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This is my first time posting on Stack Overflow, so hopefully I did everything right and you guys can help.

I'm wondering if in C# there's a way to access a static variable belonging to a class, when given only the type of the class. For example:

public class Foo
{
    public static int bar = 0;
}

public class Main
{
    public void myFunc(Type givenType)
    {
        int tempInt = ??? // Get the value of the variable "bar" from "Foo"
        Debug.WriteLine("Bar is currently :" + tempInt);
    }
}

// I didn't run this code through a compiler, but its simple enough
// that hopefully you should get the idea...

It's hard to describe the context of needing to know this, but I'm making a game in XNA and I'm trying to use reference counting to reduce the complexity of the design. I have objects in the game and power-ups that can apply an effect them (that stays on the objects). Power-ups can die but their effects can still linger on the objects, and I need to keep track of if any effects from a power-up are still lingering on objects (thus, reference counting). I plan to make a "PowerUpEffect" class (for each type of power-up) with a static integer saving the number of objects still affected by it, but the design of the rest of the game doesn't work well with passing the PowerUpEffect all the way down to the object for it to call a method of the PowerUpEffect class.

I'm hoping to pass only the PowerUpEffect's type (using something like "typeOf()") and use that type to reference static variables belonging to those types, but I have no idea how to do it or if it's even possible.

I'd be glad to even find work-arounds that don't answer this questions directly but solve the problem in a simple and elegant design. =)

Help! (and thanks!)

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2  
Reflection will get you what you want here, but instead of using reflection for something like this, you might want to think of using Singleton pattern instead. –  antlersoft May 31 '12 at 17:04

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you only have the Type handle, you can do this:

var prop = givenType.GetProperty("bar");
var value = prop.GetValue(null);
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That's exactly what I wanted to do! (with the exception of "var") Perfect, thanks –  KeithA45 Jun 3 '12 at 1:41

I would use a Dictionary instead, which are probably the most concise way of mapping one set of values to another. If you are associating int values with Types, then do something like:

public static readonly Dictionary<Type, int> sTypeValues =
   new Dictionary<Type, int>
{
   { typeof(Type1), 5 },
   { typeof(Type2), 10 },
   { typeof(Type3), 2 },
   { typeof(Type4), 3 },
   { typeof(Type5), -7 }
};

your function then becomes:

public void myFunc(Type givenType)
{
    int tempInt = sTypeValues[givenType];
    Debug.WriteLine("Bar is currently :" + tempInt);
}
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While this wasn't the answer I was going for, after some further review of the code, this is the type of solution I'm going to use. Thanks for your help –  KeithA45 Jun 3 '12 at 1:44

int tempInt = (int) givenType.GetField("bar").GetValue(null);

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Perfect, that's what I wanted to do. Thanks –  KeithA45 Jun 3 '12 at 1:41

Okay, so you have a collection of powerups, and you want to have an integer associated with each of those powerups. Rather than having a lot of classes, each with a static integer, you can have a single static collection which holds onto all of the powerups and their associated integer values.

public static class MyPowerupInfo
{
  public static Dictionary<PowerUp, int> PowerUps {get; private set;}
  static MyPowerupInfo
  {
    PowerUps = new Dictionary<PowerUp, int>();
    PowerUps.Add(*some power up object goes here*, 0);
    //TODO add other power ups
  }
}

Then to use it you can do something like:

int powerupCount = MyPowerupInfo.PowerUps[wickedAwesomePowerup];

or:

public static void IncrementPowerup(Powerup powerup)
{
  MyPowerupInfo.PowerUps[powerup] = MyPowerupInfo.PowerUps[powerup]+1;
}
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@downvoter, care to explain? –  Servy Jun 1 '12 at 13:35
    
Believe it or not, while this wasn't the exact answer I was going for, after further review, this is the type of solution I'm going with. Thanks! –  KeithA45 Jun 3 '12 at 1:43

If am getting you correc, this might give you some idea:

using System; using System.Reflection;

public class RStatic
{
    private static int SomeNumber {get; set;}
    public static object SomeReference {get; set;}
    static RStatic()
    {
        SomeReference = new object();
        Console.WriteLine(SomeReference.GetHashCode());
    }
}

public class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        var rs = new RStatic();
        var pi = rs.GetType().GetProperty("SomeReference",  BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public); // i have used GetProperty in my case

        Console.WriteLine(pi.GetValue(rs, null).GetHashCode());


    }
}
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Are you assuming if the name of the field you're trying to access (for example, for the class "foo", the field "bar") is a different field based on the Type parameter?

If the name of the field is known based on a finite number of allowable types, you should be able to determine it with a switch statement. For example:

public class Foo
{
    public static int bar = 0;
}

public class Baz
{
    public static int bing = 0;
}

public class Main
{
    public void myFunc(Type givenType)
    {
        switch (givenType.ToString())
        {
            case "Foo":
                Debug.WriteLine("Bar is currently :" + Foo.bar);
                break;
            case "Baz":
                Debug.WriteLine("Bing is currently :" + Baz.bing);
                break;
        }
    }
}
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