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I would like to check to see if I have an Internet connection on the iPhone using the Cocoa Touch libraries.

I came up with a way to do this using an NSURL. The way I did it seems a bit unreliable (because even Google could one day be down and relying on a 3rd party seems bad) and while I could check to see for a response from some other websites if Google didn't respond, it does seem wasteful and an unnecessary overhead on my application.

- (BOOL) connectedToInternet
{
    NSString *URLString = [NSString stringWithContentsOfURL:[NSURL URLWithString:@"http://www.google.com"]];
    return ( URLString != NULL ) ? YES : NO;
}

Is what I have done bad? (Not to mention stringWithContentsOfURL is deprecated in 3.0) And if so what is a better way to accomplish this?

share|improve this question
3  
Rather return (BOOL)URLString;, or even better, return !!URLString or return URLString != nil –  user529758 Jun 24 '12 at 20:48
1  
I don't know what your use case is, but if you can it's preferable to try the request and handle any errors such as a lack of connection that arise. If you can't do this, then there's plenty of good advice here in this case. –  SK9 Jul 1 '13 at 5:06
1  
Your solution is clever, and I prefer it. You can also use NSString *URLString = [NSString stringWithContentsOfURL:[NSURL URLWithString:@"https://twitter.com/getibox"] encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding error:nil]; To get rid of the annoying warning. –  Abd-Elrhman Rizk Oct 29 '13 at 16:56
3  
try using Reachability class from the below link, it will work for you github.com/tonymillion/Reachability –  Dhaval Nena Jan 1 at 12:11
2  
For those recently finding this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/8813279 –  afollestad Apr 17 at 20:16

31 Answers 31

up vote 881 down vote accepted

METHOD 1: Use a simple (ARC and GCD compatible) class to do it

1) Add SystemConfiguration framework to the project but don't worry about including it anywhere

2) Add Tony Million's version of Reachability.h and Reachability.m to the project (found here: https://github.com/tonymillion/Reachability)

3) Update the interface section

#import "Reachability.h"

// Add this to the interface in the .m file of your view controller
@interface MyViewController ()
{
    Reachability *internetReachableFoo;
}
@end

4) Then implement this method in the .m file of your view controller which you can call

// Checks if we have an internet connection or not
- (void)testInternetConnection
{   
    internetReachableFoo = [Reachability reachabilityWithHostname:@"www.google.com"];

    // Internet is reachable
    internetReachableFoo.reachableBlock = ^(Reachability*reach)
    {
        // Update the UI on the main thread
        dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
            NSLog(@"Yayyy, we have the interwebs!");
        });
    };

    // Internet is not reachable
    internetReachableFoo.unreachableBlock = ^(Reachability*reach)
    {
        // Update the UI on the main thread
        dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
            NSLog(@"Someone broke the internet :(");
        });
    };

    [internetReachableFoo startNotifier];
}

METHOD 2: Do it yourself the old way using Apple's outdated Reachability class

1) Add SystemConfiguration framework to the project but don't worry about including it anywhere

2) Add Apple's version of Reachability.h and Reachability.m to the project (you can get those here)

3) Add @class Reachability; to the .h file of where you are implementing the code

4) Create a couple instances to check in the interface section of the .h file:

Reachability* internetReachable;
Reachability* hostReachable;

5) Add a method in the .h for when the network status updates:

-(void) checkNetworkStatus:(NSNotification *)notice;

6) Add #import "Reachability.h" to the .m file where you are implementing the check

7) In the .m file of where you are implementing the check, you can place this in one of the first methods called (init or viewWillAppear or viewDidLoad etc):

-(void) viewWillAppear:(BOOL)animated
{
    // check for internet connection
    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self selector:@selector(checkNetworkStatus:) name:kReachabilityChangedNotification object:nil];

    internetReachable = [Reachability reachabilityForInternetConnection];
    [internetReachable startNotifier];

    // check if a pathway to a random host exists
    hostReachable = [Reachability reachabilityWithHostName:@"www.apple.com"];
    [hostReachable startNotifier];

    // now patiently wait for the notification
}

8) Set up the method for when the notification gets sent and set whatever checks or call whatever methods you may have set up (in my case, I just set a BOOL)

