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I am developing a graphical installer for our application. Since none of the available installer generators meet the requirements and constraints, I am building it from scratch.

The installer is supposed to run on several operating systems, and therefore the path handling needs to be OS-agnostic. I have written the following small utility for this purpose:

public class Path {
  private Path() {
  }

  public static String join(String... pathElements) {
    return ListEnhancer.wrap(Arrays.asList(pathElements)).
      mkString(File.separator);
  }

  public static String concatOsSpecific(String path, String element) {
    return path + File.separator + element;
  }

  public static String concatOsAgnostic(String path, String element) {
    return path + "/" + element;
  }

  public static String makeOsAgnostic(String path) {
    return path.replace(File.separator, "/");
  }

  public static String makeOsSpecific(String path) {
    return new File(path).getAbsolutePath();
  }

  public static String fileName(String path) {
    return new File(path).getName();
  }
}

Now my code is littered with Path.*Agnostic and Path.*Specific calls in many places. As is apparent, this is very error-prone and not transparent at all.

What approach should I take to make the path handling transparent and less error-prone? Do there exist any utilities/libraries that already address this problem? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

EDIT:

To exemplify what I mean, here is some code I wrote a while ago. (Offtopic: Forgive the long-ish method. The code is in initial stages, and will be undergoing some heavy refactoring soon.)

Some context: ApplicationContext is an object that stores the installation data. That includes several paths such as installationRootDirectory, installationDirectory etc. The defaults for these are specified when creating an installer, and hence are always stored in OS-agnostic formats.

@Override
protected void initializeComponents() {
  super.initializeComponents();
  choosePathLabel = new JLabel("Please select the installation path:");
  final ApplicationContext c = installer.getAppContext();
  pathTextField = new JTextField(
    Path.makeOsSpecific(c.getInstallationDirectory()));
  browseButton = new JButton("Browse", 
    new ImageIcon("resources/images/browse.png"));
  browseButton.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
    @Override
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
      JFileChooser fileChooser = new JFileChooser();
      fileChooser.setFileSelectionMode(JFileChooser.DIRECTORIES_ONLY);
      fileChooser.setAcceptAllFileFilterUsed(false);
      int choice = fileChooser.showOpenDialog(installer);
      String selectedInstallationRootDir = fileChooser.getSelectedFile().
        getPath();
      if (choice == JFileChooser.APPROVE_OPTION) {
        c.setInstallationRootDirectory(
          Path.makeOsAgnostic(selectedInstallationRootDir));
        pathTextField.setText(Path.makeOsSpecific(c.getInstallationDirectory()));
      }
    }
  });
}
share|improve this question
    
Separating paths with / works surprisingly well on Windows. Aside from that, why do you need the Agnostic versions at all? –  Mat May 31 '12 at 20:10
    
@Mat, I know that. Here are some cases: 1. File#getAbsolutePath returns a string with OS-specific separator. 2. System.getProperty(<something that returns a path>) returns a string with OS-specific separator. 3. I need to read from and write to text-boxes in some installation panels, and when being rendered to the user, the paths need to be in OS-specific formats. –  missingfaktor May 31 '12 at 20:15
2  
Sure. So what are the *Agnostic things used for? –  Mat May 31 '12 at 20:16
    
@Mat, let me add a code example in my question. –  missingfaktor May 31 '12 at 20:20
    
Is displaying the same separator is a requirement? (e.g. using `` for all OSs). If not, just have a small utility to determine the not-supported separator, and replace it just before writing to the FS. that way you're not forcing the user to do anything "OS specific" –  Asaf May 31 '12 at 20:49
show 17 more comments

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Or you could introduce 2 new classes:

class OsSpecificPath implements FilePathInterface
{
      String path;

      OsAgnosticPath toAgnosticPath();

      OsSpecificPath concat( OsSpecificPath otherPath );

      // from IFilePath
      getFile();

     ... etc
}

and

class OsAgnosticPath implements FilePathInterface
{
      String path;

      OsSpecificPath toOsSpecificPath();

      OsAgnosticPath concat( OsAgnosticPath otherPath );

      // from IFilePath
      getFile();

     ... etc
}

each wrap a path however they need to.

each method could then have methods to convert to the other type of path, but instead of a "stringly-typed" solution where everything is a string and can be misused, you'd have 2 strongly typed classes that can't be incorrectly passed around.

Anything that doesn't care about the type of path would use FilePathInterface, anything that needs to operate on specific kinds of paths would use those types specificly. FilePathInterface could hypothetically have both toAgnosticPath and toOsSpecificPath in the interface if really necessary...

