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I have been researching a way to protect Python's source code, and the best way I found is to put code behind a webserver. So, the users "cannot" see the code, only run it through the web interface.

My thought is: put the script code on a directory that is not on the "www root" directory, then make a call from the web interface to web server execute the script on its original place. After that, it will show the output on the screen. So, the real code will be protected from been seen by the external users.

Is this a secure solution? Anybody here knows a couple of settings that we have to do on a Apache2 Server to protect the files, and make them transparent like this way?

Tks a lot !

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Voting to migrate - this isn't "programming" necessarily, more administrative deployment, which I think fits better on SuperUser. –  g.d.d.c May 31 '12 at 21:15
    
have you checked py2exe (or py2app or...) it compiles your scripts to standalone application. I am no sure if you can hide the scripts, though. It might be that the script is still easily extractable. Anyway, compiling to exe and bytecode is more than enough to keep regular users from seeing your code. –  Juha Jun 1 '12 at 13:59
    
Hi there. Yes, i made it. But i've discovered that is more easy then i thought to decompile the code. So, no way to make a "real hidding" using this method. –  StarkBR Jun 1 '12 at 14:01
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closed as off topic by g.d.d.c, 9000, mata, bernie, Graviton Jun 5 '12 at 0:37

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