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I'm trying to create a dynamic site where I have three floating boxes next to eachother. They are 33.33% in width each. The container div around them is 75% in width.

I've found an article about the problem here: CSS: Jumping columns
I've also found an example of the same problem here: Jumping columns example

Drag the window size to see the jumping in IE7 or earlier.

Anyone knows if it's possible to get around this? (without Javascript)

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4 Answers 4

I use two different solutions depending on the situation. First, try the Nicole Sullivan approach (using overflow: hidden; on the final element in a row instead of float/width):

http://www.stubbornella.org/content/2009/07/23/overflow-a-secret-benefit/

.container {
  width: 75%;
}

.box1 {
  width: 33.33%;
  float: left;
  display: inline; /* fixes another IE bug */
}

.box2 {
  overflow: hidden;
}

This works in most cases.

Failing that, I add a negative margin of several pixels to the last element instead.

.box2 {
  width: 33.33%;
  float: left;
  display: inline; /* fixes another IE bug */
  margin-right: -3px;
}

If that last element is floated right instead, just add the negative margin to the left. So far that has worked for me in the few cases where overflow didn't fit.

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This secret benefit of the overflow property is sexy –  Rubens Mariuzzo Jul 2 '12 at 18:50

In a situation like this, I would tend to get round the problem using an IE-only stylesheet that fudges the values until they work. In this case, just set the widths to 33%, it won't be perfect but then that's just the nature of the web.

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Thanks Rory. I know it could be solved that way and I might be forced to do that in case noone else have a better idea. It's a kind of an ugly way to solve it. –  Jenst Jul 5 '09 at 18:35
    
It's also a necessity in many cases unfortunately. The least ugly/hackish way to go about it would be conditional comments. –  Sam DeFabbia-Kane Jul 5 '09 at 21:37
    
"It's a kind of an ugly way to solve it" yes and no, okay you could call it a hack but I'd be very surprised if anyone can come up with something neater, most IE6 hacks are far worse! –  roryf Jul 6 '09 at 14:10
    
I don't mind the hack. 33.33% gives the jumping in IE and if I change that to for example 33% to prevent the jumping, the widths are too small at some sizes. 33% is a wrong number, and then the widths get wrong. That's what bugging me. –  Jenst Jul 7 '09 at 14:41

I think that a simple answer might be to not round at all, just create a final "spacer" element with a 1% width that shares the look of the 1/3rd elements. Even IE should be able to deal with a 33 + 33 + 33 + 1 rounding.

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I had the same problem. ie7 did not render 33.33% correctly. It would work with 33% but then it was a hairline off. I used the advice from the second block of code in the first response above, plus a little ie hack. It worked for me, I hope it helps.

.all-boxes {
   width: 33.33%;
   float: left;
   display: inline;
   *margin-right: -1px; /* Add the asterisk */
 }

The margin value might need to change based on your implementation, but 1px worked for me.

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