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I've found that != and == are not the fastest ways for testing for zero or non-zero.

bool nonZero1 = integer != 0;
xor eax, eax
test ecx, ecx
setne al

bool nonZero2 = integer < 0 || integer > 0;
test ecx, ecx
setne al

bool zero1 = integer == 0;
xor eax, eax
test ecx, ecx
sete al

bool zero2 = !(integer < 0 || integer > 0);
test ecx, ecx
sete al

Compiler: VC++ 11 Optimization flags: /O2 /GL /LTCG

This is the assembly output for x86-32. The second versions of both comparisons were ~12% faster on both x86-32 and x86-64. However, on x86-64 the instructions were identical (first versions looked exactly like the second versions), but the second versions were still faster.

  1. Why doesn't the compiler generate the faster version on x86-32?
  2. Why are the second versions still faster on x86-64 when the assembly output is identical?

EDIT: I've added benchmarking code. ZERO: 1544ms, 1358ms NON_ZERO: 1544ms, 1358ms http://pastebin.com/m7ZSUrcP or http://anonymouse.org/cgi-bin/anon-www.cgi/http://pastebin.com/m7ZSUrcP

Note: It's probably inconvenient to locate these functions when compiled in a single source file, because main.asm goes quite big. I had zero1, zero2, nonZero1, nonZero2 in a separate source file.

EDIT2: Could someone with both VC++11 and VC++2010 installed run the benchmarking code and post the timings? It might indeed be a bug in VC++11.

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11  
Would you provide the complete program you are using to benchmark the performance? –  James McNellis May 31 '12 at 17:56
    
So how does it guarantee the rest of eax is zero if it's just skipping the xor? –  harold May 31 '12 at 17:57
1  
Where are the xor instructions coming from? They don't look relevant to the test, so it should be part of the surrounding code. –  Mark Ransom May 31 '12 at 17:58
2  
What happens if you change the order? The compiler is smart enough to know that it has xor:ed eax before the first test and that that remains valid for the next... –  Andreas Magnusson May 31 '12 at 18:02
2  
NFRCR, did you really benchmark that as linear code? I assumed you just pasted them together to keep the size of the post down. –  harold May 31 '12 at 18:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 18 down vote accepted

EDIT: Saw OP's assembly listing for my code. I doubt this is even a general bug with VS2011 now. This may simply be a special case bug for OP's code. I ran OP's code as-is with clang 3.2, gcc 4.6.2 and VS2010 and in all cases the max differences were at ~1%.

Just compiled the sources with suitable modifications to my ne.c file and the /O2 and /GL flags. Here's the source

int ne1(int n) {
 return n != 0;
 }

 int ne2(int n) {
 return n < 0 || n > 0;
 }

 int ne3(int n) {
 return !(n == 0);
 }

int main() { int p = ne1(rand()), q = ne2(rand()), r = ne3(rand());}

and the corresponding assembly:

    ; Listing generated by Microsoft (R) Optimizing Compiler Version 16.00.30319.01 

    TITLE   D:\llvm_workspace\tests\ne.c
    .686P
    .XMM
    include listing.inc
    .model  flat

INCLUDELIB OLDNAMES

EXTRN   @__security_check_cookie@4:PROC
EXTRN   _rand:PROC
PUBLIC  _ne3
; Function compile flags: /Ogtpy
;   COMDAT _ne3
_TEXT   SEGMENT
_n$ = 8                         ; size = 4
_ne3    PROC                        ; COMDAT
; File d:\llvm_workspace\tests\ne.c
; Line 11
    xor eax, eax
    cmp DWORD PTR _n$[esp-4], eax
    setne   al
; Line 12
    ret 0
_ne3    ENDP
_TEXT   ENDS
PUBLIC  _ne2
; Function compile flags: /Ogtpy
;   COMDAT _ne2
_TEXT   SEGMENT
_n$ = 8                         ; size = 4
_ne2    PROC                        ; COMDAT
; Line 7
    xor eax, eax
    cmp eax, DWORD PTR _n$[esp-4]
    sbb eax, eax
    neg eax
; Line 8
    ret 0
_ne2    ENDP
_TEXT   ENDS
PUBLIC  _ne1
; Function compile flags: /Ogtpy
;   COMDAT _ne1
_TEXT   SEGMENT
_n$ = 8                         ; size = 4
_ne1    PROC                        ; COMDAT
; Line 3
    xor eax, eax
    cmp DWORD PTR _n$[esp-4], eax
    setne   al
; Line 4
    ret 0
_ne1    ENDP
_TEXT   ENDS
PUBLIC  _main
; Function compile flags: /Ogtpy
;   COMDAT _main
_TEXT   SEGMENT
_main   PROC                        ; COMDAT
; Line 14
    call    _rand
    call    _rand
    call    _rand
    xor eax, eax
    ret 0
_main   ENDP
_TEXT   ENDS
END

ne2() which used the <, > and || operators is clearly more expensive. ne1() and ne3() which use the == and != operators respectively, are terser and equivalent.

