%        -39%                -50%                -55%
unpack_assign       181/s           38%                6%          1%            --              -34%        -38%                -49%                -55%
unpack_return_ref   274/s          109%               60%         53%           51%                --         -6%                -23%                -32%
unpack_loop         293/s          123%               71%         63%           62%                7%          --                -18%                -27%
unpack_return_array 356/s          171%              108%         98%           96%               30%         21%                  --                -11%
substr_return_array 400/s          205%              134%        123%          121%               46%         37%                 13%                  --
100000
                      Rate substr_assign substr_return_ref substr_loop unpack_assign unpack_return_ref unpack_loop unpack_return_array substr_return_array
substr_assign       13.0/s            --              -22%        -26%          -29%              -51%        -55%                -63%                -67%
substr_return_ref   16.7/s           29%                --         -5%           -8%              -37%        -43%                -52%                -58%
substr_loop         17.6/s           36%                5%          --           -3%              -33%        -40%                -50%                -56%
unpack_assign       18.2/s           40%                9%          3%            --              -31%        -37%                -48%                -54%
unpack_return_ref   26.4/s          103%               58%         50%           45%                --         -9%                -25%                -34%
unpack_loop         29.1/s          124%               74%         65%           60%               10%          --                -17%                -27%
unpack_return_array 35.1/s          170%              110%         99%           93%               33%         20%                  --                -12%
substr_return_array 39.7/s          206%              137%        125%          118%               50%         36%                 13%                  --

So back to the original question: "is unpack() ever faster than substr()?" Answer: always, for this type of application -- unless you don't care about the return values ;)

share|improve this answer
1  
Great answer -- thanks! –  FMc Jul 13 '09 at 14:25
2  
It was fun! & you're welcome :) –  dlowe Jul 13 '09 at 15:26
1  
This is almost the same situation I discuss in the Benchmarking chapter in Mastering Perl. In void context, grep is really speedy! –  brian d foy Oct 8 '09 at 23:20
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since asking this question, I have benchmarked substr against unpack several more times, under various conditions. Here are a few things I've learned:

  • Do not set up the benchmark in a way that calls Perl functions in void context (as I did in my original question; see the helpful response from dlowe). Some Perl functions have optimizations when they are called in void context (and these optimizations appear to vary by OS), potentially skewing your benchmarking results.

  • If your use of substr involves looping (for example, iterating over a list of column locations), unpack is always faster. However, the apparent slowness of substr in this situation is due to the overhead of the loop, not substr itself.

  • If just a few fields are required, substr is generally faster or as fast as unpack.

  • If more than a few fields are required, head-to-head comparisons between unpack and an equivalent number of substr calls do not vary much as the number of fields increases: both approaches become slower at the same rate.

  • Results can vary by operating system. On my Windows XP machine, unpack had a slight edge whenever more than a few fields were needed. On our Solaris machines at my workplace, substr was always faster, even into hundreds of fields.

Bottom line: the performance of unpack vs. substr is not a very big issue, regardless of the number of fields. Use whichever approach results in the clearest code. If you find yourself using substr in a looping construct, however, switching to unpack will result in a noteworthy speed boost.

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