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I'm trying to find a good way to cumulatively apply up to 5 Func's to the same IEnumerable. Here is what I came up with:

private Func<SurveyUserView,bool> _getFilterLambda(IDictionary<string, string> filters)
{
    Func<SurveyUserView, bool> invokeList = delegate(SurveyUserView surveyUserView)
    { 
        return surveyUserView.deleted != "deleted"; 
    };

    if (filters.ContainsKey("RegionFilter"))
    {
        invokeList += delegate(SurveyUserView surveyUserView)
        {
            return surveyUserView.Region == filters["RegionFilter"];
        };
    }

    if (filters.ContainsKey("LanguageFilter"))
    {
        invokeList += delegate(SurveyUserView surveyUserView)
        {
            return surveyUserView.Locale == filters["LanguageFilter"];
        };
    }

    if (filters.ContainsKey("StatusFilter"))
    {
        invokeList += delegate(SurveyUserView surveyUserView)
        { 
            return surveyUserView.Status == filters["StatusFilter"]; 
        };
    }

    if (filters.ContainsKey("DepartmentFilter"))
    {
        invokeList += delegate(SurveyUserView surveyUserView)
        {
            return surveyUserView.department == filters["DepartmentFilter"];
        };
    }

    return invokeList;
}

I thought that it would apply these in a cumulative fashion, however, I can see from the results that it's actually just applying the last one (DepartmentFilter).

There are 2^4 possible combinations so brute-force if/elses are not going to work. (I want to AND using a particular lambda only when the corresponding key is present in the Dictionary.)

EDIT: Here is the solution that I accepted, but it causes a StackOverflowException when it is evaluated. Anybody see why?

private Func<SurveyUserView,bool> _getFilterLambda(IDictionary<string, string> filters )
    {

        Func<SurveyUserView, bool> resultFilter = (suv) => suv.deleted != "deleted";                                                        

        if (filters.ContainsKey("RegionFilter"))
        {
            Func<SurveyUserView, bool> newFilter =
                (suv) => resultFilter(suv) && suv.Region == filters["RegionFilter"];
            resultFilter = newFilter;
        }

        if (filters.ContainsKey("LanguageFilter"))
        {
            Func<SurveyUserView, bool> newFilter =
                 (suv) => resultFilter(suv) && suv.Locale == filters["LanguageFilter"];
            resultFilter = newFilter;
        }

        if (filters.ContainsKey("StatusFilter"))
        {
            Func<SurveyUserView, bool> newFilter =
                (suv) => resultFilter(suv) && suv.Status == filters["StatusFilter"];
            resultFilter = newFilter;
        }

        if (filters.ContainsKey("DepartmentFilter"))
        {
            Func<SurveyUserView, bool> newFilter =
                (suv) => resultFilter(suv) && suv.department == filters["DepartmentFilter"];
            resultFilter = newFilter;
        }

        return resultFilter;
    }

EDIT: Here is the very nice explanation of why this resulted in a StackOverflowException from friend and mentor Chris Flather-

The important thing to understanding why the infinite recursion occurs is understanding when the symbols in a lambda are resolved (i.e. at runtime and not at definition).

Take this simplified example:

Func<int, int> demo = (x) => x * 2;
Func<int, int> demo2 = (y) => demo(y) + 1;
demo = demo2;
int count = demo(1);

If it were resolved statically at definition this would work and be the same as:

Func<int, int> demo2 = (y) => (y * 2) + 1;
Int count = demo2(1);

But it doesn’t actually attempt to figure out what the demo embedded in demo2 does until runtime – at which time demo2 has been redefined to demo. Essentially the code now reads:

Func<int, int> demo2 = (y) => demo2(y) + 1;
Int count = demo2(1);
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Instead of trying to combine the delegates this way, you could build new delegates that use the existing one with your AND condition:

Func<SurveyUserView, bool> resultFilter = (suv) => true;

if (filters.ContainsKey("RegionFilter"))
{
    var tmpFilter = resultFilter;
    // Create a new Func based on the old + new condition
    resultFilter = (suv) => tmpFilter(suv) && suv.Region == filters["RegionFilter"];
}

if (filters.ContainsKey("LanguageFilter"))
{
   // Same as above...

