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Consider a dictionary with keys created using objects of the class below:

class Point( object ):

    def __init__( self, x, y ):
        self.x = x
        self.y = y

    def __eq__( self, other ):
        return self.x == other.x

    def __hash__( self ):
        return self.x.__hash__()

    def __ne__( self, other ):
        return self.x != other.x

>>> a = Point(1,1)
>>> b = Point(0, 2)
>>> dct = {}
>>> dct[a] = 15
>>> dct[b] = 16
>>> dct[a]
15
>>> c = Point(1,None)
>>> dct[c]
15

This happens because c and a share the same hash and are equal. Is there an O(1) way to implement a function that given c returns a (as against the O(n) implementation below?):

def getKey( dct, key ):
    for k in dct:
        if k == key:
            return k
    return None
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2  
You've defined your Point objects to be equal if and only if their x values are equal. Is there some reason you don't want the y value to figure into things? –  John Y May 31 '12 at 22:34
2  
What you are looking for does not exist, but you could create it by subclassing dict and maintaining an internal dictionary that maps keys to themselves. This would add some overhead to every modification to the dictionary, but you could get the actual key object in O(1) through the internal dictionary. –  Andrew Clark May 31 '12 at 23:05
    
I was hoping I could do this in a neat pythonic way. Thanks F.J. for pointing out there is no trivial way to do this. –  GeneralBecos Jun 1 '12 at 16:05
    
@JohnY: I used Point just as a general (maybe a bad) example for the general idea for querying a dictionary key. –  GeneralBecos Jun 1 '12 at 16:17

4 Answers 4

You can probably make the values for the dictionary as tuples or lists consisting of the key and the value itself. using your example:

>>> a = Point(1,1)
>>> b = Point(0, 2)
>>> dct = {}
>>> dct[a] = (15, a)
>>> dct[b] = (16, b)
>>> dct[a] 
(15, <Point object at 0xb769dc2c>)
>>> c = Point(1,None)
>>> dct[c]
(15, <Point object at 0xb769dc2c>)

now you can get a using c like this:

>>> dct[c][1]
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This happens because c and a share the same hash.

No; it happens because they share a hash and compare equal to each other.

In general, unequal objects may hash to the same value. (Equal objects must hash to the same value.)

Your __eq__ defines the objects as being equal if they have the same x coordinate. This is clearly wrong; they should only be equal if both coordinates are equal.

But it sounds like that's not what you're really trying to do. If you want to "given c, get a", then what you are really asking is to find, given a point, all other points with the same x-coordinate.

That is simple: make a dict mapping x-coordinate-values to points-with-that-coordinate.

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I'm more interested in the general concept. Not particularly related to Point. I just used Point as an example. Thanks for pointing out the error in my problem statement. Fixing it. –  GeneralBecos Jun 1 '12 at 16:02

In other words, given a list of objects and an object X, find an element in the list that has the same hash value as X. Consider:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self, x, blah):
        self.x = x
        self.blah = blah
    def __eq__(self, other):
        return self.x == other.x
    def __hash__(self):
        return self.x
    def __repr__(self):
        return '%d-%s' % (self.x, self.blah)


ls = [A(1, 'one'), A(2, 'FOO'), A(3, 'three')]
test = A(2, 'BAR')
print test, '=', (set(ls) - (set(ls) - set([test]))).pop()

To work with your dictionary example, replace set(ls) with viewkeys:

dct = dict(zip(ls, range(100)))
print test, '=', (dct.viewkeys() - (dct.viewkeys() - set([test]))).pop()
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This is O(n) just like the version in the question. He wanted a constant time solution, like the ones F.J, Karl, and Amr suggest. –  agf May 31 '12 at 23:15
    
To add a bit more color: Creating the sets themselves will be linear time + subtraction will be linear making this worse than the solution described in the problem statement. –  GeneralBecos Jun 1 '12 at 16:34
    
@GeneralBecos: you're welcome ;) –  georg Jun 1 '12 at 16:52

Your function always returns None or key, so I don't get your point...

According to complexity, suppose you will need at least O(log(n)), for example, if dct is as I suppose dictionary, so what about:

def getKey( dct, key ):
    if dct.has_key(key):
        return key
    return None

and if you want to return it's value, so just use: dct.get(key, None)

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3  
This isn't the same thing, getKey(dct, c) would return a in the OP's code, and c in your code. –  Andrew Clark May 31 '12 at 22:48
    
Indeed - I forgot about redefined __eq__ function. So what about added new dictionary: keyMap[x] = KeyPoint (where KeyPoint is a Point(x, y) that is a key in dict –  ddzialak Jun 1 '12 at 8:24
    
@ddzialak: Downvoted the answer (It does not answer the question). –  GeneralBecos Jun 1 '12 at 16:24

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