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I was looking at perl code online and came across something I hadn't seen before and can't find out what it's doing (if anything).

if($var) {{
   ...
}}

Does anyone know what the double curly braces mean?

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5  
I don't think they do anything. I think they are equivalent to adding another block of code in the if block. –  gpojd May 31 '12 at 14:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

It's a trick usually employed with do, see chapter Statement Modifiers in perlsyn.

Probably the author wanted to jump out of the block with next or the like.

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This appears to be what the code is doing. The last keyword is used in the code in the if block. Thanks! –  Chris May 31 '12 at 15:11

There are two statements there. An "if" statement and a bare block. Bare blocks are loops that are executed exactly once.

say "a";
{
   say "b";
}
say "c";

# Outputs a b c

But being loops, they do influence next, last and redo.

my $i = 0;
say "a";
LOOP: {  # Purely descriptive (and thus optional) label.
   ++$i;
   say "b";
   redo if $i == 1;
   say "c";
   last if $i == 2;
   say "d";
}
say "e";

# Outputs a b b c e

(next does the same as last since there is no next element.)

They are usually used to create a lexical scope.

my $file;
{
   local $/;
   open(my $fh, '<', $qfn) or die;
   $file = <$fh>;
}
# At this point,
# - $fh is cleared,
# - $fh is no longer visible,
# - the file handle is closed, and
# - $/ is restored.

It's unclear why one was used here.


Alternatively, it could also be a hash constructor.

sub f {
   ...
   if (@errors) {
      { status => 'error', errors => \@errors }
   } else {
      { status => 'ok' }
   }
}

is short for

sub f {
   ...
   if (@errors) {
      return { status => 'error', errors => \@errors };
   } else {
      return { status => 'ok' };
   }
}

Perl peeks into the braces to guess if it's a bare loop or a hash constructor. Since you didn't provide the contents of the braces, we can't tell.

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1  
+1 for mentioning the possibility of a hash constructor. –  chepner May 31 '12 at 20:32

In case of if, they are probably equivalent to single braces (but it depends on what's inside the block and outside the if, cf.

perl -E ' say for map { if (1) {{ 1,2,3,4 }} } 1 .. 2'

). There are reasons to use double braces, though, with next or do, see perlsyn. For example, try running this several times:

perl -E 'if (1) {{ say $c++; redo if int rand 2 }}'

And try to replace double braces with single ones.

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that's a nice example. –  ysth May 31 '12 at 15:41

Without much more code, it's hard to say what they're being used for. It could be a typo, or it could be a naked block, see chapter 10.4 The Naked Block Control Structure in Learning Perl.

A naked block adds lexical scoping to variables within the block.

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Doesn't the first set of braces after the if already provide that scoping? Why nest? I'm largely ignorant of perl, so maybe it's obvious to people, but not to me! –  Chris Farmer May 31 '12 at 15:00
2  
@ChrisFarmer: because if (1) {{ my $x = 1; } { my $x = 2; }} –  choroba May 31 '12 at 15:04
    
By adding the second scope, you could reassign $var and use it in the naked block in a way that is not visible outside of the if block. –  Jim Schubert May 31 '12 at 15:04
    
Thanks for the edit, daxim. I thought I had linked to an article on O'Reilly because that site looked so much like the O'Reilly equivalent –  Jim Schubert May 31 '12 at 16:22

The {{ can be used to break out of an "if block". I have some code that contains:

if ($entry =~ m{\nuid: ([^\s]+)}) {{ # double brace so "last" will break out of "if"
    my $uid = $1;
    last if exists $special_case{$uid};
    # ....

}}
# last breaks to here
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