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I'm looking for advice on Perl best practices. I wrote a script which had a complicated regular expression:

my $regex = qr/complicated/;

# ...

sub foo {
  # ...

  if (/$regex/)
  # ...
}

where foo is a function which is called often, and $regex is not used outside that function. What is the best way to handle situations like this? I only want it to be interpreted once, since it's long and complicated. But it seems a bit questionable to have it in global scope since it's only used in that sub. Is there a reasonable way to declare it static?

A similar issue arises with another possibly-unjustified global. It reads in the current date and time and formats it appropriately. This is also used many times, and again only in one function. But in this case it's even more important that it not be re-initialized, since I want all instances of the date-time to be the same from a given invocation of the script, even if the minutes roll over during execution.

At the moment I have something like

my ($regex, $DT);

sub driver {
  $regex = qr/complicated/;
  $DT = dateTime();
  # ...
}

# ...

driver();

which at least slightly segregates it. But perhaps there are better ways.

Again: I'm looking for the right way to do this, in terms of following best practices and Perl idioms. Performance is nice but readability and other needs take priority if I can't have everything.

share|improve this question
1  
Ack! Please say my ($regex, $DT) not my $regex, $DT! (use warnings will catch this. use strict will catch this more harshly) – mob May 31 '12 at 21:47
    
For regexes in particular, see ikegami's answer; for all other cases, see hobbs's. – Ether May 31 '12 at 22:51
    
@mob: Good catch. My actual code had it right, but the summary I typed was incorrect. – Charles Jun 1 '12 at 3:06
up vote 19 down vote accepted

If you're using perl 5.10+, use a state variable.

use feature 'state';
# use 5.012; also works, but not use 5.010;

sub womble {
    state $foo = something_expensive();
    return $foo ** 2;
}

will only call something_expensive once.

If you need to work with older perls, then use a lexical variable in an outer scope with an extra pair of braces:

{
    my $foo = something_expensive();
    sub womble {
        return $foo ** 2;
    }
}

this keeps $foo from leaking to anyone except for womble.

share|improve this answer
2  
state was introduced in 5.10, not 5.12. (Dev release 5.9.4, actually.) – cjm May 31 '12 at 21:53
1  
The trick with the lexical-scoped variable will only work if the variable assignment is executed. If you typically put your subroutines down the bottom of your main file then the assignment will only be executed when the program flow reaches it. – Adrian Pronk Dec 18 '12 at 2:59

There's a state keyword that might be a good fit for this situation:

sub foo {
    state $regex = /.../;
    ...
}
share|improve this answer

Is there any interpolation in the pattern? If not, the pattern will only be compiled once no matter how many times the qr// is executed.

$ perl -Mre=debug -e'qr/foo/ for 1..10' 2>&1 | grep Compiling | wc -l
1

$ perl -Mre=debug -e'qr/foo$_/ for 1..10' 2>&1 | grep Compiling | wc -l
10

Even if there is interpolation, the pattern will only be compiled if the interpolated variables have changed.

$ perl -Mre=debug -e'$x=123; qr/foo$x/ for 1..10;' 2>&1 | grep Compiling | wc -l
1

$ perl -Mre=debug -e'qr/foo$_/ for 1..10' 2>&1 | grep Compiling | wc -l
10

Otherwise, you can use

{
   my $re = qr/.../;
   sub foo {
      ...
      /$re/
      ...
   }
}

or

use feature qw( state );
sub foo {
   state $re = qr/.../;
   ...
   /$re/
   ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a good answer that answers the true spirit of the user's problem (only compiling a complicated regex once). Using a state variable is a good general solution, but for regexes should not be needed. – Ether May 31 '12 at 22:51

Regexes can be specified with the "o" modifier, which says "compile pattern once only" - in the 3rd. edition of the Camel, see p. 147

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I would like to complete ikegami's great answer. Some more words I would like to waste on the definition of local variables in pre 5.10 .

Let's see a simple example code:

#!/bin/env perl 

use strict;
use warnings;

{ # local 
my $local = "After Crying";
sub show { print $local,"\n"; }
} # local

sub show2;

show;
show2;

exit;

{ # local 
my $local = "Solaris";
sub show2 { print $local,"\n"; }
} # local

The user would expect that both sub will print the local variable, but this is not true!

Output:

After Crying
Use of uninitialized value $local in print at ./x.pl line 20.

The reason is that show2 is parsed, but the initialization of the local variable is not executed! (Of course if exit is removed and a show2 is added at the end, Solaris will be printed in the thirds line)

This can be fixed easily:

{ # local 
my $local;
BEGIN { $local = "Solaris"; }
sub show2 { print $local,"\n"; }
} # local

And now the output what was expected:

After Crying
Solaris

But state in 5.10+ is a better choice...

I hope this helps!

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