-(void) checkNetworkStatus:(NSNotification *)notice
{
    // called after network status changes
    NetworkStatus internetStatus = [internetReachable currentReachabilityStatus];
    switch (internetStatus)
    {
        case NotReachable:
        {
            NSLog(@"The internet is down.");
            self.internetActive = NO;

            break;
        }
        case ReachableViaWiFi:
        {
            NSLog(@"The internet is working via WIFI.");
            self.internetActive = YES;

            break;
        }
        case ReachableViaWWAN:
        {
            NSLog(@"The internet is working via WWAN.");
            self.internetActive = YES;

            break;
        }
    }

    NetworkStatus hostStatus = [hostReachable currentReachabilityStatus];
    switch (hostStatus)
    {
        case NotReachable:
        {
            NSLog(@"A gateway to the host server is down.");
            self.hostActive = NO;

            break;
        }
        case ReachableViaWiFi:
        {
            NSLog(@"A gateway to the host server is working via WIFI.");
            self.hostActive = YES;

            break;
        }
        case ReachableViaWWAN:
        {
            NSLog(@"A gateway to the host server is working via WWAN.");
            self.hostActive = YES;

            break;
        }
    }
}

9) In your dealloc or viewWillDisappear or similar method, remove yourself as an observer

-(void) viewWillDisappear:(BOOL)animated
{
    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] removeObserver:self];
}

Note: There might be an instance using viewWillDisappear where you receive a memory warning and the observer never gets unregistered so you should account for that as well.


Note: The domain you use doesn't matter. It's just testing for a gateway to any domain.

Important Note: The Reachability class is one of the most used classes in projects so you might run into naming conflicts with other projects like ShareKit. If this happens, you'll have to rename one of the pairs of Reachability.h and Reachability.m files to something else to resolve the issue.

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4  
Step 2) Add Reachability.h and Reachability.m to the project What do you mean by that? How shall we add it? create empty class or somehow else? Thanks –  Burjua Oct 13 '10 at 15:49
7  
Reachability.h and .m are included in Apple's Reachability example in the iPhone OS Reference Library. You get those files from there. –  iWasRobbed Oct 13 '10 at 22:58
30  
I think if "google.com" isn't reachable, then, yes, the Internet has problems! But, if your app requires Internet connectivity in general, google is as general as it gets! If it requires access to a particular server then why not use that server for testing? –  gonzobrains Jun 14 '11 at 10:55
3  
Funny thing: i just noticed that if iPhone is connected to AdHoc WiFi (no internet connectivity) the result is still positive for internet connectivity via WiFi. –  rokjarc Feb 21 '12 at 16:23
9  
and add #import <netinet/in.h> to Reachability.h to fix the "declaration of 'struct sockaddr_in' will not be visible outside of this function" warning –  Patrick Aug 21 '12 at 8:17

I like to keep things simple. The way I do this is:

//Class.h
#import "Reachability.h"
#import <SystemConfiguration/SystemConfiguration.h>

- (BOOL)connected;

//Class.m
- (BOOL)connected 
{
    Reachability *reachability = [Reachability reachabilityForInternetConnection];  
    NetworkStatus networkStatus = [reachability currentReachabilityStatus]; 
    return networkStatus != NotReachable;
}

Then, I use this whenever I wanna see if I have a connection:

if (![self connected]) {
    // not connected    
} else {
    // connected, do some internet stuff 
}

This method doesn't wait for changed network statuses in order to do stuff, it just tests the status when you ask it to.

share|improve this answer
1  
@cannyboy I just tried implementing you code as it seemed the simplest and it worked well.. Until I tested something. I disconnected the adsl line from my router, so in effect keeping the wifi network up but taking down the internet connection. Despite this the code when run still seems to think it is connected to the internet. Have you tried this? Is there a way to make sure that it is actually connected to the internet and not just to a network? –  msec May 2 '12 at 10:29

Using Apple's Reachability code I created a function that'll check this correctly without you having to include any classes.

Include the SystemConfiguration.framework in your project.

