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I have a Java method which has to execute a block of code many times:

            // Obtengo los 7 bits de direccion
            clockStateIndex = dataStateIndex;
            for(int bit = 7; bit > 0; --bit){           
                clockStateIndex = clockSource.nextClearBit(clockStateIndex);                    // Siguiente bit en SCL
                clockStateIndex = clockSource.nextSetBit(clockStateIndex);
                testIndex = (clockSource.nextClearBit(clockStateIndex) - clockStateIndex)/2;    // Busco la mitad del bit clock
                bitSet(direccion, data.get(testIndex), bit);                // Compruebo SDA en la mitad del bit SCL
            }
            // Obttengo el bit R/W
            clockStateIndex = clockSource.nextClearBit(clockStateIndex);    // Siguiente bit en SCL
            clockStateIndex = clockSource.nextSetBit(clockStateIndex);
            testIndex = (clockSource.nextClearBit(clockStateIndex) - clockStateIndex)/2;    // Busco la mitad del bit clock
            rwBit = data.get(testIndex);        // Obtengo el estado del bit R/W en el medio del bit SCL

            // Obtengo el bit de ACK
            clockStateIndex = clockSource.nextClearBit(clockStateIndex);    // Siguiente bit en SCL
            clockStateIndex = clockSource.nextSetBit(clockStateIndex);
            testIndex = (clockSource.nextClearBit(clockStateIndex) - clockStateIndex)/2;    // Busco la mitad del bit clock
            ackBit = data.get(testIndex);       // Obtengo el estado del bit R/W en el medio del bit SCL

            // Si tengo un ACK obtengo los 8 bits de dato
            if(ackBit == false){
                for(int bit = 8; bit > 0; --bit){           
                    clockStateIndex = clockSource.nextClearBit(clockStateIndex);    
                    clockStateIndex = clockSource.nextSetBit(clockStateIndex);
                    testIndex = (clockSource.nextClearBit(clockStateIndex) - clockStateIndex)/2;    
                    bitSet(i2cData, data.get(testIndex), bit);      
                }
            }

As you can see the code:

clockStateIndex = clockSource.nextClearBit(clockStateIndex);    
clockStateIndex = clockSource.nextSetBit(clockStateIndex);
testIndex = (clockSource.nextClearBit(clockStateIndex) - clockStateIndex)/2;    

Is repeated lot of times. I cannot create #defines to simplify my code doing something like nextBit(); to replace that code. Is there any other way to simplify it ? If a create a method i will have to pass two BitSet which size is about 200 elements and return 2 int elements (i dont know hot to do it in Java because i dont have pointers like in C)

Hope you can help me :)

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3  
Actually, when it comes to objects in Java, all you have is pointers (references) and you don't have objects at all. Passing an object to a method requires the number of bytes needed for an address (4 or 8, usually) regardless of the size of the object. Create a method. –  Ted Hopp Jun 1 '12 at 3:35
    
@TedHopp: True. –  jonnyGold Jun 1 '12 at 3:36
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would wrap it in a function:

// Instance based (inside classes)
{SCOPE MODIFIER} void ClockWork()
{
    clockStateIndex = clockSource.nextClearBit(clockStateIndex);    
    clockStateIndex = clockSource.nextSetBit(clockStateIndex);
    testIndex = (clockSource.nextClearBit(clockStateIndex) - clockStateIndex) / 2;  
}

As for a static based method, it depends on where you are implementing the code.

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Without resorting to pre-compiler text processing, @Cole is on the right track. Of course, copy-pasta code for performance is OK. Tastes bad, but is fast. –  jonnyGold Jun 1 '12 at 3:33
    
@jonnyGold Im working on adding code –  Cole Johnson Jun 1 '12 at 3:33
    
Yes but all the variables are inside the method so i will have to pass them to the new method, does it affect too much in performance ? clockSource is a BitSet of about 200 elements and i have to return 2 elements (testIndex and clockStateIndex) how i do that ? –  Andres Jun 1 '12 at 3:37
    
@Andres I would wrap it in a class then if it is that big. Working on an array like that is bad. –  Cole Johnson Jun 1 '12 at 3:39
    
It is inside an static class because it only decode a BitSet into data returning an Object i have created, why working whit BitSet on that way is bad ? –  Andres Jun 1 '12 at 3:42
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Simplest solution would be creating an object for this operation:

class ClockState {
    private int clearBit;
    private int setBit;
    private int testIndex;

    public ClockState( int clearBit, int setBit, int testIndex ) {
        this.clearBit = clearBit;
        this.setBit = setBit;
        this.testIndex = testIndex;
    }

    public int getClearBit() { return this.clearBit; }
    public int getSetBit() { return this.setBit; }
    public int getTestIndex { return this.textIndex; }

    public static ClockState create( ClockSource clockSource, int clockStateIndex ) {
      int clearBit = clockSource.nextClearBit(clockStateIndex);    
      int setBit = clockSource.nextSetBit(clearBit);
      int testIndex = (clockSource.nextClearBit(setBit) - setBit)/2; 
      return new ClockState( clearBit, setBit, testIndex );
    }

}

And your code would then look like this:

        clockStateIndex = dataStateIndex;
        for(int bit = 7; bit > 0; --bit){           
            ClockState state = ClockState.create( clockSource, clockStateIndex );
            clockStateIndex = state.getSetBit();
            bitSet(direccion, data.get(state.getTestIndex()), bit);
        }

And so on for all the other calls.

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