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If I have a class like this:

public class Foo
{
    public IEnumerable<Bar> Bars { get; set; }

    public Foo()
    {
        Bars = new List<Bar>();
    }
}

At some stage I re-factor the class and add a secondary constructor which implements the first one like this:

public class Foo
{
    public IEnumerable<Bar> Bars { get; set; }

    // some more properties were added

    public Foo()
    {
        Bars = new List<Bar>();
    }

    public Foo(string parameter): this()
    {
        .... some code here
    }
}

I could have also written it similar to this:

public class Foo
{
    public IEnumerable<Bar> Bars { get; set; }

    // some more properties were added too

    public Foo()
    {
        InitilizeFoo();
    }

    public Foo(string parameter)
    {
        InitilizeFoo();
        .... some code here
    }

    private void InitializeFoo()
    {
        Bars = new List<Bar>();
    }
}

Seeing both approaches work in this scenario, is there a benefit or drawback in using one over the other?

Is inheriting constrcutors more efficient and making that code execute faster or is there a drawback which I don't know about making the second implementation more efficient instead?

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1  
I use both. When it makes sense to chain constructors together, I do it; but sometimes (example is not coming to mind) I have gone with the InitializeFoo() method and called it from all constructors. –  Nate May 31 '12 at 17:21
    
Exception safety is about the only thing I'd worry about. –  Kuba Ober May 31 '12 at 19:17
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5 Answers

up vote 28 down vote accepted

One of the key benefits in having one constructor call another constructor is that you can set read-only fields that way, you can't do that by calling a non-constructor method.

For example:

public class Foo
{
    private readonly int myNumber;

    public Foo() : this(42)
    {
    }

    public Foo(int num)
    {
        myNumber = num;
    }
}

Performance wise, it's probably no more or less efficient to call another constructor than to call another method, but it is more readable, in my opinion, for a constructor to call another constructor than to call a separate, private method whose only point is to be called by a constructor.

There could, of course, be situations when having a separate method makes sense, and it's certainly not "wrong" per se. Chaining constructors just reads better to many for most uses, and there is no negative performance impact.

UPDATE: I performed 10,000,000 iterations of each way (chained vs private initialization method) and the results were so close they were nearly indistinguishable:

Initializer Method took: 84 ms for 10,000,000 iterations, 8.4E-06 ms/each.
Chained Constructors took: 81 ms for 10,000,000 iterations, 8.1E-06 ms/each.

So really, performance-wise there is nearly no benefit either way. The main benefit is with chained constructors you can set readonly fields, and in most cases it is more readable.

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thank you very much for the quick response. I totally agree that this and most design descitions are situational and sometimes it just works better another way. My main concern was regarding performance, impacting compile or execution time. You have addressed that nicely, thank you very much. –  François Wahl May 31 '12 at 17:32
2  
Anytime! As with anything, it would be really easy to write a small test and use System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch() to measure a few million iterations of each... –  James Michael Hare May 31 '12 at 17:33
    
We had an issue in work for which the fix I applied was just that : this(). I was a little concerned about the fix and possible efficiency issues. I never thought about writing a quick test instead. Thanks for pointing that out. I will most certainly give it a try... after work :). –  François Wahl May 31 '12 at 17:38
2  
@FrançoisWahl: I ran a quick performance test of each, the results varied per run a few ms either way, but in general they were nearly identical every time... see update above. –  James Michael Hare May 31 '12 at 17:41
    
If I had not already +1ed you I would +1 you again. Thanks for that, realy appreaciate the effort. –  François Wahl May 31 '12 at 17:42
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Chaining constructors is a good way to enforce SRP and program flow. Hiding initialization code inside a standalone Initialize() function could make sense if there are other situations in the object lifecycle where you might also want to "Initialize" it; perhaps if you wanted to be able to quickly instantiate and lazy-initialize it. But if the only valid time in the lifecycle to execute that functionality is during instantiation, and initialization is a well-defined set of discrete steps that need to be taken in order, then chaining facilitates that.

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I never though of SRP, that is a very good point. –  François Wahl May 31 '12 at 17:28
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The key is to reduce the amount of duplicate code. In this case, calling the base constructor from a parameterized constructor reduces the chances of adding a bug later on after forgetting to update both of them.

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1  
If both constructors call the same Init method this issue is already addressed. It appears that's what the OP is comparing the code with. –  Servy May 31 '12 at 17:36
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A benefit of having an Initialise() function is in case you would like to reset your object - you can simply call the init function again rather than delete & recreate the object.

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2  
+1. For why Initialize approach could be useful. Note I'd try to redesign the class to avoid it - if instance shared between multiple other objects one may need to provide coordination code to notify about such significant change in state of the object. –  Alexei Levenkov May 31 '12 at 17:27
    
Nice one. That's very helpful when deciding which implementation to go for. Thank you. –  François Wahl May 31 '12 at 17:33
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I may get burned for saying this but I prefer using default parameters in this case:

public Foo(string parameter = null)
{

}

I've had cases where I had 10 - 15 optional parameters and having 15 different constructors wasn't an elegant solution in my opinion. I think default parameters were only reintroduced in the 4.0 framework though.

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