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I'm using a window function to compute a sequence number:

SELECT  R.ENCOUNTER_ID,
        M.MEASURE_ID,
        M.TAKEN_TIME,
        M.VALUE,
        row_number() OVER(PARTITION BY R.ENCOUNTER_ID, M.MEASURE_ID ORDER BY R.ENCOUNTER_ID, M.MEASURE_ID, TAKEN_TIME ASC) AS SEQ

FROM RECORD R 
INNER JOIN MEASURE M ON R.ABC_ID=M.ABC_ID

The RECORD table has a unique index on ABC_ID and a non-unique index on ENCOUNTER_ID.

The MEASURE table has a unique index on ABC_ID and LINE (not used in the query).

An explain plan on the query WITHOUT the row_number() gives the following:

HASH JOIN                 119702
TABLE ACCESS RECORD FULL  278
TABLE ACCESS MEASURE FULL 50696

An explain plan on the query WITH the row_number() gives the following:

WINDOW                    377871
HASH JOIN                 119702
TABLE ACCESS RECORD FULL  278
TABLE ACCESS MEASURE FULL 50696

It seems that a cross-table index would help (on R.ENCOUNTER_ID and M.MEASURE_ID), but I'm not sure that it is supported.

I don't know the frequency that the tables' statistics are updated.

Is there a way to get better performance on my window function? Could each table benefit from additional indices?

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1  
This may be optimized out behind the scenes already, or may not help, but I don't think you need R.ENCOUNTER_ID and M.MEASURE_ID in the ORDER BY because they're already in the PARTITION BY. Within each partition, the values in each column will all be the same. –  Brian Camire Jun 1 '12 at 1:06

1 Answer 1

The high cost after the hash join suggests that your hash join is spilling to disk, as it usually adds a negligible cost. Use DBMS_Xplan to get the estimate of the temp space required.

If you're memory constrained on the hash join then the window function is also going to suffer from memory shortage. Monitor v$sql_workarea to see if you have a multipass sort, and consider increasing the memory allocation during this query.

As for the indexing, I doubt that there is much you can do.

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