Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Very new to C so please bear with me! I'm trying to read 3 arguments separated by spaces from "instruction" into the 3 strings using sscanf. I've got the following code so far:

char * buffer;
buffer = (char*) malloc (5000);
sscanf(instruction, "%s %s %s", &opcode, &arg1, &arg2, buffer);

However whilst it compiles fine, there is a seg fault on the last line where the sscanf is. Last time I saw this error it was because there wasn't enough memory in the variables to store the information. I'm guessing I'm not using malloc properly?

I can't post the entire code unfortunately as it doesn't belong to me.

share|improve this question
    
What's the types of opcode, arg1 and arg2? I guess the problem is there. –  mity May 31 '12 at 22:38
    
They are char * 's. –  James Hadley May 31 '12 at 22:39
5  
Then remove the ampersands. The three %s escapes will then fill them (assuming you have them pointing to valid memory and the buffers are large enough). Note the buffer will be never filled as your format strings refers only to three args. –  mity May 31 '12 at 22:42
1  
@mity, post that as answer. –  hmjd May 31 '12 at 22:43
    
Thanks - just done that. It's still seg faulting on that line though - do I need to allocate memory to one of the variables? –  James Hadley May 31 '12 at 22:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are using sscanf improperly. Try this:

#define BUFFER_SIZE 1024 /* generally good practice to use constants */

char *opcode = (char *)malloc(BUFFER_SIZE);
char *arg1 = (char *)malloc(BUFFER_SIZE);
char *arg2 = (char *)malloc(BUFFER_SIZE);
sscanf(instruction, "%s %s %s", opcode, arg1, arg2);

Depending on how you use these variables, it might be better to allocate them on the stack:

char opcode[BUFFER_SIZE];
char arg1[BUFFER_SIZE];
char arg2[BUFFER_SIZE];
sscanf(instruction, "%s %s %s", opcode, arg1, arg2);
share|improve this answer
    
That did it, thank you very much. Will tick the answer in 3 minutes. –  James Hadley May 31 '12 at 22:47
2  
@JamesHadley: Don't forget to call free() to free the memory allocated by malloc() :) –  LihO May 31 '12 at 22:53

Remove the ampersands. The three %s escapes will then fill them (assuming you have them pointing to valid memory and the buffers are large enough). Note the buffer will be never filled as your format strings refers only to three args

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.