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For example:

public class A {

public class B extends A {
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    A a;
    a = new B();
}

}

I searched some similar questions and they showed "yes, a superclass type variable can refer to a subclass object". But in eclipse the above code comes up with an error like "No enclosing instance of type A is accessible. Must qualify the allocation with an enclosing instance of type A (e.g. x.new A() where x is an instance of A)."

So what wrong? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Possible duplicate of Java - No enclosing instance of type Foo is accessible – fabian Mar 4 at 0:05

The answer is "yes" superclass can refer to a subclass, but you're asking the wrong question.

You're getting this error because B is an enclosed class of A (meaning you must have an instance of A to have an instance of B), but you're referring to it from a static method (ie not an instance of A).

Simply change B to be a static class.

public class A {

    public static class B extends A { // <-- Added static keyword
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        A a;
        a = new B();
    }
}

No errors.

The other option is leave it an enclosed class and do this:

public class A {

    public class B extends A { // leave B as an enclosed class
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        A a = new A();
        a = a.new B();  // can only create a B in the context of an A
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I see! Thanks so much! :) – Echo Jun 1 '12 at 3:56
    
@user1429807 Note the alternative, and equally valid, solution to your error. You may find the syntax instructive. – Bohemian Jun 1 '12 at 4:02
1  
Just to confirm, wouldn't this result in a NullPointerException as is? I.e. don't you need a non-null instance of A to instantiate an instance of B with? – SimonC Jun 1 '12 at 4:51
    
@SimonC It sure would explode. I edited the question from A a; to A a = new A(). Thanks for noticing that! – Bohemian Jun 1 '12 at 5:41
    
Dear downvoter - exactly how is this question not helpful? – Bohemian Jun 1 '12 at 5:42

check your parantheses!! It should be:

class A {
}
public class B extends A {


public static void main(String[] args) {
    A a;
    a = new B();
}

}

Also you have two public classes in your code!!

share|improve this answer
    
You have changed the code so that the main() is in B, but the question is about code in A. See my answer for the correct explanation. – Bohemian Jun 1 '12 at 3:55
    
@user1429807: two public classes cannot be in the same file. Either you put them in two different files if you want to keep both of them public or make one of them default. – WickeD Jun 1 '12 at 3:56
    
Again... see my answer. All I added was the keyword static to his code in one place, and made no other changes, and voila, problem solved. I suggest you actually read my answer btw. Your last comment suggests you have not done so, otherwise you wouldn't have made your irrelevant comment about two public classes (which the code in the question does not have) – Bohemian Jun 1 '12 at 3:58
    
@Bohemian: yup.. read it and got it!! i mistook it as a problem of parantheses... my bad!! – WickeD Jun 1 '12 at 4:00
    
btw, I added an alternative solution you may be interested in where B is left as an enclosed class – Bohemian Jun 1 '12 at 4:05

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