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I have a machine learning problem in which the available data has been divided into a training set and a test set. I apply my learning algorithm with the help of k-Fold cross-validation on the training set using values of k between 2 and 20.

Now after running my learning algorithm with cross validation on the training set I apply the newly generated model to the test set and find the generalization error is higher than what I would have expected based upon the cross validation results. So now I repeat the process using the same data split as before, but with different parameters in the learning algorithm.

Are there any hard and fast rules regarding how often one can re-use the test set in this process? I would suspect that after a few rounds one is in danger of overfitting on the test data, so that the system will then behave poorly in a real application. For this reason I would like to know if there is a generally accepted rule of thumb or theoretical result saying how often one can check the results of the learning algorithm on the test set before one needs to get a new test set.

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You may also want to check stats.stackexchange.com. It is Stack Overflow for statistics and Machine Learning. –  B Seven Dec 2 '12 at 23:13
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1 Answer

You can use test set any number of times as long as its data is not used for training. Applying model to the test set doesn't affect neither test set, nor the model - trained model is just a function of data you pass to it. Also note, that error on test set is almost always larger than on cross validation, since training algorithm itself tries to optimize model for train set, not for test set. The most simple and robust way to lower error on test set is to train model on larger dataset. Another approach, that helps to lower specifically generalization error, is using regularization. See VII part of ML class for details.

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