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Ok, I know that Select((x, i) => ...) does not have a literal form but I have a fairly complex query which now has a new requirement making half of the projected output fields be dependent on output "row number". Is there any way, even an ugly one to introduce index and retain one query in literal form?

Also please note that not all source rows participate in result so I cannot just project source into enumerable indexed tuples, indexes have to be applied before final projection and after all the joins and wheres.

Edit:

The original query is large so its pointless to put it here, let ssimplify with pseudo

from a in source
where somecondition(a)
join b in source2 on a.key equals b.key
where someothercondition(a, b)
select new
{
    f1 = a.f1,
    oldf2 = func(a.field, b.field),
    newf2 = func(a.field, b.field, index)
    // ... (20 somthing more projected fields)
}

I need index for newf2 and I need it without splitting the query in two queries

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2  
your question is not clear. Please add some sample code. –  jeroenh Jun 1 '12 at 8:58
    
Is this LINQ to SQL? –  Tim Schmelter Jun 1 '12 at 9:17
    
no, its regular linq –  mmix Jun 1 '12 at 9:18
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want this "in one query", with the majority in "literal form", you'd have to do something like:

from t in
    (
        (
            from a in source
            where somecondition(a)
            join b in source2
            on a.key equals b.key
            where someothercondition(a, b)
            select new { a = a, b = b }
        ).Select((x, i) => new { index = i, a = x.a, b = x.b } )
    )
select new {
    f1 = t.a.f1,
    oldf2 = func(t.a.field, t.b.field),
    newf2 = func(t.a.field, t.b.field, t.index)
    // ... (20 somthing more projected fields) } 

but this is horrible.

I'd prefer to put it all in . form:

a
    .Where(a => somecondition(a))
    .Join(b, a => a.key, b => b.key, (a,b) => new { a = a, b = b })
    .Where(pair => somecondition(pair.a, pair.b))
    .Select((t, i) => new
        {
            f1 = t.a.f1,
            oldf2 = func(t.a.field, t.b.field),
            newf2 = func(t.a.field, t.b.field, i)
            // ...
        });

The join syntax is more ugly, but at least you're not mixing up syntaxes.

You might even prefer to do

var pairs = 
    from a in source
    where somecondition(a)
    join b in source2
    on a.key equals b.key
    where someothercondition(a, b)
    select new { a = a, b = b };

var indexedPairs = pairs.Select((x, i) => new { index = i, a = x.a, b = x.b } );

var projectedIndexedPairs =
    from t in indexedPairs
    select new {
        f1 = t.a.f1,
        oldf2 = func(t.a.field, t.b.field),
        newf2 = func(t.a.field, t.b.field, t.index)
        // ... (20 somthing more projected fields)
        };

but that's not "in one query"...

(This is a lot of LINQ, there may be some syntax errors in there, but you get the general idea.)

BLINDING FLASH OF INSPIRATION

Your mention of let magic made me thik of this. It seems to work in a quick example I wrote up.

// Copious commenting to explain what you're doing.
int x = 0;

// Copious commenting to explain what you're doing.
var query =
    from a in source
    where somecondition(a)
    join b in source2
    on a.key equals b.key
    where someothercondition(a, b)
    let i = x++
    select new {
        f1 = a.f1,
        oldf2 = func(a.field, b.field),
        newf2 = func(a.field, b.field, i),
        // ... (20 somthing more projected fields)
        };

Update: this is rather fragile. For example, if you iterate query twice, the index keeps incrementing. (I.e. it doesn't reset to zero.)

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Yes, the third one is the solution I am currently considering, but would hate it :) I am hoping for some join or let magic :) that I can't think of. The first solution is simply a condensed variation of the third, and I am seriously looking to avoid #2 because of the complexity of the query. I could refactor it but that would be an act of hatred towards the person coming after me :) –  mmix Jun 1 '12 at 9:31
    
@mmix Watch this space, I think I have something... –  Rawling Jun 1 '12 at 9:38
    
@mmix This seems to work, give it a try. If it does work, then sit down and try to work out why... –  Rawling Jun 1 '12 at 9:43
    
Yup, works like a charm, I can live with this :) I guess I couldn't see the forest for the trees :) –  mmix Jun 1 '12 at 9:49
    
@mmix OK. Just note (as in my recent edit) that it's a bit fragile, so make sure it's well-commented and you're careful. –  Rawling Jun 1 '12 at 9:51
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