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My question is like this one: c# list compare

but the only thing to note is this:

I'm using .NET Framework 2.0

So how can I compare two lists on C# framework 2 and return a boolean value if the items are different?

instance == anotherone fails
instance.Equals(anotherone) fails.

Edit:

They are both List

Edit 2

I'm trying to compare if the list values are exactly. I can sort them, np for that. The problem is if the count or the values of the items changes. For example:

List1->Item1 = "A"
List1->Item2 = "B"

List2->Item1 = "B"
List2->Item2 = "A"

//must return true


List1->Item1 = "A"
List1->Item2 = "B"

List2->Item1 = "B"
List2->Item2 = "C"

//must return false

List1->Item1 = "A"
List1->Item2 = "B"

List2->Item1 = "B"
List2->Item2 = "A"
List2->Item3 = "A"

//must return false, etc.

Thanks and kind regards.

share|improve this question
1  
what are the types? Your defined class instances? information is not enough, write more details please –  levi May 31 '12 at 14:00
1  
Do you care about the order of the items in the list, or are two lists equal if they contain the same items, regardless of order? –  FishBasketGordo May 31 '12 at 14:03
    
I don't care the order because I can sort them before if is needed for comparison. I'm looking for if any was added and/or deleted and/or updated to another value. –  Leandro May 31 '12 at 14:14
    
@Leandro: No, don't sort before hand. You turn the problem from one of O(n) complexity to one of O(n log n) complexity. –  Jason May 31 '12 at 14:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

For the question that you link to on computing the intersection, you would need to implement your own version of Intersect. This should get you started:

List<T> Intersect<T>(List<T> first, List<T> second) {
    Dictionary<T, T> potential = new Dictionary<T, T>();
    foreach (var item in first) {
        potential.Add(item, item);
    }
    List<T> intersection = new List<T>();
    foreach (var item in second) {
        if (potential.Remove(item)) {
            intersection.Add(item);
        }
    }
    return intersection;
}

To handle if they have the same items with the same frequency:

bool AreSameAsMultiSets(List<T> first, List<T> second) {
    Dictionary<T, int> counts = new Dictionary<T, int>();     
    foreach (var item in first) {
        if (!counts.ContainsKey(item)) {
            counts.Add(item, 0);
        }
        counts[item] = counts[item] + 1;
    }
    foreach (var item in second) {
        if (!counts.ContainsKey(item)) {
            return false;
        }
        counts[item] = counts[item] - 1;
    }
    foreach (var entry in counts) {
        if (entry.Value != 0) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

You should probably add some error-handling to the above (first is not null, second is not null). Note that you can't use HashSet<T> since you're in .NET 2.0.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure Intersect is what he wants here. –  Rawling May 31 '12 at 14:04
    
sorry, but can you describe more your code? Thanks. –  Leandro May 31 '12 at 14:04
2  
@Rawling: The question that he links to asks how to compute the intersection. Note that my second method AreSameAsMultiSets addresses his question about seeing if they have the same items. –  Jason May 31 '12 at 14:08
    
Oh, I get it now, thanks! –  Leandro May 31 '12 at 14:09
    
@Leandro if this answers your question you should click the check-mark below the vote arrows to "mark as accepted answer" –  Scott Chamberlain May 31 '12 at 14:23

If you want to check if the lists contain identical items (i.e. the same items in the same order):

public static bool ListsEqual<T>(List<T> list1, List<T> list2) {
  if (list1.Count != list2.Count) return false;
  for (int i = 0; i < list1.Count; i++) {
    if (list1[i] != list2[i]) return false;
  }
  return true;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Why the downvote? If you don't explain what you think is wrong, it can't improve the answer. –  Guffa May 31 '12 at 14:11
    
OP specifies (not sure if it was added after your answer or not) that two lists are equal if they have the same items that are NOT in the same order. For the record, I didn't downvote. –  Servy May 31 '12 at 14:13
    
Sorry, I specified the "order detail" after the answer. I vote it up, is useful to me. –  Leandro May 31 '12 at 14:17
    
this answer can be solved with: stackoverflow.com/questions/390900/… It's not generic but I used it, it's wonderful. Thanks a lot. –  Leandro May 31 '12 at 14:39

Leandro,

You could also use my open source Compare .NET Objects Library. You would set the Config.IgnoreCollectionOrder to true.

https://comparenetobjects.codeplex.com/

[Test]
public void ComparerIgnoreOrderSimpleArraysTest()
{
    var a = new String[] { "A", "E", "F" };
    var b = new String[] { "A", "c", "d", "F" };

    var comparer = new CompareLogic();
    comparer.Config.IgnoreCollectionOrder = true;
    comparer.Config.MaxDifferences = int.MaxValue;

    ComparisonResult result = comparer.Compare(a, b);
    Console.WriteLine(result.DifferencesString);
    Assert.IsTrue(result.Differences.Where(d => d.Object1Value == "E").Count() == 1);
    Assert.IsTrue(result.Differences.Where(d => d.Object2Value == "c").Count() == 1);
    Assert.IsTrue(result.Differences.Where(d => d.Object2Value == "d").Count() == 1);

}
share|improve this answer
    
this is a little old but thanks! +1 –  Leandro Sep 3 '14 at 14:52

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