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I need to do some inserts in a cursor over about 300000 rows, this is however running slowly, any ideas on how i can make it run faster? Can i speed it up by batching the commits? So for example i would perform a commit after the 1000th row

DECLARE

  CURSOR test_cursor IS 
    SELECT a from database.mytable
BEGIN

  FOR curRow IN test_cursor LOOP

    insert into tableb (testval)
    values ('something');

  commit;

  END LOOP;
END; 
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4 Answers 4

300000 rows is not that many rows. Unless the rows are each extremely large, you should not commit in the middle of the batch.

Intermediate commits will only achieve:

  • additional overhead because each commit creates additional work,
  • loss of restartability in case of error (and loss of transactional integrity),
  • greater chance of running into ORA-1555

If your process is really a cursor with a single insert inside the loop, you should run a single statement:

BEGIN
   INSERT INTO tableb (col1..coln) (SELECT col1..coln FROM database.mytable);
END;

If you still need extra performance, you could look into direct insert and parallel operation but It might be over-optimization with "only" 300k rows.

By far the single greatest optimization available to you is to think in term of sets instead of the traditional procedural approach that consists of batches of single row statements.

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+1 For not committing inside a loop, in nearly all cases it's a bad idea. –  Wolf Jun 1 '12 at 15:53

Or you can try this:

DECLARE
  CURSOR test_cursor IS 
    SELECT col1 from table_a;

  TYPE fetch_array IS TABLE OF test_cursor%ROWTYPE;
  test_array fetch_array;

  l_errors                              PLS_INTEGER;
  l_dml_errors                          EXCEPTION;
  PRAGMA EXCEPTION_INIT(l_dml_errors, -24381);    

BEGIN

  open test_cursor;
  loop
    fetch test_cursor bulk collect into test_array limit 10000;
    forall i in 1..test_array.count save exceptions
      insert into table_b(col1)
      values(test_array(i).col1);
      exit when test_cursor%notfound;
  end loop;
  close test_cursor;
  commit;

EXCEPTION 
WHEN l_dml_errors THEN
    l_errors := SQL%BULK_EXCEPTIONS.COUNT;
    dbms_output.put_line('Number of INSERT statements that failed: ' || l_errors);
    FOR i IN 1 .. l_errors
    LOOP
      dbms_output.put_line('Error #' || i || ' at '|| 'iteration #' || SQL%BULK_EXCEPTIONS(i).ERROR_INDEX);
      dbms_output.put_line('Error message is ' || SQLERRM(-SQL%BULK_EXCEPTIONS(i).ERROR_CODE));
    END LOOP;
END; 
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I prefer the three lines of Vincent's answer ... –  Rob van Wijk Jun 1 '12 at 10:30
    
Be careful with collections. Few weeks ago, I've been fighting memory leaks on our 10.2.0.3, which were caused by such bulk operations. We have found out, that this was a bug, that should be fixed in 10.2.0.4. –  ipip Jun 1 '12 at 12:13

I would not recommend a cursor approach for this. I use append parallel hints for situations like this. Most of the time your query literally runs N times as fast where N is the parallel degree. It is occasionally a good idea to bypass disaster recovery with nologging / noarchivelog.

For truly large migrations (dozens to hundreds of GB), I've found it's a good idea to batch on a table's natural key (date, usually). Some small amount of state around it can let you cancel + resume the migration at will if necessary.

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May Be This will help you please try this

DECLARE
i number;
  CURSOR test_cursor IS 
    SELECT a from database.mytable
BEGIN

  FOR curRow IN test_cursor LOOP

    insert into tableb (testval)
    values ('something');
i:i+1;
if mod(i,1000)=0 then
  commit;
end if;
  END LOOP;
commit;
END; 
share|improve this answer
    
-1 Doesn't attack the root cause, only reduces the number of commits instead of getting rid of the commits altogether, and above all: this code is not tested and does not work they way you intended. –  Rob van Wijk Jun 1 '12 at 10:33

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