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Having population methods for test data population on the actual objects being tested, is it good or bad?

Example.

Car {
    List<String> passenger;
}

List passenger is populated by Hibernate/database in the application. As such I do not need any constructors for Car. However, for testing purposes in different test classes I need to create an car with different set of passenger. And instead of doing

Car c = new Car();
c.passenger.add("Hans");
c.passenger.add("Janne");
...

I would like to have an static method

Car {
    static Car makeCarWithPassenger(String... passenger) {
    // Make an car and populate passenger with passenger param.
    }
}

However, the method makeCarWithPassenger is really only going to be used by tests, and as such is this bad since I have added "test" code to my code? Note that I need to create Car with different sets of passengers in several different test classes.

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closed as not constructive by casperOne Jun 2 '12 at 4:05

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Off-topic, but I recommend not making passenger public. Even in tests. –  jsn May 31 '12 at 13:31
    
You could use a mocking framework to give your Car whatever characteristics you need for your test. –  assylias May 31 '12 at 13:33
    
No framework please –  ToreSk May 31 '12 at 13:39
    
@ToreSk any reasons? It's just a jar to add to your project, no change / annotation needed in your code... –  assylias May 31 '12 at 13:44
    
I have left out public etc. as it is not neccesary –  ToreSk May 31 '12 at 14:07

3 Answers 3

Create a seperate builder class which remains only within your test pack or an Object Mother. That keeps your production code unpolluted.

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I would suggest you create (or overload) a constructor to the Car class that accepts a passenger or passenger list which would then add them to your List passenger variable.

public class Car
{
    private List<Passenger> _passengers = new List<Passenger>();

    public Car() {}

    public Car(Passenger passenger)
    {
        _passengers.Add(passenger);
    }

    public Car(Passenger[] passengers)
    {
        _passengers.AddRange(passengers);
    }
}

public class Passenger
{
    public Passenger(string Name) {

    }

    public string Name{ get; private set;}
}

Then in your unit tests you can call

new Car(new Passenger("Janne")); 

or create a list of passengers

List<Passenger> people = new List<Passenger>();
people.Add(new Passenger("John"));
people.Add(new Passenger("Mike"));
people.Add(new Passenger("Ian"));

Car c = new Car(people.ToArray());

This way you haven't added specific test code to your application logic.

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Basically you suggest using an constructor instead of the static method. However the issue still remains, the constructor is only used for testnig purposes. –  ToreSk May 31 '12 at 13:37
    
Yes, but you 'may' need it in a factory or other such method in the future, It's not 'specific' testing code, just because it may only be used in tests now doesn't mean it won't be used in factories or creation methods in the future - sorry it's really hard to made a judgement on that as I don't know your application. A combination of the two, leave the constructors there as that is a logical place for them but also create static creation classes in your unit testing project to 'build' up the objects? –  Steve May 31 '12 at 13:46
    
Yes, but this is the orginal question. In my real example the creation and population of the objects are more complex than this example. –  ToreSk May 31 '12 at 14:10
    
@ToreSk I guessed your objects and creation process was more complex, its hard to make a judgement call as I don't understand the scope of complexity. My suggestion is to overload the constructors and then maybe use a factory / builder class in your test libraries to chain together the objects for testing. This approach doesn't see you putting test specific code into your business objects while still maintaining sane readable unit tests with the added benefit of code reuse if you should need factories / dependency injection inside the application logic in the future. –  Steve May 31 '12 at 14:25

I know you've stated in a comment "No framework please" but I think that Mocking tools may well help you here. I use Mockito for this (seriously clever tooling with awesome documentation). If you combine this with a dependency injection (DI) framework like Guice you can get a much more flexible and expressive test.

For instance, let's imagine you have some kind of service which wants to load a "Car". In a standard non-DI / non-mocking world, you'd do it something like this:

public class MyService {
  public Car loadCar(long id) {
    return hibernateSession.get(Car.class, id);
  }
}

[Or you'd use a factory pattern, but let's ignore that]

However, now your service is rigidly bound to hibernate and there's no way for you to manipulate the response from the "get" request. You can solve this by passing in the hibernateSession during construction:

public class MyService {
  public MyService(Session hibernateSession) {
    this.hibernateSession = hibernateSession;
  }

  public Car loadCar(long id) {
    return hibernateSession.get(Car.class, id);
  }
}

Now, in your test you just need to create an object which matches the "Session" interface:

public class TestMyService {
  @Test
  public void testLoadCar() {
    final Car carToReturn = new Car();
    carToReturn.passenger = new ArrayList<Passenger>();
    carToReturn.passenger.add("Hans");
    carToReturn.passenger.add("Janne");

    MyService serviceUnderTest = new MyService(new Session() { 
      ...
      public Object get(...) { return carToReturn; }
    });

    Car actual = serviceUnderTest.get(1);

    assertEquals(....);
  }
}

Personally, I don't like this. My main gripe is that we're accessing the contents of the Car object directly. Really we should be treating this as a POJO and have a getter (and possibly a setter) on class. When you access the class you should be using that getter, not directly accessing the field:

carToReturn.getPassengers()

My other gripe is that you have to implement a load of methods from Session which you don't actually care about. You'll end up with pages of empty methods in the anonymous inner type.

However, if you have the getters in place (good Java practice) and you are passing in the session in the constructor, you get the ability to use a mocking framework to do the hard work for you:

public class TestMyService {
  @Test
  public void testLoadCar() {
    final Car carToReturn = new Car();
    carToReturn.passenger = new ArrayList<Passenger>();
    carToReturn.passenger.add("Hans");
    carToReturn.passenger.add("Janne");

    Session hibernateSession = mock(Session.class, Mockito.RETURN_SMART_NULLS); 

    when(hibernateSession.get(eq(1))).thenReturn(carToReturn);

    MyService serviceUnderTest = new MyService(hibernateSession);

    Car actual = serviceUnderTest.get(1);

    assertEquals(....);
  }
}

Indeed, you could also mock out the return object using the same mechanism:

Car carToReturn = mock(Car.class, Mockito.RETURN_SMART_NULLS);

when(carToReturn.getPassengers()).thenReturn(new ArrayList<Passenger>());    

I'd question the usefulness of that though. It tends to be more wordy than necessary.

Once you've gone down the route of passing the dependent classes into a class (e.g. MyService depends on hibernate's Session), it's a short step to Dependency Injection:

public MyService {

  @Inject
  public MyService(Session hibernateSession) {
    ...
  }
}

If you construct this object using Guice, the code will automatically fetch you the declared hibernate Session object (i.e. the one that you've bound). This is a little off-topic but I hope you can see some of the potential for using DI.

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I really appriciate the answer. However, it seems as this is overenginered. My main issue was whereever to introduce population methods (or methods for creating data structures) in my business objects so that they could be used in several different test classes. Typically the car object would be used in several classes such as "CarRegisterService", "CarCalcualtions" etc. And as such CarRegisterServiceTest and CarCalcualtionsTest would need there own population methods for car –  ToreSk Jun 1 '12 at 11:29

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