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I'm trying to implement a history feature for a simple shell. The history should hold the last 10 commands executed. I placed my code below, but I am running into some problems.

First, when I enter one (or two) commands and type in historyto display the history, nothing is displayed. But, when I enter a few more commands, the entire history is displayed (like it should), but a string of zero's is displayed next to each history index.

What am I doing wrong, and how can I fix this?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#define MAX_LINE 80 /* 80 chars per line, per command, should be enough. */

char *history[10][MAX_LINE];
int placePointer;


/**
 * setup() reads in the next command line, separating it into distinct tokens
 * using whitespace as delimiters. setup() sets the args parameter as a 
 * null-terminated string.
 */

void setup(char inputBuffer[], char *args[],int *background)
{
    int length, /* # of characters in the command line */
        i,      /* loop index for accessing inputBuffer array */
        start,  /* index where beginning of next command parameter is */
        ct;     /* index of where to place the next parameter into args[] */

    ct = 0;

    /* read what the user enters on the command line */
    length = read(STDIN_FILENO, inputBuffer, MAX_LINE);  

    start = -1;
    if (length == 0)
        exit(0);            /* ^d was entered, end of user command stream */
    if (length < 0){
        perror("error reading the command");
        exit(-1);           /* terminate with error code of -1 */
    }

    /* examine every character in the inputBuffer */
    for (i = 0; i < length; i++) { 
        switch (inputBuffer[i]){
        case ' ':
        case '\t' :               /* argument separators */
            if(start != -1){
                args[ct] = &inputBuffer[start];    /* set up pointer */
                ct++;
            }
            inputBuffer[i] = '\0'; /* add a null char; make a C string */
            start = -1;
            break;

        case '\n':                 /* should be the final char examined */
            if (start != -1){
                args[ct] = &inputBuffer[start];     
                ct++;
            }
            inputBuffer[i] = '\0';
            args[ct] = NULL; /* no more arguments to this command */
            break;

        case '&':
            *background = 1;
            inputBuffer[i] = '\0';
            break;

        default :             /* some other character */
            if (start == -1)
                start = i;
        } 
    }    
    args[ct] = NULL; /* just in case the input line was > 80 */
} 

void displayHistory(){
    printf("Display History:\n");
    int i = placePointer;
    int j;
    int counter;
    while(counter < 10) {
        printf("%d: ",counter);
        for (j = 0; j < MAX_LINE; j++) {
          printf("%d",history[i][j]);
        }
        printf("\n");
        i = (i + 1) % 10;
        counter++;
    }
}
/*
void runHistoryAt(int index){
    printf("Run History At:\n");
    char *arg1 = &history[placePointer + index][0];
    char *argLine[MAX_LINE/2+1];
    int j;
    for (j = 0; j < MAX_LINE/2+1; j++) {
      *argLine[j] = history[placePointer + index][j];
    }
    execvp(arg1,argLine);
}*/

int main(void)
{
    char inputBuffer[MAX_LINE]; /* buffer to hold the command entered */
    int background;             /* equals 1 if a command is followed by '&' */
    char *args[MAX_LINE/2+1];/* command line (of 80) has max of 40 arguments */


    while (1){            /* Program terminates normally inside setup */
        background = 0;
        printf("COMMAND->");
            fflush(0);
            setup(inputBuffer, args, &background);       /* get next command */

        /* the steps are:
         (1) fork a child process using fork()
         (2) the child process will invoke execvp()
         (3) if background == 0, the parent will wait, 
            otherwise returns to the setup() function. */

        pid_t pid = fork();
        printf("Fork created.\n");


        if(pid < 0){
            printf("Fork failed.\n");
        }else if(pid == 0){
            if( strcmp(args[0],"history") == 0){ /*  Print History */
                displayHistory();
            }else if(strcmp(args[0],"r") == 0){ /*  r num */
                int index = (int) args[1];
                /*runHistoryAt( index - 1);*/
            }else if(strcmp(args[0],"rr") == 0){ /*  Run recent */
                /*runHistoryAt(0);*/
            }else{  /*  Execute normally */
                printf("executing..., adding to history buffer\n");
                /* Add args to history buffer */
                int j;
                for (j = 0; j < sizeof(args); j++) {
                    history[placePointer][j] = args[j];
                }
                placePointer = (placePointer + 1) % 10;
                /* Execute!  */
                execvp(args[0],args);
            }
        }

        if(background == 0){
            wait(NULL);
        }else{
          setup(inputBuffer, args, &background);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Oliver Charlesworth, Tim Post Jun 4 '12 at 7:30

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Seriously, you are best placed to debug this yourself. Asking strangers to spot the errors in your code by inspection is not productive. – Oliver Charlesworth May 31 '12 at 23:42

All of your args pointers are pointers into your inputBuffer, which contains the most recent line of input entered. So when you save the args to the history you're just saving pointers, not the actual pointed at strings, which are still (only) in the inputBuffer. When you read the next command, it overwrites the inputBuffer making all your saved history pointers invalid -- they now point at some piece of the current command and not at the old command.

share|improve this answer
    
So, would a way to fix this be that I should save the values in history, rather than pointers? And how would I do that? – user906153 Jun 1 '12 at 0:45
    
@user906153, hey do you by any chance have the working code for this or figure out and remember why your code did not work? – wolfclique Sep 21 '15 at 4:40

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