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The following code compiles in Visual Studio 2010 but fails to compile in the Visual Studio 2012 RC.

#include <string>

// Windows stuffs
typedef __nullterminated const wchar_t *LPCWSTR;

class CTestObj {
public:
    CTestObj() {m_tmp = L"default";};

    operator LPCWSTR()  { return m_tmp.c_str(); }       // returns const wchar_t*
    operator std::wstring() const { return m_tmp; }     // returns std::wstring

protected:
    std::wstring m_tmp;
};


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    CTestObj x;
    std::wstring strval = (std::wstring) x;

    return 0;
}

The error returned is:

error C2440: 'type cast' : cannot convert from 'CTestObj' to 'std::wstring'
No constructor could take the source type, or constructor overload resolution was ambiguous

I've already realized that commenting out either of the conversion operators fixes the compile problem. I just want to understand:

  1. What's going on under the hood to cause this
  2. Why this compiles in VS2010 and not in VS2012? Is it because of a C++11 change?
share|improve this question
    
Uh, most likely it's a bug... –  ildjarn Jun 1 '12 at 0:12
    
That might be the case but my hunch is it is a breaking change that I just don't understand. –  jqcAngel Jun 1 '12 at 1:31
2  
Having operator LPCWSTR is probably a bad idea anyway. If you have a function CTestObj foo(), then the operator would silently allow LPCWSTR x = foo();, and you now have a pointer to freed memory. –  jamesdlin Jun 3 '12 at 3:23
1  
@MarkRansom: I wouldn't agree with "worked well". IMO it's a convention that's been problematic with CString (and _bstr_t) for many years. IMO the additional burden of explicitly invoking a c_str() method is very low, and the C++ standards committee did go the c_str route instead of the implicit cast route for a reason. (Although now with C++11, an explicit cast operator seems like a fine compromise.) –  jamesdlin Jun 3 '12 at 7:45
1  
You can simplify this repro a little by removing the assignment. just use "((std::wstring) x);". Cast it and throw away the result. There is ambiguity IF and Only if it were implied. Since you are EXPLICITLY casting, there should be no ambiguity. Please file a bug with MS: you can do this from the help menu in VS2012. –  Dan Jun 3 '12 at 20:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I'm understanding the logic under the hood, the operator overload is trying to copy the code and the object every time you cast. Therefore, you need to return it as a reference instead of attempting to return a new object based on the field. The line:

operator std::wstring() const { return m_tmp; }

should be:

operator std::wstring&() { return m_tmp; }

The following compiles and runs as expected.

#include <string>

// Windows stuffs
typedef __nullterminated const wchar_t *LPCWSTR;

class CTestObj {
public:
    CTestObj() {m_tmp = L"default";};

    operator LPCWSTR()  { return m_tmp.c_str(); }       // returns const wchar_t*
    operator std::wstring&() { return m_tmp; }     // returns std::wstring

protected:
    std::wstring m_tmp;
};


int main()
{
    CTestObj x;
    std::wstring strval = (std::wstring) x;
    wprintf(L"%s\n", strval.c_str());

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This should have been answered a long time ago. My sympathies for such a long wait-time! –  Qix Sep 2 '12 at 4:44
1  
And I'm sorry for taking so long to accept this answer! Thank you so much. –  jqcAngel Oct 4 '12 at 18:40
    
Not a problem :] –  Qix Oct 4 '12 at 18:51

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