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I have a table and I want to update one of its varchar fields based on the values in an XML parameter.

I have the following table:

ID  Constraint_Value
1   (OldVal_1) (OldVal_2)
2   (OldVal_2) (OldVal_1)

and I want to use the following XML to update the Constraint_Value field:

<qaUpdates>
    <qaUpdate><old>OldVal_1</old><new>NewVal_1</new></qaUpdate>
    <qaUpdate><old>OldVal_2</old><new>NewVal_2</new></qaUpdate>
</qaUpdates>

After the update, I am aiming for the following:

ID    Constraint_Value
1     (NewVal_1) (NewVal_2)
2     (NewVal_2) (NewVal_1)

The following SQL illustrates my problem (which you can run in SQL Management Studio without any set up) :

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#tmpConstraint') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE #tmpConstraint
GO 

CREATE TABLE tempdb..#tmpConstraint ( constraint_id INT PRIMARY KEY, constraint_value varchar(256) )
GO

insert into #tmpConstraint
values (1, '(OldVal_1) (OldVal_2)')

insert into #tmpConstraint
values (2, '(OldVal_2) (OldVal_1)')

select * from #tmpConstraint

declare @myXML XML
set @myXML = N'<qaUpdates>
    <qaUpdate><old>OldVal_1</old><new>NewVal_1</new></qaUpdate>
    <qaUpdate><old>OldVal_2</old><new>NewVal_2</new></qaUpdate>
</qaUpdates>'

update c
set constraint_value = REPLACE(constraint_value, Child.value('(old)[1]', 'varchar(50)'), Child.value('(new)[1]', 'varchar(50)'))
from #tmpConstraint c
cross join @myXML.nodes('/qaUpdates/qaUpdate') as N(Child) 

select * from #tmpConstraint

This gives the results:

(Before)
1   (OldVal_1) (OldVal_2)
2   (OldVal_2) (OldVal_1)

(After)
1   (NewVal_1) (OldVal_2)
2   (OldVal_2) (NewVal_1)

As you can see just OldVal_1 has been updated. OldVal_2 has remained the same.

How do I update the field with all the elements specified in the xml parameter?

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Making use of a recursive cte allows me to get the result you're looking for. As the following shows. But att least its not a cursor/while-loop ;)

declare @tmpConstraint table (ID int , Constraint_Value varchar(256))
insert into @tmpConstraint values 
(1, '(OldVal_1) (OldVal_2)'),
(2, '(OldVal_2) (OldVal_1)')

declare @myXML XML
set @myXML = N'<qaUpdates>
    <qaUpdate><old>OldVal_1</old><new>NewVal_1</new></qaUpdate>
    <qaUpdate><old>OldVal_2</old><new>NewVal_2</new></qaUpdate>
</qaUpdates>'

declare @xmlData table (oldValue varchar(256), newValue varchar(256))
insert into @xmlData 
select 
    oldValue = Child.value('(old)[1]', 'varchar(50)'), 
    newValue = Child.value('(new)[1]', 'varchar(50)')
from @myXML.nodes('/qaUpdates/qaUpdate') as N(Child) 

The above was just setup for the following.

;with cte (ID, Constraint_Value, CLevel)
as
(
    select c.ID, c.Constraint_Value, 1
    from @tmpConstraint c

    union all

    select p.ID, cast(replace(p.Constraint_Value, x.oldValue, x.newValue) as varchar(256)), p.CLevel + 1
    from cte p
    join @xmlData x on p.Constraint_Value like '%' + x.oldValue + '%'
)
update c
set c.Constraint_Value = t.Constraint_Value
from @tmpConstraint c
join (
    select 
        *,
        rn = row_number() over (partition by ID order by CLevel desc)
    from cte
) t on t.ID = c.ID and rn = 1

select * from @tmpConstraint
share|improve this answer
    
Great answer, @mouters. Using cte's is a very clever solution. Thanks. –  Mark Robinson Jun 1 '12 at 9:15
    
no glad i could help –  Chris Moutray Jun 1 '12 at 10:54
    
This is a nice solution, but it's really a loop hidden in the CTE. Also be aware that the CTE can have many more rows in it than the original table (for each row with n matching values, you'll get 1 + n + n(n-1) + n(n-1)(n-2)+...n! rows). Also be aware that the default OPTION (MAXRECURSION n) value is 100. But, for moderately sized tables with few matches per row, I like it. –  GilM Jun 1 '12 at 22:33
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I think the issue here has nothing to do with XML. It's that a single UPDATE will only update each row once, regardless of how many joined rows exist. I think you could add a WHERE clause and a WHILE loop to get all of your substitutions:

WHILE @@ROWCOUNT>0
BEGIN
  update c 
  set constraint_value = REPLACE(constraint_value, Child.value('(old)[1]', 'varchar(50)'), Child.value('(new)[1]', 'varchar(50)')) 
  from #tmpConstraint c 
  cross join @myXML.nodes('/qaUpdates/qaUpdate') as N(Child)  
  WHERE constraint_value LIKE '%' + Child.value('(old)[1]', 'varchar(50)') + '%'
END

Just be sure that this follows a statement that sets @@RowCount.

