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I am trying to have my Node.js object cast events. Now this is not a problem if I make 'static' objects and instantiate them, but how do I do this when my object has no static grandpa, like when an object was created using object literal notation?

I am used to writing ExtJS syntax so I prefer everything in object literal.

// var EventEmitter = require('events').EventEmitter; // How where when?

myObject = {
  myFunction: function() {
    console.log('foo');
  },
  urFunction: function() {
    console.log('bar');
  }
};

This is an object. It does not have a constructor, because there don't need to be more instances.

Now how do I allow myObject to emit events?

I have tried and tried to adapt code, but I cannot get it to work without rewriting my object to a form with a constructor like so:

var EventEmitter = require('events').EventEmitter;
var util = require('util');

function myClass() {
  EventEmitter.call(this);

  myFunction: function() {
    this.emit('foo');
  },
  urFunction: function() {
    this.emit('bar');
  }
};

myClass.prototype = Object.create(EventEmitter.prototype);
// or // util.inherits(myClass, EventEmitter);
var myObject = new myClass; // Shouldn't be necessary for my single-instance case

Or adding my functions/prototypes to something constructed like so:

var EventEmitter = require('events').EventEmitter;
var util = require('util');

var myObject = new EventEmitter();
// or // var myObject = Object.create(new EventEmitter); // Dunno difference
myObject.myFunction = function() {
    this.emit('foo');
  },
myObject.urFunction = function() {
    this.emit('bar');
  }
};

util.inherits(myObject, EventEmitter);

How do I allow myObject to emit events, while keeping the object literal notation? So many confusing ways to do it, but not one within those JSON-like notated objects.

share|improve this question
    
Very good question, I like using Object.create() and literals from browser based environments but using node js for a while now, my conclusion is that ES5 like object handling is somewhat underused. Reason might be that functions like util.inherits do not exist for handling object literals. –  vanthome Mar 27 '13 at 13:31
    
Please see this answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/24925115/… –  victorwoo 7 hours ago

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why not use composition instead of inheritance?

var myObject = {
  myFunction: function() {
    console.log('foo');
  },
  urFunction: function() {
    console.log('bar');
  },
  emitter: new EventEmitter()
}
share|improve this answer
    
This looks interesting. Is the 'internal' emitter equally 'public' as when myObject would have been the emitter? E.g. I can do from within a root function self.myObject.emitter.on('customEvent', doSomethinG()); (provided ofcourse self = this is set in the same root)? –  Redsandro Jun 1 '12 at 13:14
1  
Yes. And if you want to make your object quack like an emitter, you can even add some of the emitter functions that you will use like `var myObject = { ... emitter: new EventEmitter(), emit: myObject.emitter.emit, on: myObject.emitter.on, ...} –  ziad-saab Jun 1 '12 at 13:17
    
Clever. Just curious on how versatile this is: Can I somehow pass an emitter from a separate function/scope and have the same fun? E.g. a nodejs request triggers onRequest() , which does something with myObject which causes events, which are listened to inside onRequest(). Now, a second (third and n th) simultaneous request do the same, but should only listen to events caused by their own fiddling with myObject. This would require onRequest() to pass a new emitter to myObject everytime, otherwise myObject's events will be caught by every running instance of onRequest(). –  Redsandro Jun 1 '12 at 17:32
    
I'm not sure I am grasping 100% of your last question. But look at it this way: you're inheriting of all the features of EventEmitter. But instead of inheriting them by extending EventEmitter, you're inheriting them by adding an EventEmitter as part of your object. –  ziad-saab Jun 1 '12 at 18:11
    
+1 perfect solution for what I am trying to do. –  Brandon May 4 at 18:13

Unfortunately, your desired object-literal syntax is not possible. It's because

var obj = {};

is equivalent to

var obj = Object.create(Object.prototype);

in that obj's prototype is fixed to Object.prototype at creation and you can't change that later on.

Since you just want a single instance, I'd argue that it does make sense to create an instance of EventEmitter and assign properties to it:

var EventEmitter = require('events').EventEmitter;
var obj = new EventEmitter();

obj.doStuff = function() {
  this.emit('stuff');
};

You don't need util.inherits here, as you just have one instance, so there's no chain to setup.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for explaining the part about the prototype. I only partially understood what was going on, and thought {} was a shorthand for defining and instantiating a constructor-less object. Do you know a more native way of assigning properties to the EventEmitter instance so that I can more easily port my object literals to them, as referenced in my first comment to Mattias Buelens? –  Redsandro Jun 1 '12 at 13:17
1  
I am not aware of a native way to extend via object literal. However, include jQuery is not ideal for a node.js project, since most of jQuery is about manipulating the DOM. I would suggest including a utility library like Lo-Dash or Underscore. You can install this with npm. –  jryans Jun 1 '12 at 19:04
    
Very good explanation but your proposed solution is not sensible if you create a reusable library. On that case you will not want to add functions after construction. –  vanthome Mar 27 '13 at 13:29

This is a completely wild guess, as I have only coded JavaScript for browsers. However, can't you just call EventEmitter on your object after creating your object literal?

myObject = {
    myFunction: function() {
        console.log('foo');
    },
    urFunction: function() {
        console.log('bar');
    }
};
EventEmitter.call(myObject);
share|improve this answer
    
I wish it was that simple, but unfortunately it doesn't work. A dirty way that mimics turning my object literal into an EventEmitter is by borrowing jQuery's extend() like so: var myObject = new EventEmitter(); $.extend(myClass, myObject); where myClass is my object literal. Obviously I'm looking for a more native way. –  Redsandro Jun 1 '12 at 0:55
    
Well, it was worth the try. –  Mattias Buelens Jun 1 '12 at 7:23

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