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I've got a Rails 3 app that I'm working on. I'm using the composite_primary_keys gem for a few tables, but Rails is still creating an id field that's not being used (i.e. it's nil for each entry). While it runs on my local machine in SQLite3, I can't run the app on Heroku. Postgresql throws a fit at me and gives me this error:

2012-05-31T21:12:36+00:00 app[web.1]: ActiveRecord::StatementInvalid (PG::Error: ERROR:  null value in column "id" violates not-null constraint
2012-05-31T21:12:36+00:00 app[web.1]:   app/controllers/items_controller.rb:57:in `block (2 levels) in create'
2012-05-31T21:12:36+00:00 app[web.1]: : INSERT INTO "item_attr_quants" ("attribute_id", "created_at", "id", "item_id", "updated_at", "value") VALUES ($1, $2, $3, $4, $5, $6) RETURNING "item_id","attribute_id"):

Since the "id" field is nil, Postgresql's yelling at me.

Is there a way I can prevent the "id" field from being created in the first place, delete the column using a raw SQL statement, force Postgresql on Heroku to allow the "id" field to be null, or get around this some other way? I'm dead-set on using composite primary keys, so I don't want to delete the gem and rewrite code.

Model

class ItemAttrQuant < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :item
  belongs_to :attribute
  self.primary_keys = :item_id, :attribute_id
end

Migration

class CreateItemAttrQuants < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :item_attr_quants do |t|
      t.belongs_to :item
      t.belongs_to :attribute
      t.integer :value

      t.timestamps
    end
    add_index :item_attr_quants, :item_id
    add_index :item_attr_quants, :attribute_id
  end
end
share|improve this question
1  
My answer got deleted because it did not answer the question, which it admittedly did not. However it is an extremely bad idea to develop against one database and deploy to another. It would be like developing with ruby 1.8.6 and deploy to 1.9.3. Sure the interface is mostly the same, but it is not the same. This problem is first problem of many you will have if you continue down this path. –  Will Jun 1 '12 at 0:03
    
Will, thanks for the helpful advice on development in general. I kinda botched that, but I suppose it's part of the learning curve as a new developer. –  Max Scheiber Jun 2 '12 at 18:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the :id => false and :primary_key options to create_table in your migration:

class CreateItemAttrQuants < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :item_attr_quants, :id => false do |t|
      ...
    end
    ...
  end
end

That will create item_attr_quants without the id column but your table won't have a real primary key. You could add fake one by specifying not null for item_id and attribute_id and adding a unique index on those two columns:

class CreateItemAttrQuants < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :item_attr_quants, :id => false do |t|
      t.integer :item_id, :null => false
      t.integer :attribute_id, :null => false
      t.integer :value
      t.timestamps
    end
    add_index :item_attr_quants, [:item_id, :attribute_id], :unique => true
    add_index :item_attr_quants, :item_id
    add_index :item_attr_quants, :attribute_id
  end
end

I don't think ActiveRecord fully understands the notion of a real composite primary key inside the database so a unique index is AFAIK the best you can do unless you want to manually send an ALTER TABLE into the database.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the thorough response! It worked perfectly. I hadn't considered that it was possible to simply not create an id field in a Rails database. –  Max Scheiber Jun 2 '12 at 19:01

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