Make some imports

#import <sys/socket.h>
#import <netinet/in.h>
#import <SystemConfiguration/SystemConfiguration.h>

Now just call this function

/* 
Connectivity testing code pulled from Apple's Reachability Example: http://developer.apple.com/library/ios/#samplecode/Reachability
 */
+(BOOL)hasConnectivity {
    struct sockaddr_in zeroAddress;
    bzero(&zeroAddress, sizeof(zeroAddress));
    zeroAddress.sin_len = sizeof(zeroAddress);
    zeroAddress.sin_family = AF_INET;

    SCNetworkReachabilityRef reachability = SCNetworkReachabilityCreateWithAddress(kCFAllocatorDefault, (const struct sockaddr*)&zeroAddress);
    if(reachability != NULL) {
        //NetworkStatus retVal = NotReachable;
        SCNetworkReachabilityFlags flags;
        if (SCNetworkReachabilityGetFlags(reachability, &flags)) {
            if ((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsReachable) == 0)
            {
                // if target host is not reachable
                return NO;
            }

            if ((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsConnectionRequired) == 0)
            {
                // if target host is reachable and no connection is required
                //  then we'll assume (for now) that your on Wi-Fi
                return YES;
            }


            if ((((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsConnectionOnDemand ) != 0) ||
                 (flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsConnectionOnTraffic) != 0))
            {
                // ... and the connection is on-demand (or on-traffic) if the
                //     calling application is using the CFSocketStream or higher APIs

                if ((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsInterventionRequired) == 0)
                {
                    // ... and no [user] intervention is needed
                    return YES;
                }
            }

            if ((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsIsWWAN) == kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsIsWWAN)
            {
                // ... but WWAN connections are OK if the calling application
                //     is using the CFNetwork (CFSocketStream?) APIs.
                return YES;
            }
        }
    }

    return NO;
}

And it's iOS5 tested for ya.

share|improve this answer
9  
Fantastic! The accepted answer doesn't work, but this does, and it's much slimmer. This should be the accepted answer. –  Jezen Thomas Nov 3 '11 at 14:38
4  
For anyone wondering how you call this function. Do this ... if([self hasConnectivity] == NO) { // not connected } else { //connected do your stuff} –  Sam B Aug 8 '12 at 18:54
4  
This leaks memory - the 'readability' structure (object, thing) needs to be freed with CFRelease(). –  Russell Mull Nov 20 '12 at 8:52

Edit: This used to be the correct answer, but is now outdated as you should subscribe to notifications for reachability instead. This methods checks synchronously:

You can use Apple's Reachability class. It will also allow you to check if WiFi is enabled:

Reachability* reachability = [Reachability sharedReachability];
[reachability setHostName:@"www.example.com"];    // set your host name here
NetworkStatus remoteHostStatus = [reachability remoteHostStatus];

if(remoteHostStatus == NotReachable) { }
else if (remoteHostStatus == ReachableViaWiFiNetwork) { }
else if (remoteHostStatus == ReachableViaCarrierDataNetwork) { }

The Reachability class is not shipped with the SDK, but rather a part of this Apple sample application. Just download it and copy Reachability.h/m to your project. Also, you have to add the SystemConfiguration framework to your project.

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6  
See my comment above about not using Reachability like that. Use it in asynchronous mode and subscribe to the notifications it sends - don't. –  Kendall Helmstetter Gelner Jul 6 '09 at 4:29

Here's a very simple answer:

NSURL *scriptUrl = [NSURL URLWithString:@"http://apps.wegenerlabs.com/hi.html"];
NSData *data = [NSData dataWithContentsOfURL:scriptUrl];
if (data)
    NSLog(@"Device is connected to the internet");
else
    NSLog(@"Device is not connected to the internet");

The URL points to an extremely small website that can be loaded fast in a cellular network. You are welcome to use my website, but you can also put a small file on your own website.

If checking whether the device is somehow connected to the internet is everything you want to do, I'd definitely recommend using this simple solution.

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6  
I really like this idea, but I would say for the 99.999% reliability while maintaining a small response size, go with www.google.com/m which is the mobile view for google. –  rwyland Sep 23 '12 at 5:46

Apple supplies sample code to check for different types of network availability. Alternatively there is an example in the iPhone developers cookbook.

