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I am using the Struts2 framework and have the following method in a POJO class.

public String execute() {
    setUserPrincipal();
    //do something
    someMethod(getUserPrincipal().getLoggedInUserId());
    return SUCCESS;
}

the setUserPrincipal() method looks like this

public void setUserPrincipal() {
    this.principal = (UserPrincipal) getServletRequest().getSession().getAttribute("principal");
}

Basically it is simply taking a session attribute named "principal" and setting it so that I can find out who the logged in user is. The call to setUserPrincipal() to do this is quite common in most of my POJOs and it also becomes a hassle when testing the method because I have to set a session attribute.

Is there a way to automatically inject the session attribute into the POJO either using Spring or something else?

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There is a Spring-Struts2 integration module, that can help. By the way you could use Spring Security, and then access the principal everywhere in your code. –  Amir Pashazadeh May 31 '12 at 21:00

2 Answers 2

I've only used Struts2 a bit, but they have an interceptor stack that you can tie to particular actions. You can create your own interceptor that injects the session variable.

public interface UserAware 
{
   void setUserPrincipal(String principal);
}

// Make your actions implement UserAware

public class MyInterceptor implements Interceptor
{
   public String intercept(ActionInvocation inv) throws Exception
   {
      UserAware action = (UserAware) inv.getAction();
      String principal = inv.getInvocationContext().getSession().get("principal");
      action.setUserPrincipal(principal);

      return inv.invoke();
   }
}

Like I said, not much Struts2 experience so this is untested but I think the idea is there.

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Don't know about injecting the session, but maybe having a piece of AOP code that sets principal before execute.

Here's some documentation:

http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/2.5.x/reference/aop.html

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