//... Continue, then:

return resultFilter;

That being said, it may be easier to pass your original IQueryable<SurveyUserView> or IEnumerable<SurveyUserView> into this method, and just add .Where clauses directly to filter. You could then return the final query without executing it, with the filters added on.

share|improve this answer
1  
WARNING! This caused a stack overflow exception when I implemented it. (Which is sort of ironic. :) ) Reed's solution makes good logical sense, but his comment at the bottom (chaining Where clauses) looks like the only way to go here. – Trey Carroll Jun 1 '12 at 2:54
    
@TreyCarroll Did you implement it the same way as above, using a temporary variable for the new lambda? – Reed Copsey Jun 1 '12 at 3:39
    
Yes. I followed your pattern exactly. Just reconfirmed that is is throwing SOE. – Trey Carroll Jun 1 '12 at 4:14
    
Clarification: It doesn't throw when the method called. I get back the Func<SurveyUserView,bool> just fine. It's when the resultant lambda is being actually used that it throws the exception. – Trey Carroll Jun 1 '12 at 4:24
1  
The stack overflow is because of late evaluation - initially, newFilter = (suv) => resultFilter(suv) && .... Unfortunately, the line resultFilter = newFilter means that you end up with newFilter = (suv) => newFilter(suv) && ...! Perhaps you need to build an expression tree instead, and thus avoid the closure problem. – Simon MᶜKenzie Jun 1 '12 at 4:51

I would think that using the Where(...) extension on what is, presumably, an IQueryable<SurveyUserView> and return a IQueryable<SurveyUserView> instead of a Func<...>:

// Assuming `q` is a `IQueryable<SurveyUserView>`

if(filters.ContainsKeys["Whatever"])
{
  q = q.Where(suv => suv.Status == filters["Whatever"];
}

The Anding is implicit.

share|improve this answer
    
What is the "And" extension? Did you mean .Where(...)? – Reed Copsey Jun 1 '12 at 2:23
    
I mistyped. I'll edit it. I was thinking Expression stuff, not plain IQueryables. – bluevector Jun 1 '12 at 2:26
    
+1 chain the Wheres - so easy. – Kirk Broadhurst Jun 1 '12 at 4:19
    private Func<SurveyUserView, bool> _getFilterLabda(IDictionary<string, string> filters)
    {
        Func<SurveyUserView, bool> invokeList = surveyUserView => surveyUserView.deleted != "deleted");

        if (filters.ContainsKey("RegionFilter"))
        {
            invokeList += surveyUserView => surveyUserView.Region == filters["RegionFilter"]);
        }

        if (filters.ContainsKey("LanguageFilter"))
        {
            invokeList += surveyUserView => surveyUserView.Locale == filters["LanguageFilter"];
        }

        if (filters.ContainsKey("StatusFilter"))
        {
            invokeList += surveyUserView => surveyUserView.Status == filters["StatusFilter"];
        }

        if (filters.ContainsKey("DepartmentFilter"))
        {
            invokeList += surveyUserView => surveyUserView.department == filters["DepartmentFilter"]);
        }

        return invokeList;
    }
    ...
    Func<SurveyUserView, bool> resultFilter = suv => _getFilterLabda(filters)
         .GetInvocationList()
         .Cast<Func<SurveyUserView, bool>>()
         .All(del => del(suv))
share|improve this answer
    
A single Func<string,bool> is sufficient, you don't need a list of multicast delegates. See the GetInvocationList() member. – Ben Voigt Jun 1 '12 at 3:49
    
@BenVoigt, if your purpose is to aggregate the results from these bool functions, although you can create a single monolithic delegate using +=, you'd be creating a delegate which you'd never actually want to call directly, which to me seems pretty confusing from a maintenance perspective. Using a List<Func<string, bool>> avoids that quite cleanly. – Simon MᶜKenzie Jun 1 '12 at 4:31
    
@BenVoigt Thanks... Changed – Jacob Seleznev Jun 1 '12 at 4:31
    
@Jacob Thanks for all of the hard work on this. It's definitely been helpful to watch the edits. Unfortunately, the resulting lambda filters out all items even though there are several rows in my data where all 5 conditions are true. – Trey Carroll Jun 1 '12 at 4:57

Here is my favorite method of accomplishing what you are asking for.

private Func<SurveyUserView, bool> _getFilterLambda(IDictionary<string, string> filters)
{
    List<Func<SurveyUserView, bool>> invokeList = new List<Func<SurveyUserView, bool>>();

    invokeList.Add((SurveyUserView surveyUserView) => surveyUserView.deleted != "deleted");

    if (filters.ContainsKey("RegionFilter"))
    {
        invokeList.Add((SurveyUserView surveyUserView) => surveyUserView.Region == filters["RegionFilter"]);
    }

    if (filters.ContainsKey("LanguageFilter"))
    {
        invokeList.Add((SurveyUserView surveyUserView) => surveyUserView.Locale == filters["LanguageFilter"]);
    }

    if (filters.ContainsKey("StatusFilter"))
    {
        invokeList.Add((SurveyUserView surveyUserView) => surveyUserView.Status == filters["StatusFilter"]);
    }

    if (filters.ContainsKey("DepartmentFilter"))
    {
        invokeList.Add((SurveyUserView surveyUserView) => surveyUserView.department == filters["DepartmentFilter"]);
    }

    return delegate (SurveyUserView surveyUserView)
    {
        bool unfiltered = true;

        foreach(var filter in invokeList)
        {
            unfiltered = unfiltered && filter(surveyUserView);
        }

        return unfiltered;
    };
}

We build a list of each of the delegates you want to apply; and then return another seperate delegate that iterates over that list combining each of the filters with a simple logical AND.