Note: Please see @KHG's comment on this answer regarding the use of Apple's reachability code.

share|improve this answer
4  
Note that from experience, you should NOT use the Reachability code as-is. Note the part where the code mentions uncommenting a bit to use it asynchronosouly? Use that to get connectivity notifications. Also, always set the host value for reachability and do not use the reachability code as a pre-flight check to see if a connection is OK. Instead, start the Reachability notifications, then start you connection going - you'll get a notification right away if there i no connection and you can cancel the original request then issue an alert or do whatever you need to do. –  Kendall Helmstetter Gelner Jul 6 '09 at 4:26
5  
Note that the new revision (09-08-09) of the Reachability sample code from Apple is asynchronous. –  Daniel Hepper Jan 17 '10 at 21:03

Here is how I do it in my apps: While a 200 status response code doesn't guarantee anything, it is stable enough for me. This doesn't require as much loading as the NSData answers posted here, as mine just checks the HEAD response.

Swift Code

func checkInternet(flag:Bool, completionHandler:(internet:Bool) -> Void)
{
    UIApplication.sharedApplication().networkActivityIndicatorVisible = true

    let url = NSURL(string: "http://www.google.com/")
    let request = NSMutableURLRequest(URL: url!)

    request.HTTPMethod = "HEAD"
    request.cachePolicy = NSURLRequestCachePolicy.ReloadIgnoringLocalAndRemoteCacheData
    request.timeoutInterval = 10.0

    NSURLConnection.sendAsynchronousRequest(request, queue:NSOperationQueue.mainQueue(), completionHandler:
    {(response: NSURLResponse!, data: NSData!, error: NSError!) -> Void in

        UIApplication.sharedApplication().networkActivityIndicatorVisible = false

        let rsp = response as NSHTTPURLResponse?

        completionHandler(internet:rsp?.statusCode == 200)
    })
}

func yourMethod()
{
    self.checkInternet(false, completionHandler:
    {(internet:Bool) -> Void in

        if (internet)
        {
            // "Internet" aka Google
        }
        else
        {
            // No "Internet" aka no Google
        }
    })
}

Objective C Code

typedef void(^connection)(BOOL);

- (void)checkInternet:(connection)block
{
    [UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = YES;

    NSURL *url = [NSURL URLWithString:@"http://www.google.com/"];
    NSMutableURLRequest *request = [NSMutableURLRequest requestWithURL:url];
    request.HTTPMethod = @"HEAD";
    request.cachePolicy = NSURLRequestReloadIgnoringLocalAndRemoteCacheData;
    request.timeoutInterval = 10.0;

    [NSURLConnection sendAsynchronousRequest:request
                                   queue:[NSOperationQueue mainQueue]
                       completionHandler:
     ^(NSURLResponse *response, NSData *data, NSError *connectionError)
     {
        [UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = NO;
         block([(NSHTTPURLResponse *)response statusCode] == 200);
     }];
}

- (void)yourMethod
{                  
    [self checkInternet:^(BOOL internet)
    {
         if (internet)
         {
             // "Internet" aka Google
         }
         else
         {
             // No "Internet" aka no Google
         }
    }];
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Seems like this is the fastest way –  Pavel Mar 21 '13 at 8:28
2  
Caution: In my experience, this solution doesn't work all the time. In many cases the response returned is 403, after taking its sweet time. This solution seemed perfect, but doesn't guarantee 100% results. –  Mustafa May 9 '13 at 7:54
10  
"No google , no internet" ?? –  Kiran Ruth R Oct 8 '13 at 5:29
3  
As of June 2014, this will fail in mainland China, owing to the Chinese government now completely blocking google.com. (google.cn works, though, but in mainland China, no baidu.com, no internet) Probably better to ping whatever server you need to be communicating with. –  prewett Jul 28 at 5:28

Accurate checking (Reachability Method):

Import:

#import "Reachability.h"

BOOL:

-(BOOL)CheckNetwork   {
ATReachability *Reachability = [ATReachability reachabilityWithHostName:@"www.google.com"];
NetworkStatus NetworkStatus = [Reachability currentReachabilityStatus];
return NetworkStatus; }

Check Code:

if([self CheckNetwork] == NotReachable) { /* No Network */ } else { /* Network */ }

Example:

- (void)webView:(UIWebView *)webView didFailLoadWithError:(NSError *)error {
    if([self CheckNetwork] == NotReachable) {
        /* No Network */ 
    } else { 
        /* Network */
    }
}

.

