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How do I, in a single expression, get a dictionary where one key-value pair has been added to a sub-dictionary in some input dictionary? The input dictionary should be left unchanged. It can be assumed the sub-dictionary does exist and that the new key-value pair is not already in the sub-dictionary.

Update 2 (see below for definition of "SOsurvivalConditions", etc.):

The most concise way is:

(SOsurvivalConditions['firstCondition'].setdefault('synonym', 'A modern form of RTFM is: Google It.'), SOsurvivalConditions)[-1]

Update 1 :

This meets the given requirements and does not have the side-effect of modifying the input dictionary:

dict((k,dict(v, synonym='A modern form of RTFM is: Google It.') if k == "firstCondition" else v) for k,v in SOsurvivalConditions.iteritems())

However the more concise (but statement only) way can be adapted with a helper function, e.g.:

import copy
def dictDeepAdd(inputDict, dictKey, newKey, newValue):
    """
      Adds new key-value pair to a sub-dictionary and
      returns a new version of inputDict.

      dictKey is the key in inputDict for which a new
      key-value pair is added.

      Side-effect: none (does not change inputDict).
    """
    toReturn = copy.deepcopy(inputDict)
    toReturn[dictKey][newKey] = newValue
    return toReturn

dictDeepAdd(
                 SOsurvivalConditions,
                 'firstCondition',
                 'synonym',
                 'A modern form of RTFM is: Google It.'
           )


The Example:

goodStyle = \
{
    'answer': 'RTFM responses are not acceptable on StackOverflow - Joel Spolsky has repeatly said so in the StackOverflow podcasts.',
    'RTFM'  : 'RTFM is, in the less offensive version, an abbrevation for Read The Fine Manual.',
}

SOsurvivalConditions = \
{
    'moodImperative' : 'be happy',
    'firstCondition' : goodStyle,
}

'firstCondition' in SOsurvivalConditions now has 2 key-value pairs. A new key-value pair, ('synonym', 'A modern form of RTFM is: Google It.'), needs to be appended and the result should be available in a single expression.

This works (one line, but broken into several here):

{
    'moodImperative': SOsurvivalConditions['moodImperative'],
    'firstCondition' :
        dict(
               SOsurvivalConditions['firstCondition'],
               synonym = 'A modern form of RTFM is: Google It.'
            )
}

and returns:

{'moodImperative': 'be happy', 'firstCondition': {'answer': 'RTFM responses are not acceptable on StackOverflow - Joel Spolsky has repeatly said so in the StackOverflow podcasts.', 'RTFM': 'RTFM is, in the less offensive version, an abbrevation for Read The Fine Manual.', 'synonym': 'A modern form of RTFM is: Google It.'}}

However there is a lot of redundancy in this expression - all keys are repeated. And 'firstCondition' appears two times. Is there a more elegant way?

(The names and the content of the datastructures here are made up, but represent a real problem I encountered today. Python version: 2.6.2.).

share|improve this question
    
I fail to see how the "single-line" constraint can possibly "represent a real problem". The values in SOsurvivalConditions are of heterogeneous types -- one string, one dict -- and all the solutions presented (yours and others) will explode if one attempts to add the new entry to the string; surely it's worth an extra line or two to be robust in the face of such possible errors. And, you never clarify if you want to alter the original structures, or build entirely new ones -- in real problems, this kind of little detail usually does matter!-) –  Alex Martelli Jul 5 '09 at 22:14
    
I want to transform the input (without changing it) and pass the result to a function. So would a helper function instead of a single expression be the preferred solution then? –  Peter Mortensen Jul 5 '09 at 22:41
    
I would indeed suggest a helper function, I'm going to edit my answer to suggest one. –  Alex Martelli Jul 5 '09 at 23:06

4 Answers 4

SOsurvivalConditions['firstCondition']['synonym'] = 'A modern form of RTFM is: Google It.'
share|improve this answer
    
This will change SOsurvivalConditions. But is it an expression that will return a value? E.g. could I call a function with the above line and expect that the function get passed the (updated) dictionary? –  Peter Mortensen Jul 5 '09 at 19:52
    
No, it won't return a value. Is it a requirement that it returns the dictionary in the single line? If so, could you explain the context of what's going on a bit more? –  Evan Fosmark Jul 5 '09 at 20:09
    
It is for use in a Django urls.py file where I want to pass (extra) captured information from the URL for use in the template HTML file. Perhaps using helper functions instead of single expressions is the simpler solution. –  Peter Mortensen Jul 5 '09 at 22:27
    
@Peter, I agree with the helper function idea, esp. now that you've specified in a comment that you don't want to modify the original data, just to return modified copies -- see my just-edited answer for details of my suggestions given these clarified specs. –  Alex Martelli Jul 5 '09 at 23:21

Are you looking for dict.update (documentation here)?

SOsurvivalConditions['firstCondition'].update({'synonym': 'A modern form of RTFM is: Google It.'})

is what, I think, you want.

share|improve this answer
    
It returns None, which is not what he says he wants;-) –  Alex Martelli Jul 5 '09 at 22:15
    
His question utterly lacked clarity. :P –  Seth Johnson Jul 5 '09 at 22:56

Here's one that does meet your peculiar specs (to within the ambiguity with which you've specified them):

(SOsurvivalConditions['firstCondition'].setdefault('synonym', 'A modern form of RTFM is: Google It.'), SOsurvivalConditions)[-1]

This does modify the initial data structures (rather than creating new ones, as @truppo's answer does), and is also an expression returning the overall dictionary (rather than being a statement, like @Evan's answer, or returning None, like @Seth's).

Of course many variants are possible (if you want the new entry to override an existing one with the same key 'synonym', rather than leave any such existing entry alone, you could use __setitem__ instead of setdefault, for example -- it's hard to guess what you want to happen in such corner cases, as your initial specs are so desperately ambiguous and there's no "real use case" context given to help disambiguate them).

Edit: with use case now clarified in comments (no changing the original data structures, and an expression is indeed needed, but a helper function would be OK) here's what I would suggest:

def addSubEntry(mainDict, outerKey, innerKey, innerValue):
    # copy inner and outer dicts to avoid altering initial data
    result = dict(mainDict)
    inner = dict(result.get(outerKey, {}))
    inner[innerKey] = innerValue
    result[outerKey] = inner
    return result

and as the desired expression, use:

addSubEntry(SOsurvivalConditions, 'firstCondition', 'synonym', 'A modern form of RTFM is: Google It.')

Several variants are possible depending on the exact behavior desired in corner cases. This version adds a new dictionary (with just the given inner key-value pair) if there was previously no entry with the given outer-key; if there was such a previous entry, it tries to make it into a dict (even if it was, say, a list of key-value tuples), raising an exception if that's just unfeasible. A stricter version (demanding that the inner entry already existed and was a dict or dict-like object, raising exception instead) might instead use

inner = result[outerKey].copy()

as the second statement in the body.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the harsh words. I learned a lot today. –  Peter Mortensen Jul 5 '09 at 23:02
    
Always glad to help;-). Let me edit my answer to suggest a good "helper function". –  Alex Martelli Jul 5 '09 at 23:07

This works, but its not pretty and I think you are probably going too far with your lambda/oneliner/whatever you are trying to do :)

dict((k,dict(v, synonym='A modern form of RTFM is: Google It.') if k == "firstCondition" else v) for k,v in SOsurvivalConditions.iteritems())
share|improve this answer

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