Visual Studio 2011 is in beta. I would consider this as a bug. My tests with two other compilers namely gcc 4.6.2 and clang 3.2, with the O2 optimization switch yielded the exact same assembly for all three tests (that I had) on my Windows 7 box. Here's a summary:

$ cat ne.c

#include <stdbool.h>
bool ne1(int n) {
    return n != 0;
}

bool ne2(int n) {
    return n < 0 || n > 0;
}

bool ne3(int n) {
    return !(n != 0);
}

int main() {}

yields with gcc:

_ne1:
LFB0:
    .cfi_startproc
    movl    4(%esp), %eax
    testl   %eax, %eax
    setne   %al
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
LFE0:
    .p2align 2,,3
    .globl  _ne2
    .def    _ne2;   .scl    2;  .type   32; .endef
_ne2:
LFB1:
    .cfi_startproc
    movl    4(%esp), %edx
    testl   %edx, %edx
    setne   %al
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
LFE1:
    .p2align 2,,3
    .globl  _ne3
    .def    _ne3;   .scl    2;  .type   32; .endef
_ne3:
LFB2:
    .cfi_startproc
    movl    4(%esp), %ecx
    testl   %ecx, %ecx
    sete    %al
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
LFE2:
    .def    ___main;    .scl    2;  .type   32; .endef
    .section    .text.startup,"x"
    .p2align 2,,3
    .globl  _main
    .def    _main;  .scl    2;  .type   32; .endef
_main:
LFB3:
    .cfi_startproc
    pushl   %ebp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 8
    .cfi_offset 5, -8
    movl    %esp, %ebp
    .cfi_def_cfa_register 5
    andl    $-16, %esp
    call    ___main
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    leave
    .cfi_restore 5
    .cfi_def_cfa 4, 4
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
LFE3:

and with clang:

    .def     _ne1;
    .scl    2;
    .type   32;
    .endef
    .text
    .globl  _ne1
    .align  16, 0x90
_ne1:
    cmpl    $0, 4(%esp)
    setne   %al
    movzbl  %al, %eax
    ret

    .def     _ne2;
    .scl    2;
    .type   32;
    .endef
    .globl  _ne2
    .align  16, 0x90
_ne2:
    cmpl    $0, 4(%esp)
    setne   %al
    movzbl  %al, %eax
    ret

    .def     _ne3;
    .scl    2;
    .type   32;
    .endef
    .globl  _ne3
    .align  16, 0x90
_ne3:
    cmpl    $0, 4(%esp)
    sete    %al
    movzbl  %al, %eax
    ret

    .def     _main;
    .scl    2;
    .type   32;
    .endef
    .globl  _main
    .align  16, 0x90
_main:
    pushl   %ebp
    movl    %esp, %ebp
    calll   ___main
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    popl    %ebp
    ret

My suggestion would be to file this as a bug with Microsoft Connect.

Note: I compiled them as C source since I don't think using the corresponding C++ compiler would make any significant change here.

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1  
Your new test is messed up, the compiler performed constant propagation, since it determined n = 10 always. And then, on top of that, it eliminated the function calls entirely, since the result wasn't used and there are no side effects. –  Ben Voigt May 31 '12 at 18:28
1  
Of course it is a bug. –  hirschhornsalz May 31 '12 at 18:45
1  
@dirkgently: When it comes to optimizer questions, context is everything. –  Ben Voigt May 31 '12 at 19:24
4  
IT'S NOT A BUG! How can it be a bug if the compiled code behaves as it should? It shows that there is room for improvement in the optimiser, but there's room for improvement in every optimiser. (That's a theorem, by the way.) –  TonyK May 31 '12 at 19:45
1  
Visual C++ bugs may be reported on Microsoft Connect. –  James McNellis May 31 '12 at 20:04

This is a great question, but I think you've fallen victim to the compiler's dependency analysis.

The compiler only has to clear the high bits of eax once, and they remain clear for the second version. The second version would have to pay the price to xor eax, eax except that the compiler analysis proved it's been left cleared by the first version.

The second version is able to "cheat" by taking advantage of work the compiler did in the first version.

How are you measuring times? Is it "(version one, followed by version two) in a loop", or "(version one in a loop) followed by (version two in a loop)"?

Don't do both tests in the same program (instead recompile for each version), or if you do, test both "version A first" and "version B first" and see if whichever comes first is paying a penalty.


Illustration of the cheating:

timer1.start();
double x1 = 2 * sqrt(n + 37 * y + exp(z));
timer1.stop();
timer2.start();
double x2 = 31 * sqrt(n + 37 * y + exp(z));
timer2.stop();

If timer2 duration is less than timer1 duration, we don't conclude that multiplying by 31 is faster than multiplying by 2. Instead, we realize that the compiler performed common subexpression analysis, and the code became:

timer1.start();
double common = sqrt(n + 37 * y + exp(z));
double x1 = 2 * common;
timer1.stop();
timer2.start();
double x2 = 31 * common;
timer2.stop();

And the only thing proved is that multiplying by 31 is faster than computing common. Which is hardly surprising at all -- multiplication is far far faster than sqrt and exp.

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7  
If only I could +2.. Well done on the second half. –  Drise May 31 '12 at 18:07
    
Benchmarking code added. I ran benchmark1 and benchmark2 separately, same results. The only difference is the first benchmark that runs, then it "warms up" and is a bit slower. –  NFRCR May 31 '12 at 18:20
2  
@Matt: Not for floating-point multiplication it wouldn't ;) For integer multiplication, yes I think most compilers know that trick, but depending on architecture it may or may not be faster. IMUL by two is almost certainly converted to a left shift. –  Ben Voigt May 31 '12 at 18:30
1  
@BenVoigt Oh I see you're using the C++11 auto. I for some reason assumed it was int. I seem to think that using auto to automatically choose the type is bad style and decreases readability. –  Matt May 31 '12 at 18:33
2  
@BenVoigt I never said it makes a difference. I think it is just easier to read (for humans) when you write double x1 = ... since you don't have to analyze the expression. –  Matt May 31 '12 at 18:41

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