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well, this is not an easy question, but in the fiddle you will see a simplified version of what it is i am trying to do:

I want to instantiate an object, do all the operation i need to initialize it, but i want the statement:

var obj = new class; 

to return 'false' to obj given some conditions.

here's the code anyhow:

var cl = function(id){
   this.init(id);
   if(this.id > 5){
       return false;
   }
};


cl.prototype = {
    init: function(id){
        this.id = id;                        

    }
}

var arr = [];

for(i = 0; i < 10; i++){
    var obj = new cl(i);
    if(obj){
         arr.push(obj);
    }
}

console.log(arr);

I know the end result can be achieved by creating a control property to the object, but i am curious to if there is any pattern to do this cleaner.

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1  
you can't return anything but the object created when new is used. so I would do throw new Error("Invalid id") and abort the operation. –  arahaya May 31 '12 at 15:12
1  
you can also return an other object (null is a value, although typeof null is object), everything else returned is ignored. –  jasssonpet May 31 '12 at 15:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

maybe not exactly what you've asked, but a solution could be to use the factory pattern. Ofcourse you'd have to call the factory method instead of the constructor. checkout this fidlle

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btw; this is not the use the factory pattern is intended for... but it does work, and does create either an object or a boolean for you. And if it works, what the hell ;) –  giorgio May 31 '12 at 15:27
    
thanks, it is also not what i was looking for, but cudos for presenting me with a valid alternative –  André Alçada Padez May 31 '12 at 16:17

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