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For an online course in python, I'm making a basic text-based adventure game in python.

Right now, I have a rudimentary inventory system that works through booleans for if the user has an object or not, and integers for limited items, such as ammo and whatnot. Here is the code for the inventory system

def Inventory(self): #The inventory for the game.  I don't know how to program it properly, so this is my testing ground. 
#This will hold the boolean values to if the player has the items or not.  Another will be used to show the user the items

    street_clothes = False
    pistol = False
    ammo = 0
    phone = False

And this is the code where I am trying to modify the inventory function above

#Eric's apartment
 def Eric_Apartment(self):

    print "type in grab your gun"

    action = raw_input("> ")

    if action == "grab":
        self.Inventory(CR97) = True
    #   self.CR97_ammo += 15
    #   print CR97_ammo
    #   print self.CR97_ammo

    exit(1)

Attempting to run this program gets me this error:

python ex43.py
File "ex43.py", line 78
self.Inventory(CR97) = True
SyntaxError: can't assign to function call

Is there something else I'm supposed to do? I'm very new to python, and this is my first project on my own.

Here is the entire code, for reference

from sys import exit #allows the program to use the exit(1) code
from random import randint #allows the program to use a random number

class Game(object):

#quotes that pop up if the person dies, and also defines the start and self variables
 def __init__(self, start):
    self.quips = [
        "You lose!"
    ]
    self.start = start

 def Inventory(self): #The inventory for the game.  
#This will hold the boolean values to if the player has the items or not. 

    street_clothes = False
    pistol = False
    ammo = 0
    phone = False


#this function launches the game, and helps with the room transfer
 def play(self):
    next = self.start

    while True:
        print "\n---------"
        room = getattr(self, next)
        next = room( )

#if the user dies, or fails at the game, this is the function that is ran
 def death(self):
    print self.quips[randint(0, len(self.quips)-1)]
    exit(1)

#Welcome screen to the game
 def welcome_screen(self):
    print " place holder"
    return 'intro_screen'

#Intro screen to the game
 def intro_screen(self):

    print "place holder"

    action = raw_input("> Press any key to continue ")

    return 'Eric_Apartment'

#Eric's apartment
 def Eric_Apartment(self):

    print "type in grab your gun"

    action = raw_input("> ")

    if action == "grab":
        self.Inventory(CR97) = True
    #   self.CR97_ammo += 15
    #   print CR97_ammo
    #   print self.CR97_ammo

    exit(1)

a_game = Game("welcome_screen")
a_game.play()
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2 Answers 2

That's an amazingly perverse way to go about it. Why are you using a function to store data?

Just have a player object, with an inventory array.

I'd recommend using objects to model items too. Good use for for a class hierarchy. COuld have a base Item, with Subclasses SingleItem and StackableItem, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
And I'd suggest using a set to represent the inventory –  Diego Navarro May 31 '12 at 14:47
    
I'm very new to OOP. would I modify things in another class with say, I have the player grab a gun: code Inventory.gun = True code assuming I still use booleans to store if a player has it or not? –  user1428649 May 31 '12 at 14:57
    
Never mind, I tested that part out. It works. The only OOP programming I've ever done was Java. I'm still a newbie to that too. –  user1428649 May 31 '12 at 15:01
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Instead of using a function, try using a class -

class Player:
    def __init__(self):
        self.street_clothes = False
        self.pistol = False
        self.ammo = 0
        self.phone = False
    def give_street_clothes(self):
        self.street_clothes = True
    # etc

But personally, instead of using each item as a boolean, I'd use a list of items:

class Player:
    def __init__(self):
        self.inventory = []
        # add code for ammo/pistol
    def has_item(self, item):
        return item in self.inventory
    def give_item(self, item):
        self.inventory.add(item)
    def remove_item(self, item):
        self.inventory.remove(item)
    # etc
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