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Is there any difference between these two:

var test1 = function () {
    this.method1 = function() {}
}

and

var test2 = function() {};
test2.method1 = function() {};
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4  
Yes. Syntax error: var test2 = function(); – diolemo May 31 '12 at 18:00
    
@diolemo I fixed the syntax error. – Triptych May 31 '12 at 18:01
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The first snippet takes this object, whatever it is, and assigns a function to its slot (field) named method1. this can represent different objects, depending upon how test1 is called:

  • when called as a standalone function -- test1() -- this will be window
  • when called as a constructor -- new test1() -- this refers to the object being created
  • when called via call or apply -- test1.apply(someObject) -- this refers to the argument

The second snippet takes the object test2 and assigns a function to its slot named method1.

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The first way is a constructor that creates more objects and needs to have the new keyword:

var mytest1 = new test1();
mytest1.method1();

The second way is ready to use right away:

test2.method1();
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4  
Note that test1 is not necessarily a constructor. It could be used as one, but it could also be intended to run in the context of an existing object. – apsillers May 31 '12 at 18:04

Assuming syntax was correct, the first is a constructor that gives all test1 objects created via new test1() a method called method1. The second just adds a function to the constructor object. In javascript, functions are objects which can have properties (including methods).

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The first version actually creates a method available to all objects instantiated like so:

var o = new test1();
o.test1();

The second simply attached a function as an attribute on the test2 function. If you're familiar with other class-based OO languages, this works kinda like a static method. You will not have access to the this pointer in the second example.

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The first one:

var test1 = function () {
    this.method1 = function() {}

}

Defines the function "test1". Once (and only when) "test1" is called, "this.method1" will be defined as a function, that does nothing.

The second:

var test2 = function() {};
test2.method1 = function() {};

Create the function "test2" and at the same time defines the function "test2.method1", without the need to invoke the first function.

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The first one sets the method1 property on whatever invokes test1().

The second one defines an empty function and sets the method1 property on test2

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