Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
“Least Astonishment” in Python: The Mutable Default Argument

For class

class ValidationResult():
    def __init__(self, passed=True, messages=[], stop=False):
        self.passed = passed
        self.messages = messages
        self.stop = stop

running

foo = ValidationResult()
bar = ValidationResult() 
foo.messages.append("Foos message")  
print foo.messages
print bar.messages

produces

['Foos message']
['Foos message']

yet this

foo = ValidationResult()
bar = ValidationResult(messages=["Bars message"]) 
foo.messages.append("Foos message")  
print foo.messages
print bar.messages

produces

['Foos message']
['Bars message']

I think I've missed the boat on understanding instance attributes here. In the first sample, what I expected was Foos message to only be applied to foo. What is the correct way to declare an object attribute only mutable by its instance?

Using Python 2.7.1

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by JBernardo, larsmans, stephan, jamylak, Daniel Roseman May 31 '12 at 12:19

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
There are lots of questions about that. Do not use mutable objects as default argument of a function... –  JBernardo May 31 '12 at 12:14
3  
add comment

5 Answers 5

This self.messages is an alias of the default parameter. The default parameter is constructed with the function and not with the caller.

class ValidationResult():
    def __init__(self, passed=True, messages=None, stop=False):
        self.passed = passed
        self.messages = messages if messages is not None else []
        self.stop = stop

>>> foo = ValidationResult()
>>> bar = ValidationResult() 
>>> foo.messages.append("Foos message")  
>>> print foo.messages
['Foos message']
>>> print bar.messages
[]
share|improve this answer
    
the default paramater belongs to the function in the class to be more precise. –  jamylak May 31 '12 at 12:20
1  
Minor point, instead of testing if messages != None, your test should probably be messages is not None. –  mgilson May 31 '12 at 12:29
    
Cheers for the comments. Made both changes. –  Charles Beattie May 31 '12 at 14:51
add comment

This is a little quirk in python functions and can be seen just as well without the class:

def foo(bar=[]):
    bar.append('boo')
    print bar

foo()
foo()

The "problem" is that the default argument (bar) is created when the module is loaded. The same object continues to be passed as the default argument of foo if you don't explicitly pass something else.

The canonical way to use default arguments that are mutable is use a sentinel value (typically None) which can be tested using the is operator to indicate that the user didn't pass anything (unless mutating a default argument is desired in your function of course). e.g.:

def foo(bar=None):
    if(bar is None):
       bar=[]
    bar.append('boo')
    print bar

Here's a link to the documentation -- pay close attention to the "Important Warning" section.

share|improve this answer
    
So what happens if I call bar = ValidationResult(messages=foo.messaged)? The root problem is taking ownership of parameters, not default arguments. If you don't mutate your inputs, using [] as a default is quite safe. –  Ben May 31 '12 at 12:30
    
@Ben -- I can't think of any good situation where you would have an empty list as a default argument to a function and then not do anything to it. Even if you don't modify it in the function, but return it, then you could get very surprising behavior later. If the user wants to pass another list and have multiple references to the same list that's up the them. –  mgilson May 31 '12 at 12:40
    
@Ben -- I've added a clause saying that if you don't use the if mutable_arg is None trick if you actually want to mutate mutable_arg -- but I assumed that was obvious. –  mgilson May 31 '12 at 12:45
    
See, my conclusion from that is that protecting against mutating the default argument isn't a complete solution, and hence the if foo is not None: foo = [] trick is just masking the root issue. Most of my functions that take lists do something for each item in a list, not to the list. If I do need to do something to the list, I take a copy (usually in a list comprehension). –  Ben May 31 '12 at 12:51
    
@Ben -- It doesn't make sense to do something for each item in an empty list. The function shouldn't be called in this case -- If you don't know the list is empty a-priori, that's one thing, but in this case you certainly do since you're not passing any arguments to the function. The case you're describing seems like it should mutable_arg should be an argument, not a default argument. If you want to mutate a copy of the argument and return it, that's OK -- but it is limiting to the user who might want their argument mutated. –  mgilson May 31 '12 at 12:57
show 2 more comments

Nope, nothing to do with class attributes vs instance attributes.

The trouble is that all assignment in Python is simply binding references to objects, so whatever value was used as the messages parameter to __init__ ends up being the value stored as the messages attribute; it isn't copied. This is a problem when that value is also used elsewhere and can be mutated, since then changes to the object referenced by the messages attribute end up affecting other references to the same object.

Since you have a default value for the messages parameter to __init__, every time you call it without providing a value you get the same object filled in. Default values are default values, not recipes for creating new values, so every time the default value is used you get the same list.

People refer to this as the "mutable default argument" problem, but I think it's more general than that. It could easily bite you if you explicitly pass messages as well. The trouble really is that you're mutating an input parameter (by storing a reference to it in an instance attribute, which you then mutate), which is never a good idea unless mutating the object is the purpose of the function. That's normally not true of a constructor, so you should copy the list if you plan on mutating it.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can see what's happening here:

>>> class ValidationResult():
...     def __init__(self, passed=True, messages=[], stop=False):
...         self.passed = passed
...         self.messages = messages
...         print id(self.messages)
...         self.stop = stop
... 
>>> foo = ValidationResult()
4564756528
>>> bar = ValidationResult()
4564756528

The default argument is always the same object in memory. One quick workaround for lists is to create a copy of the list for each instantiation:

>>> class ValidationResult():
...     def __init__(self, passed=True, messages=[], stop=False):
...         self.passed = passed
...         self.messages = messages[:]
...         print id(self.messages)
...         self.stop = stop
... 
>>> foo = ValidationResult()
4564756312
>>> bar = ValidationResult()
4564757032
share|improve this answer
    
I had never thought about making a copy -- that's a good idea unless the user expects the list the pass to be the same list in ValidationResult. e.g. mylist=['foo'];v=ValidationResult(messages=mylist); mylist is v.messages #False, Huh? -- but that's probably not typically expected behavior anyway... –  mgilson May 31 '12 at 12:25
add comment

The empty list used as the default value of argument messages is a global variable. Thus in your first example, foo.messages is bar.messages is True whereas in your second example, you messages=["Bars message"], resulting in bar.messages is not foo.messages being True. This is most classic a trap!

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.