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for being less error-prone. However the conversions are still manual and code would be just as littered. –  missingfaktor May 31 '12 at 20:44
    
they might not need to be manual, though. Both classes could implement a single interface, like IFilePath or something, and then each class knows how to create File objects based on its own path style. you'd then just pass around IFilePath objects everywhere, and hide all of those conversions inside the classes themselves. Yes, at some point, like displaying them in text boxes, you're probably going to need to do some manual conversion, but everywhere else you shouldn't... –  John Gardner May 31 '12 at 20:49
    
Yes, that makes sense. Thanks! –  missingfaktor May 31 '12 at 20:57
    
Marked your answer as correct. A sidenote: This is a Java question, so please follow the Java conventions for method and type names. (Method names should be in lower camelcase, and Java interfaces do not follow the I- convention.) –  missingfaktor Jun 2 '12 at 7:32
    
I want to thank you again for this answer. I reworked my API following the idea you suggested, and I found out a couple of bugs in my code that I might have missed otherwise. –  missingfaktor Jun 2 '12 at 15:14
show 1 more comment

Not sure if this is what you're going for, but usually when I need to do something path-related in an OS-independent Java program, I always use Strings to pass paths around instead of Files, and I always do the following two things:

Whenever I am building a String path, I always use / as the file separator

Whenever I use a String path to create a File or save it as text somewhere, I always make the following calls prior to using the path:

String fSep = System.getProperty("file.separator);
String path = ... //might be built from scratch, might be passed in from somewhere
path = path.replace("/",fSep).replace("\\",fSep);

This seems to work well regardless of whether the path gets built on the local machine or if it gets passed in from a different machine on the network with a different OS, provided that I intend to use the path on the local machine. If you plan to pass the path between different OS'es via networking, just be careful that your own code is consistent.

EDIT

Wow... somehow my answer got mangled up and the code formatting didn't work as initially intended...

share|improve this answer
    
I also replace, just before writing to the file system. –  Asaf May 31 '12 at 20:45
add comment

You never need to convert back to os-agnostic. here are the conversions to os-specific:

public class Path {
  private Path() {
  }

  public static String concat(String path, String element) {
    return new File(path, element).getPath();
  }

  public static String makeOsSpecific(String path) {
    return new File(path).getAbsolutePath();
  }

  public static String fileName(String path) {
    return new File(path).getName();
  }
}

Your sample:

@Override
protected void initializeComponents() {
  super.initializeComponents();
  choosePathLabel = new JLabel("Please select the installation path:");
  final ApplicationContext c = installer.getAppContext();
  pathTextField = new JTextField(
    Path.makeOsSpecific(c.getInstallationDirectory()));
  browseButton = new JButton("Browse", 
    new ImageIcon("resources/images/browse.png"));
  browseButton.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
    @Override
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
      JFileChooser fileChooser = new JFileChooser();
      fileChooser.setFileSelectionMode(JFileChooser.DIRECTORIES_ONLY);
      fileChooser.setAcceptAllFileFilterUsed(false);
      int choice = fileChooser.showOpenDialog(installer);
      String selectedInstallationRootDir = fileChooser.getSelectedFile().
        getPath();
      if (choice == JFileChooser.APPROVE_OPTION) {
        c.setInstallationRootDirectory(selectedInstallationRootDir);
        pathTextField.setText(Path.makeOsSpecific(c.getInstallationDirectory()));
      }
    }
  });
}
share|improve this answer
    
There is an error in your example. File#getPath method returns OS-specific path string, whereas I need to store paths in OS-agnostic form in ApplicationContext. So c.setInstallationDirectory(selectedInstallationRootDir) is wrong. –  missingfaktor Jun 1 '12 at 5:19
    
@missingfaktor - why do you need to store them in os-agnostic format? that is the question i keep asking and you have not yet answered. –  jtahlborn Jun 1 '12 at 11:57
    
I have already answered it in one of the comments in this thread. Anyway here here we go again: Installer objects are created using this API I am designing. These objects need to specify several paths during their installation, and the paths are stored as strings. The Installer object will be written only once and will need to be functional regardless of OS. Now if I store these paths in formats specific to some OS, that would create a problem, wouldn't it? –  missingfaktor Jun 1 '12 at 12:08
    
@missingfaktor - my understanding of the ui code that you included is that is part of the installer shown to the user when running your installer, is that not correct? in which case, you would never need the os-agnostic paths, only the os-specific ones for the current os. what am i missing? –  jtahlborn Jun 1 '12 at 13:45
1  
@missingfaktor - the problem with explanations is that you have a lot of context which makes the small bit of information you have given make sense to you. unfortunately, this small window of info doesn't make sense to outsiders. many times people try to solve the wrong problem. i think that is the case here, unfortunately, i can't seem to find the root problem, so i can't help you solve it. the root problem is "why do you need os-agnostic paths" (other than the initial state of the installer). once you start the installation process, you should only need os-specific paths. –  jtahlborn Jun 1 '12 at 14:25
show 1 more comment

I would make my own MyFile object that extends or wraps java.util.File. Then make sure all your code uses this object instead of java.io.File. In here you would be doing the OS checks and calling methods to clean up the file name. The rest of your code would be 'clean'.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm assuming he means java.io.File. –  Charles May 31 '12 at 20:50
    
Yeah. Fixed it. –  Sarel Botha Jun 1 '12 at 11:44
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