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I've seen a number of question's closed as "Not programming related" (e.g. http://stackoverflow.com/questions/397854/what-process-accesses-my-hdd)

I understand that their's several alternative site (stackoverflow) themed-forums and to attempt keep site question's to a minimum also some may argue that this is too subjective, o well, I got madly flamed for my first answer, so here's my first question, I'll try to frame it in a psudo-contextual-basis (jepordy style) to keep some regulator's at bay...

Is it not fair to #include UNIX systems's level discussion in the same realm as programming? One of the most usefull UNIX tools I've ever used, strace/trus/par, is based around system call information and reporting, other tools like ltrace can do similar things for libararies...

System admin, I agree is not for this forum, like "How to I make qmail do X?", but is "My smtp virus scanner is not fast enough, based on dnotify?" (answer) "Hey, use inotify", so easy to discreminate? The latter may either be shell or linux kernel system call's.

I am not much of one for standards (read one too many lately), I'm adding a tag on POSIX "command language", to shift some focus on idenitfying some definative info.

Systems level interaction being somewhat of a programming-interface(API)/user-interface(shell) duality (perticularly for UNIX).

If the context of an inquisitor be primarially interface based and it is an easy quarry (or even typical) to solution an exclusivly programming/API responce, to help man and machiene alike, why require a domain change (body of knowledge or URL domain;)?

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closed as off topic by sth, Burkhard, Richard, jalf, dmckee Jul 5 '09 at 13:49

Questions on Stack Overflow are expected to relate to programming within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
+1 Good question that should not be closed and does not belong on meta. It should be wiki, though. –  balpha Jul 5 '09 at 9:27
    
Why wouldn't it belong on meta.stackoverflow.com ? Isn't this the very definition of a meta-question? –  sth Jul 5 '09 at 9:37
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It's a meta-programming question ("When is it programming") and not a meta-SO question. Although the answer has implications on the "What belongs here?" meta-SO question, these are secondary. –  balpha Jul 5 '09 at 9:42
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It might be a metaprogramming question, but then it doesn't belong on SO either. SO is for programming questions, not for "do you think this is programming?" questions. Honestly, this reads more like a blog post than a programming-related question to me. –  jalf Jul 5 '09 at 10:57
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By the way, it might just be me, but your "jeopardy style" is virtually unreadable, and I don't see how it is going to keep anyone at bay. If you want to keep people from closing your question, you should try to make it clear what you're asking, not obfuscate it. and interleave it with your own answers and prejudices. –  jalf Jul 5 '09 at 11:25

4 Answers 4

I'm sorry, I don't understand the distinction you appear to be trying to draw between UNIX and Windows. As someone who uses and programs both of them, the distinction about whether a call to a kernel service is in a library or not seems unimportant. The distinction is - is the call made in a programming context? For example, questions about the UNIX cat command do not, I suggest, belong here, whereas questions about the UNIX read() system call, which cat must use at some level, do.

Oh, and there is no "tight integration" between the kernel and the shell.

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Is it not fair to #include UNIX systems's level discussion in the same realm as programming? One of the most usefull UNIX tools I've ever used, strace/trus/par, is based around system call information and reporting, other tools like ltrace can do similar things for libararies...

Discussion of debugging tools is perfectly valid on SO, IMO. I've not seen a debugging tools question closed.

So if the closed question you reference had been 'how do I find what processes are touching files for debugging my program', then I imagine it wouldn't have been closed. But it appeared to be 'how do I find what processes are touching files to improve the ambience of my bedroom', which isn't programming related.

Sysadmin questions belong elsewhere. Bash programming is programming related, system utilities aren't. It's just the same as 'how do I make Word format my document in three columns' isn't programming related, but 'how do I program a VB script to format my Word document' is.

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I think if you asked the same question today it would also be closed. But rather than "not programming related", it would be "belongs on server fault".

If your question had been, I want to trace the files my program touches, i.e. specifcally related to development work, then it would be marginal.

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The thing is, the point I'm trying to make, is sure, a Windows user asking this question, "Hey ya dood, use program X,y,Z from system-admin-guys.downloads.com". However, the API/system-tool's, for some, granted not all, but many tasks in UNIX are typically simple reference implmentations of the API in the first place. –  RandomNickName42 Jul 5 '09 at 10:48
    
The same is often true in Windows, many of the tools are just API wrappers (look at most of the PowerShell cmdlets), and many library functions are also pretty simple. The issue is not UNIX vs. Windows, it is SysAdmin vs. Developer (who and why is the tool being used). Process Monitor (the answer to your original question if it were on Windows) can be an answer bother here and on ServerFault. –  Richard Jul 5 '09 at 12:15

System admin, I agree is not for this forum, like "How to I make qmail do X?", but is "My smtp virus scanner is not fast enough, based on dnotify?" (answer) "Hey, use inotify", so easy to discreminate? The latter may either be shell or linux kernel system call's.

We don't need to discriminate. If someone is writing a smtp virus scanner, that is a programming task, and questions about how to do it are programming questions. Then it doesn't matter if it is written in bash, assembly or C++ or Whitespace.

On the other hand, asking "how do I see which processes are running on Unix?" is not a programming question. Yes, the answer will be to use a command which is basically a wrapper around a system call, and so what? The MS Word "save file" dialog is a wrapper around a write file system call too. That doesn't make it programming-related.

I don't really see the problem.

Is it not the case that UNIX systems related questions are programming questions? If not, where is the boundry between a programming/scripting language and user interface?

The boundary is here: "Is the question made in a programming context?" A end-user asking how to use some Unix command is not a programming question. But a programmer asking how to make his program do something on Unix, is programming-related.

It doesn't matter that the shell command and the system call are basically identical. If it is invoked from a programming context, it is programming-related. Otherwise it is not. We can even make the same distinction on Windows. If I ask "How should I call CreateFile from my Python program", that is clearly programming-related. But "The program I was running crashed, and gave me an error message saying CreateFile failed. What does that mean?" is not programming-related.

One is asked from a programming context, the other simply happens to include the name of a system call.

If you're in doubt, here's Wikipedia's definition of "programming":

Computer programming (often shortened to programming or coding) is the process of writing, testing, debugging/troubleshooting, and maintaining the source code of computer programs

That seems pretty clear to me. Are you reading/writing source code? If not, it's hardly programming. Being the user of a utility that was created through programming is enough.

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