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I've encountered a problem with my class file and I can't seem to find a fix around it. I was hoping someone could point me to the right direction.

Here's my code:

class Car:
    def __init__(self, year_model, make, speed):
        self.__year_model = year_model
        self.__make = make
        self.__speed = 0

    def set_year_model(self, year_model):
        self.__year_model = year_model

    def set_make(self, make):
        self.__make = make

    def get_year_model(self):
        return self.__year_model

    def get_make(self):
        return self.__make

    def accelerate(self):
        self.__speed + 5
        return self.__speed

    def decelerate(self):
        self.__speed - 5
        return self.__speed

    def get_speed(self):
        return self.__speed 

Essentially, I want the speed attribute set to 0, and have 3 methods (accelerate, decelerate, and get_speed) which add and subtract 5 to the speed attribute and eventually return the speed attribute so it can be printed.

I would guess there's a problem with my formatting but I can't seem to find the correct arrangement that would fix the class.

The real program is suppose to loop the accelerate method 5 times, but the class method is supposed to handle the sequential addition and return the final speed.

import car

user_year = 1995
user_make = "toyota"
user_speed = 0

user_car = car.Car(user_year, user_make, user_speed)

for count in range(1,6):
user_car.accelerate()

print user_car.get_speed()

I know this code is very weak, but it's all makeshift to help make my problem clearer. So hopefully it's not too confusing and I can get an answer.

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1  
Your problem is also because you're writing Java in Python syntax... –  JBernardo Jun 1 '12 at 0:22
    
To elaborate on Jbernardo's statement, see this article. Don't write getters and setters unless you NEED them, and then use a property. See also: Python is not Java. –  Darthfett Jun 1 '12 at 0:48
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

self._speed + 5 computes the current speed plus 5. But you're not actually storing the computed value anywhere. You want to use self._speed = self._speed + 5, or the more commonly used form, self._speed += 5.

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embarassing...I quit. –  Jertise Jun 1 '12 at 0:02
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The problem is, of course, the "+=" and "-=" portions that are missing, but I'd go a step further and suggest that if you're writing new python code, you become familiar with new style classes. In a new style class, your code could be written as follows:

class Car(object):
    def __init__(self, year_model, make, speed):
        self.year_model = year_model
        self.make = make
        self.speed = 0

    def __set_year_model(self, year_model):
        self.__year_model = year_model

    def __set_make(self, make):
        self.__make = make

    def __set_speed(self, speed):
        self.__speed = speed

    def __get_year_model(self):
        return self.__year_model

    def __get_make(self):
        return self.__make

    def accelerate(self):
        self.speed += 5

    def decelerate(self):
        self.speed -= 5

    def __get_speed(self):
        return self.__speed 

    speed = property(fget=__get_speed,fset=__set_speed,fdoc="Set or Retrieve the current speed of this instance of the Car object")
    make = property(fget=__get_make,fset=__set_make,fdoc="Set or Retrieve the make of this instance of the Car object")
    year_model = property(fget=__get_year_model,fset=__set_year_model,fdoc="Set or Retrieve the Year and Model of this instance of the Car object")

In addition, the code changes in the main file:

import car

user_year = 1995
user_make = "toyota"
user_speed = 0

user_car = car.Car(user_year, user_make, user_speed)

for count in range(1,6):
    user_car.accelerate()

print user_car.speed
share|improve this answer
1  
Better is to use the @property decorator. However, writing setters/getters is only good if you actually want to change how a property is accessed (Python properties preserve the object.attribute interface). In addition, if you are using python 3.x, classes will automatically inherit from object. –  Darthfett Jun 1 '12 at 0:34
    
While I generally agree with your comments, the poster appears to be writing code for a very old version of Python -- I was trying to use property explicitly and in a way that he/she would find readable without having to do too much reading about decorators. I probably should have written it out using decorators as well and included that explanation... Feel free to edit the answer and add it :). –  Keith Schoenefeld Jun 1 '12 at 0:39
    
I didn't notice that he used print as a statement. Other than this, I don't see anything that indicates his version of python is 'very old' (did I miss something?). It is typical for someone to come from a language like Java, and write setters/getters, which has no benefit in python, thus I wanted to bring to light the uselessness of properties in this example. –  Darthfett Jun 1 '12 at 0:46
    
The print statement combined with lack of new style objects led me to my (possibly inaccurate) conclusion. –  Keith Schoenefeld Jun 1 '12 at 0:48
    
AFAICT, decorators have been available since 2.4. Regardless, the correct thing to do when you don't yet have any get or set logic is to just use an attribute, and swap it for a property later when logic needs to be added. The entire point of properties is to make it so that the calling code doesn't change when you switch from an attribute to a property, and apply YAGNI. –  Karl Knechtel Jun 1 '12 at 2:00
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