Or you could do (UIWebView Method):

-(IBAction)NetworkCheck {
    //Use this to "call" the check
    UIWebView *networkChecker = [[UIWebView alloc] init];
    [networkChecker loadRequest:[NSURLRequest requestWithURL:[NSURL URLWithString:@"http://www.google.com/"]]];
}

- (void)webView:(UIWebView *)webView didFailLoadWithError:(NSError *)error {
    NSString *checkError = [[error debugDescription] substringFromIndex:[[error debugDescription] length] -35];

    if ([checkError isEqualToString:@"\"Could not connect to the server.\"}"]) { /* No Network */ }
    if ([checkError isEqualToString:@"Could not connect to the server.\"}"]) { /* No Network */ }
    if ([checkError isEqualToString:@"\"connection appears to be offline.\"}"]) { /* No Network */ }
    if ([checkError isEqualToString:@"connection appears to be offline.\"}"]) { /* No Network */ }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Tip: Works great with SVProgressHUD ;) –  Aleksander Azizi May 30 '12 at 1:31

Apple provides a sample app which does exactly this:

Reachability

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4  
You should note that the Reachability sample only detects which interfaces are active, but not which ones have a valid connection to the internet. Applications should gracefully handle failure even when Reachability reports that everything is ready to go. –  rpetrich Jul 5 '09 at 11:17

Nice topic, a bit old but thanks anyway it helped me. Only the Reachability class has been updated. You can now use:

Reachability* reachability = [Reachability reachabilityWithHostName:@"www.apple.com"];
NetworkStatus remoteHostStatus = [reachability currentReachabilityStatus];

if(remoteHostStatus == NotReachable) { NSLog(@"not reachable");}
else if (remoteHostStatus == ReachableViaWWAN) { NSLog(@"reachable via wwan");}
else if (remoteHostStatus == ReachableViaWiFi) { NSLog(@"reachable via wifi");}
share|improve this answer
1  
Unless something changed since 4.0 was released, that code is not asynchronous and you are guaranteed to see it show up in Crash Reports - happened to me before. –  bpapa Aug 27 '10 at 15:10
1  
I agree with bpapa. It's not a good idea to use synchronous code. Thanks for the info though –  Brock Woolf Aug 27 '10 at 18:28

Here´s a version on Reachability for iOS 5, its not mine! =) https://gist.github.com/1182373

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There's a nice-looking, ARC- and GCD-using modernization of Reachability here:

Reachability

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I've used the code in this discussion, and it seems to work fine (read the whole thread!).

I haven't tested it exhaustively with every conceivable kind of connection (like ad hoc wifi).

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You have the reachability library, here made by apple just for this purpose.

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2  
Its generally not a good idea to copy-paste a library made by apple for copyright reasons. So, I linked to the project by apple instead. –  Richard J. Ross III Jan 13 '12 at 18:11

If you're using AFNetworking you can use its own implementation for internet reachability status.

The best way to use AFNetworking is to subclass the AFHTTPClient class and use this class to do your network connections.

One of the advantages of using this approach is that you can use blocks to set the desired behavior when the reachability status changes. Supposing that I've created a singleton subclass of AFHTTPClient (as said on the "Subclassing notes" on AFNetworking docs) named BKHTTPClient, I'd do something like:

BKHTTPClient *httpClient = [BKHTTPClient sharedClient];
[httpClient setReachabilityStatusChangeBlock:^(AFNetworkReachabilityStatus status)
{
    if (status == AFNetworkReachabilityStatusNotReachable) 
    {
    // Not reachable
    }
    else
    {
        // Reachable
    }
}];

You could also check for Wi-Fi or WLAN connections specifically using the AFNetworkReachabilityStatusReachableViaWWAN and AFNetworkReachabilityStatusReachableViaWiFi enums (more here).