This works because the delegate we're returning closes over invokeList; creating a kind of private variable that stores all of our new delegates that travels with our returned delegate.

An alternative which is slightly closer syntactically to your original is:

private Func<SurveyUserView, bool> _getFilterLambda(IDictionary<string, string> filters)
{
    Func<SurveyUserView, bool> invokeList = (SurveyUserView surveyUserView) => surveyUserView.deleted != "deleted";

    if (filters.ContainsKey("RegionFilter"))
    {
        invokeList += (SurveyUserView surveyUserView) => surveyUserView.Region == filters["RegionFilter"];
    }

    if (filters.ContainsKey("LanguageFilter"))
    {
        invokeList += (SurveyUserView surveyUserView) => surveyUserView.Locale == filters["LanguageFilter"];
    }

    if (filters.ContainsKey("StatusFilter"))
    {
        invokeList += (SurveyUserView surveyUserView) => surveyUserView.Status == filters["StatusFilter"];
    }

    if (filters.ContainsKey("DepartmentFilter"))
    {
        invokeList += (SurveyUserView surveyUserView) => surveyUserView.department == filters["DepartmentFilter"];
    }

    return delegate (SurveyUserView surveyUserView)
    {
        bool unfiltered = true;

        // implicit cast from Delegate to Func<SurveyUserView, bool> happening on next line
        foreach (Func<SurveyUserView, bool> filter in invokeList.GetInvocationList())
        {
            unfiltered = unfiltered && filter(surveyUserView);
        }

        return unfiltered;
    };
}

In this version we're really just using invokeList as a list for the delegates; we call GetInvocationList() (a method on the Delegate class Func derives from) to get a list of all the delegates that are combined to make the multi-cast delegate.

I personally prefer the first version because it is clearer what is happening behind the scenes.

Both of these are really the same as Jacob Seleznev's answer which I somehow missed before responding. They just bring the final delegate inside the method so that the method itself still satisfies Trey's original contract.

Finally, if all of the filters are order-independent with no side-effects we can write a version that will run the filters in parallel.

private Func<SurveyUserView, bool> _getFilterLambdaParallel(IDictionary<string, string> filters)
{
    List<Func<SurveyUserView, bool>> invokeList = new List<Func<SurveyUserView, bool>>();

    invokeList.Add((SurveyUserView surveyUserView) => surveyUserView.deleted != "deleted");

    if (filters.ContainsKey("RegionFilter"))
    {
        invokeList.Add((SurveyUserView surveyUserView) => surveyUserView.Region == filters["RegionFilter"]);
    }

    if (filters.ContainsKey("LanguageFilter"))
    {
        invokeList.Add((SurveyUserView surveyUserView) => surveyUserView.Locale == filters["LanguageFilter"]);
    }

    if (filters.ContainsKey("StatusFilter"))
    {
        invokeList.Add((SurveyUserView surveyUserView) => surveyUserView.Status == filters["StatusFilter"]);
    }

    if (filters.ContainsKey("DepartmentFilter"))
    {
        invokeList.Add((SurveyUserView surveyUserView) => surveyUserView.department == filters["DepartmentFilter"]);
    }

    return delegate (SurveyUserView surveyUserView)
    {
        int okCount = 0;
        Parallel.ForEach(invokeList, delegate (Func<SurveyUserView, bool> f)
        {
            if (f(surveyUserView))
            {
                System.Threading.Interlocked.Increment(ref okCount);
            }
        });
        return okCount == invokeList.Count;
    };
}

We use Parallel.ForEach to execute the filters in parallel. There is a slight complication that prevents us from using our simple boolean AND - there is no guarantee that the logical AND will happen atomically creating a nasty race condition.

To fix that we simply count the number of filters that were passed through using Interlocked.Increment which is guaranteed to be atomic. If all the filters passed through successfully then we know we can return true; otherwise the and would have failed.

The equivalent for doing a logical OR here would have to check with okCount was more than zero.

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