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I'm really new to C(I have been learning Cuda and wanted to learn C so I can run everything together instead of generating data in Java/Python and copy/pasting it manually to my Cuda program to play with). I am trying to open a large file(20+gb) and parse some data but because I was having problems I decided to try to break down my problem first to verify I can open and read line by line a file and then in another file take a sample of the output of a line and try to parse it, then if all goes well I can simply bring them together. I managed(after a bit of a struggle) to get each part working but when I combine them together it doesn't work(I tried in both eclipse & QT creator. QT creator says it exited unexpectedly and eclipse just stops..).

Here's the parsing part(it works exactly as I want):

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    char line[1024] = "[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 4],";
    size_t len = strlen(line);
    memmove(line, line+1, len-3);
    line[len-3] = 0;
    printf("%s \n",line);


    char str[100], *s = str, *t = NULL;

    strcpy(str, line);
    while ((t = strtok(s, " ,")) != NULL) {
        s = NULL;
        printf(":%s:\n", t);
    }
    return 0;
}

The data in variable line is exactly as I get if I print each line of a file. But when I copy/paste it into my main program then it doesn't work(QT shows nothing and eclipse just shows the first line). This code is just a few file IO commands that are wrapped around the commands above(everything within the while loop is the exact same as above)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main() {

    char line[1024];
    FILE *fp = fopen("/Users/me/Desktop/output.txt","r");

    printf("Starting.. \n");

    int count = 0;
    int list[30]; //items will be stored here

    while(fgets(line, 1024, fp) != NULL){
        count++;
        //char line[1024] = "[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 4],";
        size_t len = strlen(line);
        memmove(line, line+1, len-4);
        line[len-4] = 0;
        printf("%s \n",line);

        char *s = str, *t = NULL;

        strcpy(str, line);
        while ((t = strtok(s, " ,")) != NULL) {
            s = NULL;
            printf(":%s:\n", t);
        }
    }
    printf(" num of lines is %i \n", count);
    return 0;
}

eclipse output:

Starting.. 
0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 4 

I can't figure out what I'm doing wrong. I'm using a mac with gcc 4.2, if that helps. The only thing I can think of is maybe I'm doing something wrong the way I parse the list variable so its not accessible later on(I'm not sure its a wild guess). Is there anything I'm missing?

EDIT: if I comment out this block of code, it goes through the file(but doesn't parse):

while ((t = strtok(s, " ,")) != NULL) {
    s = NULL;
    printf(":%s:\n", t);
}

the contents of the file is basically:

[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 4],
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 2, 2, 2, 4],
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 4, 2, 2, 2, 2, 4],

and so on(20+gb of that).

EDIT2: I just wanted to test if it was with my mac or not and I tried it on centos 5(installed it just to test) and I got the same error when running from command line except at the end it said Segmentation fault. All I did was copy the sample output above into a file, and changed the path in my code above and ran it.

share|improve this question
    
your memmove thing doesn't seem to do anything reasonable, why don't you define line directly with the contents that you want? –  Jens Gustedt May 31 '12 at 22:12
    
@JensGustedt I'm not sure what you mean, but I'm not generating the file itself. So I need to parse the variable line to get it into a format that is useful for me. –  Error_404 May 31 '12 at 22:15
    
line is copied into str, but line could be greater than 1024 characters. Why not just point s at line instead of performing the copy? –  hmjd May 31 '12 at 22:37
    
@hmjd I changed the line that declared str and pointed s to this: char *s = line, *t = NULL; but the result is still the same. –  Error_404 May 31 '12 at 22:49
    
I think I figured it out. (See my updated answer.) –  Matt May 31 '12 at 23:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I got it! Try inserting #include <string.h> with the other includes. I don't know why you were using functions <string.h> it without including it but it caused incorrect linkage. The compiler issued the following warnings:

test2.c:17: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘strlen’
test2.c:18: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘memmove’
test2.c:24: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘strcpy’
test2.c:25: warning: assignment makes pointer from integer without a cast

The first three warnings indicate that you did not include the header file. The last one just goes to show that without declarations, functions are assumed to take and return integers (this is for backwards compatibility with ancient C code).

Don't forget that fgets includes the newline character at the end of the line. You need to account for that by changing len-3 to len-4.

Also, don't forget to fclose the file when you are done with it.

Also, your memmove is unnecessary as you can just point to the second character:

char *moved_line = line + 1;
share|improve this answer
    
in my code I do that..I thought it was because my file added a newline, but interesting to know that its related to fgets –  Error_404 May 31 '12 at 22:46
    
@Error_404 fgets gets a line of the file at a time, since lines end in a newline, it includes the newline. –  Matt May 31 '12 at 22:51
    
ahhh your a genius! thank you so much, but I'll bug you with another question then..how can I prevent stupid mistakes like this again(other than me getting a brain transplant)? I don't mean to complain but I find c not very verbose when I do stupid stuff unlike Java/python(which assume correctly I'm making mistakes). –  Error_404 May 31 '12 at 23:37
    
@Error_404 Don't ignore compiler warnings even if they are not errors. –  Matt May 31 '12 at 23:40
    
ahh ok, on the command line I see warnings but in both programs I don't see the build messages because they just happen in the background. I'll bring it to the foreground now..Thanks so much Matt. I have spent most of the day trying to figure this out(& a lot longer if you didn't point that mistake out..thank you so much!). –  Error_404 May 31 '12 at 23:43

You have two declarations of line here - one just after main(), and one just after while. fgets reads into the first line variable. Within the while block, the second line declaration masks the first (because the second is more local). The outer line variable - the one that fgets reads into - is not accessed anywhere else in the program.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry, I commented it out and reran it and still got the same output. –  Error_404 May 31 '12 at 22:13

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