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2  
By far the best solution, it needs more +1 –  MegaManX Nov 13 '13 at 21:23
- (void)viewWillAppear:(BOOL)animated
{
NSString *URL = [NSString stringWithContentsOfURL:[NSURL URLWithString:@"http://www.google.com"]];

return (URL != NULL ) ? YES : NO;
}

Or use Reachability class

There are two way to check internet availbility in iPhone SDK

1. Check the Google page is opened or not.

2. Reachability Class

For more information please refer the link Reachability

share|improve this answer
1  
There are two way to check internet availbility in iPhone SDK 1)Check the Google page is opened or not. –  IOS Rocks Nov 22 '12 at 12:04
1  
-1 : This is a synchronous method that will block the main thread (the one that the app UI is changed on) while it tries to connect to google.com. If your user is on a very slow data connection, the phone will act like the process is unresponsive. –  iWasRobbed Mar 25 '13 at 23:05

Very simple.... Try this steps

Step 1: Add SystemConfiguration framework into your project


Step 2: Import following code into your header file

#import <SystemConfiguration/SystemConfiguration.h>

Step 3: Use following method

      - Type 1:

- (BOOL) currentNetworkStatus {
    [UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = NO;
    BOOL connected;
    BOOL isConnected;
    const char *host = "www.apple.com";
    SCNetworkReachabilityRef reachability = SCNetworkReachabilityCreateWithName(NULL, host);
    SCNetworkReachabilityFlags flags;
    connected = SCNetworkReachabilityGetFlags(reachability, &flags);
    isConnected = NO;
    isConnected = connected && (flags & kSCNetworkFlagsReachable) && !(flags & kSCNetworkFlagsConnectionRequired);
    CFRelease(reachability);
    return isConnected;
}

      - Type 2:

Import header : #import "Reachability.h"

- (BOOL)currentNetworkStatus 
{
    Reachability *reachability = [Reachability reachabilityForInternetConnection];  
    NetworkStatus networkStatus = [reachability currentReachabilityStatus]; 
    return networkStatus != NotReachable;
}

Step 4: How to use..

- (void)CheckInternet
{
    BOOL network = [self currentNetworkStatus];
    if(network)
    {
        NSLog(@"Network Available");
    }
    else
    {
        NSLog(@"No Network Available");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
-(void)newtworkType {

 NSArray *subviews = [[[[UIApplication sharedApplication] valueForKey:@"statusBar"] valueForKey:@"foregroundView"]subviews];
NSNumber *dataNetworkItemView = nil;

for (id subview in subviews) {
    if([subview isKindOfClass:[NSClassFromString(@"UIStatusBarDataNetworkItemView") class]]) {
        dataNetworkItemView = subview;
        break;
    }
}


switch ([[dataNetworkItemView valueForKey:@"dataNetworkType"]integerValue]) {
    case 0:
        NSLog(@"No wifi or cellular");
        break;

    case 1:
        NSLog(@"2G");
        break;

    case 2:
        NSLog(@"3G");
        break;

    case 3:
        NSLog(@"4G");
        break;

    case 4:
        NSLog(@"LTE");
        break;

    case 5:
        NSLog(@"Wifi");
        break;


    default:
        break;
}
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Even if the device is connected to Wifi or some other network type, the internet connection can still be unavailable. Simple test: connect to your home wifi and then unplug your cable modem. Still connected to wifi, but zero internet. –  iWasRobbed Aug 22 '13 at 14:35

To do this yourself it is extremely simple. The following method will work just be sure to not allow hostname protocol such as http, https etc to be passed in with the name.

-(BOOL)hasInternetConnection:(NSString*)urlAddress
{
    SCNetworkReachabilityRef ref = SCNetworkReachabilityCreateWithName(kCFAllocatorDefault, [urlAddress UTF8String]);
    SCNetworkReachabilityFlags flags;
    if (!SCNetworkReachabilityGetFlags(ref, &flags))
    {
        return NO;
    }
    return flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsReachable;
}

Quick simple and painless.

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Reachability class is Ok to find out if the internet connection is available to device or not..

but in case of accessing an intranet resource

Pinging the intranet server with reachability class always returns true.