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I realize this has already been answered but I was curious to see if there was a way to do this without using a cte. At any rate the bigger problem is really that you are storing 2 pieces of data in the same column/row. This coupled with the fact that you cannot update the same row twice within a single update statement is causing your issues. Anyhow my approach was this( I apologize ahead of time for complexity):

DECLARE @tmpConstraint TABLE (
    constraint_id INT PRIMARY KEY
    ,constraint_value VARCHAR(256)
    )

INSERT INTO @tmpConstraint
VALUES (
    1
    ,'(OldVal_1) (OldVal_2)'
    )

INSERT INTO @tmpConstraint
VALUES (
    2
    ,'(OldVal_2) (OldVal_1)'
    )

INSERT INTO @tmpConstraint
VALUES (
    3
    ,'(OldVal_3) (OldVal_21) (OldVal_1)'
    )

DECLARE @myXML XML

SET @myXML = N'<qaUpdates>     <qaUpdate><old>OldVal_1</old><new>NewVal_1</new></qaUpdate>     <qaUpdate><old>OldVal_2</old><new>NewVal_2</new></qaUpdate> </qaUpdates>'

SELECT *
FROM @tmpConstraint

UPDATE C
SET constraint_value = c.New_Val
FROM (
    SELECT Constraint_ID UpdID
        ,Constraint_value
        ,STUFF((
                SELECT (' ' + New_value)
                FROM (
                    --Converts XML into a Table effectively splitting the string
                    SELECT constraint_id
                        ,t.value('.', 'varchar(200)') Current_value
                        ,Coalesce(Nullif('(' + new + ')', '()'), t.value('.', 'varchar(200)')) New_Value
                    FROM
                        --Converts single column into an xml document to split rows. Uses a blank space as the identifer of rows
                        (
                        SELECT constraint_id
                            ,convert(XML, ('<R>' + replace(constraint_value, ' ', '</R><R>')) + '</R>') xmldoc
                        FROM @tmpConstraint
                        ) AS a
                    CROSS APPLY a.xmldoc.nodes('./R') AS b(t)
                    --Join to table containing proposed changes based on value to change            
                    LEFT JOIN (
                        SELECT Child.value('./old[1]', 'varchar(100)') old
                            ,Child.value('./new[1]', 'varchar(100)') new
                        FROM @myXML.nodes('/qaUpdates/qaUpdate') AS N(Child
                        )
                    ) q2 ON '(' + old + ')' = t.value('.', 'varchar(200)')
                ) Modified WHERE Modified.constraint_id = base.constraint_id FOR XML path(''))
        ,1,1,'') New_Val
FROM @tmpConstraint Base ) c

SELECT *
FROM @tmpConstraint

It looks alot messier than it is and could be cleaned up if you had some UDF's in there. But basicaly I break your multivalue column into multiple rows. Turning this

1   (OldVal_1) (OldVal_2)
2   (OldVal_2) (OldVal_1)
3   (OldVal_3) (OldVal_21) (OldVal_1)

into this

1   (OldVal_1)
1   (OldVal_2)
2   (OldVal_2)
2   (OldVal_1)
3   (OldVal_3)
3   (OldVal_21)
3   (OldVal_1)

I do the same with the xml file. Turning it into a Key data pair set like this

OldVal_1    NewVal_1
OldVal_2    NewVal_2

Join that with the table created before to get this (duplicating the orignal value where there was no replacement determined)

1   (OldVal_1)  (NewVal_1)
1   (OldVal_2)  (NewVal_2)
2   (OldVal_2)  (NewVal_2)
2   (OldVal_1)  (NewVal_1)
3   (OldVal_3)  (OldVal_3)
3   (OldVal_21) (OldVal_21)
3   (OldVal_1)  (NewVal_1)

Recombine the seperated rows into a single string again grouped by constraint id like so:

1   (OldVal_1) (OldVal_2)       (NewVal_1) (NewVal_2)
2   (OldVal_2) (OldVal_1)       (NewVal_2) (NewVal_1)
3   (OldVal_3) (OldVal_21) (OldVal_1)   (OldVal_3) (OldVal_21) (NewVal_1)

Then use that in my from statement to update the data in the orignal table. Anyhow I realize the code could be cleaned up a bit and probably even simplified but thats the concept I came up with. Really the bigger problem is how you are storing this data. But your circumstances are unknown to me so Ill reserve judgement.

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I cant comment on @mouters post but the matching criteria for his solution will cause incorrect data modifications. Olddata21 is the same as Olddata2 but that could easily be corrected using more stringent matching criteria. –  KickerCost.com Jun 1 '12 at 20:14
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