So quick solution in this scenario would be to create a web method called pingme along with other webmethods on service. The pingme should return something

so I wrote the following method on common functions

-(BOOL)PingServiceServer
{
    NSURL *url=[NSURL URLWithString:@"http://www.serveraddress/service.asmx/Ping"];


    NSMutableURLRequest *urlReq=[NSMutableURLRequest requestWithURL:url];

    [urlReq setTimeoutInterval:10];

    NSURLResponse *response;

    NSError *error = nil;

    NSData *receivedData = [NSURLConnection sendSynchronousRequest:urlReq
                                                 returningResponse:&response
                                                             error:&error];


    NSLog(@"receivedData:%@",receivedData);

    if(receivedData !=nil)
    {
        return YES;
    }
    else
    {
        NSLog(@"Data is null");
        return NO;
    }
}

The above method was so useful for me so whenever I try to send some data to server I always check the reachability of my intranet resource using this low timeout URLRequest

share|improve this answer

First : Add CFNetwork.framework in framework

Code: ViewController.m

#import "Reachability.h"

- (void)viewWillAppear:(BOOL)animated
{ 
    Reachability *r = [Reachability reachabilityWithHostName:@"www.google.com"];
    NetworkStatus internetStatus = [r currentReachabilityStatus];

    if ((internetStatus != ReachableViaWiFi) && (internetStatus != ReachableViaWWAN))
    {
        /// Create an alert if connection doesn't work
        UIAlertView *myAlert = [[UIAlertView alloc]initWithTitle:@"No Internet Connection"   message:NSLocalizedString(@"InternetMessage", nil)delegate:nil cancelButtonTitle:@"Ok" otherButtonTitles:nil];
        [myAlert show];
        [myAlert release];
    }
    else
    {    
         NSLog(@"INTERNET IS CONNECT");      
    }
}
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first download reachability class and put reachability.h and reachabilty.m file in your xcode. Best way is make common Functions class (NSObject) so that you can use it any class. These are two methods for network connection reachability check:

+(BOOL) reachabiltyCheck
{
    NSLog(@"reachabiltyCheck");
    BOOL status =YES;
    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self
                                             selector:@selector(reachabilityChanged:)
                                                 name:kReachabilityChangedNotification
                                               object:nil];
    Reachability * reach = [Reachability reachabilityForInternetConnection];
    NSLog(@"status : %d",[reach currentReachabilityStatus]);
    if([reach currentReachabilityStatus]==0)
    {
        status = NO;
        NSLog(@"network not connected");
    }
    reach.reachableBlock = ^(Reachability * reachability)
    {
        dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
        });
    };
    reach.unreachableBlock = ^(Reachability * reachability)
    {
        dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
        });
    };
    [reach startNotifier];
    return status;
}

+(BOOL)reachabilityChanged:(NSNotification*)note
{
    BOOL status =YES;
    NSLog(@"reachabilityChanged");
    Reachability * reach = [note object];
    NetworkStatus netStatus = [reach currentReachabilityStatus];
    switch (netStatus)
    {
        case NotReachable:
        {
            status = NO;
            NSLog(@"Not Reachable");
        }
        break;
        default:
        {
            if (!isSyncingReportPulseFlag)
            {
                status = YES;
                isSyncingReportPulseFlag = TRUE;
                [DatabaseHandler checkForFailedReportStatusAndReSync];
            }
        }
            break;
    }
    return status;
}
+ (BOOL) connectedToNetwork
{
    // Create zero addy
    struct sockaddr_in zeroAddress;
    bzero(&zeroAddress, sizeof(zeroAddress));
    zeroAddress.sin_len = sizeof(zeroAddress);
    zeroAddress.sin_family = AF_INET;
    // Recover reachability flags
    SCNetworkReachabilityRef defaultRouteReachability = SCNetworkReachabilityCreateWithAddress(NULL, (struct sockaddr *)&zeroAddress);
    SCNetworkReachabilityFlags flags;
    BOOL didRetrieveFlags = SCNetworkReachabilityGetFlags(defaultRouteReachability, &flags);
    CFRelease(defaultRouteReachability);
    if (!didRetrieveFlags)
    {
        NSLog(@"Error. Could not recover network reachability flags");
        return NO;
    }
    BOOL isReachable = flags & kSCNetworkFlagsReachable;
    BOOL needsConnection = flags & kSCNetworkFlagsConnectionRequired;
    BOOL nonWiFi = flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsTransientConnection;
    NSURL *testURL = [NSURL URLWithString:@"http://www.apple.com/"];
    NSURLRequest *testRequest = [NSURLRequest requestWithURL:testURL  cachePolicy:NSURLRequestReloadIgnoringLocalCacheData timeoutInterval:20.0];
    NSURLConnection *testConnection = [[NSURLConnection alloc] initWithRequest:testRequest delegate:self];
    return ((isReachable && !needsConnection) || nonWiFi) ? (testConnection ? YES : NO) : NO;
}

Now you can check network connection in any class by calling this class method.

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Use this one, it's easier than adding libraries and write code by your self. http://huytd.github.io/datatify/

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There is also an another method to check internet connection in iPhone SDK.

Try to implement the following code for Network Connection.

#import <SystemConfiguration/SystemConfiguration.h>
#include <netdb.h>

/**
 Checking for network availability,it returns YES it network available */
+ (BOOL) connectedToNetwork
{

    // Create zero addy
    struct sockaddr_in zeroAddress;
    bzero(&zeroAddress, sizeof(zeroAddress));
    zeroAddress.sin_len = sizeof(zeroAddress);
    zeroAddress.sin_family = AF_INET;

    // Recover reachability flags
    SCNetworkReachabilityRef defaultRouteReachability = SCNetworkReachabilityCreateWithAddress(NULL, (struct sockaddr *)&zeroAddress);    
    SCNetworkReachabilityFlags flags;

    BOOL didRetrieveFlags = SCNetworkReachabilityGetFlags(defaultRouteReachability, &flags);
    CFRelease(defaultRouteReachability);

    if (!didRetrieveFlags) 
    {
        printf("Error. Could not recover network reachability flags\n");
        return NO;
    }

    BOOL isReachable = ((flags & kSCNetworkFlagsReachable) != 0);
    BOOL needsConnection = ((flags & kSCNetworkFlagsConnectionRequired) != 0);

    return (isReachable && !needsConnection) ? YES : NO;

}
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Found a simple & easy to use library SimplePingHelper.
Sample code:- https://github.com/chrishulbert/SimplePingHelper

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1.Download Reachability file https://gist.github.com/darkseed/1182373

2.and Add CFNetwork.framework and 'SystemConfiguration.framework' in framework

  1. #import "Reachability.h" First : Add CFNetwork.framework in framework

Code: ViewController.m

- (void)viewWillAppear:(BOOL)animated
{ 
    Reachability *r = [Reachability reachabilityWithHostName:@"www.google.com"];
    NetworkStatus internetStatus = [r currentReachabilityStatus];

    if ((internetStatus != ReachableViaWiFi) && (internetStatus != ReachableViaWWAN))
    {
        /// Create an alert if connection doesn't work
        UIAlertView *myAlert = [[UIAlertView alloc]initWithTitle:@"No Internet Connection"   message:NSLocalizedString(@"InternetMessage", nil)delegate:nil cancelButtonTitle:@"Ok" otherButtonTitles:nil];
        [myAlert show];
        [myAlert release];
    }
    else
    {    
         NSLog(@"INTERNET IS CONNECT");      
    }
}
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Apart from reachability you may also use Simple Ping helper library works really nice and is simple to integrate.

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import "Reachability.h"

-(BOOL)netStat
{
    Reachability *test = [Reachability reachabilityForInternetConnection];
    return [test isReachable];
}
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I think this one is the best answer Yes mean connected No mean disconnected

#import "Reachability.h"

 - (BOOL)canAccessInternet 
{
    Reachability *IsReachable = [Reachability reachabilityForInternetConnection];
    NetworkStatus internetStats = [IsReachable currentReachabilityStatus];

    if (internetStats == NotReachable)
    {
        return NO;
    }
    else 
    {
        return YES;
    }
}
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get Reachabilty class from https://github.com/tonymillion/Reachability, add system configuration framework in your project, do import Reachability.h in your class and implement the custom methods as below:

- (BOOL)isConnectedToInternet
{
    //return NO; // force for offline testing
    Reachability *hostReach = [Reachability reachabilityForInternetConnection];
    NetworkStatus netStatus = [hostReach currentReachabilityStatus];
    return !(netStatus == NotReachable);
}
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3  
-1; adds nothing to this thread that the accepted answer doesn't already cover better, IMO. Also, your entire method body can just be replaced with return [[Reachability reachabilityForInternetConnection] isReachable]; –  Mark Amery Sep 17 '13 at 11:37

protected by Jeff Atwood Jan 24 '11 at 10:06

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