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I am using SH shell and I am trying to compare a string with a variable's value but the if condition is always execute to true ? why ?

e.g. code.

Sourcesystem="ABC"

if [ "$Sourcesystem" -eq 'XYZ' ]; then 
    echo "Sourcesystem Matched" 
else
    echo "Sourcesystem is NOT Matched $Sourcesystem"  
fi;

echo Sourcesystem Value is  $Sourcesystem ;

even this is not working:

Sourcesystem="ABC"

if [ 'XYZ' -eq "$Sourcesystem" ]; then 
    echo "Sourcesystem Matched" 
else
    echo "Sourcesystem is NOT Matched $Sourcesystem"  
fi;

echo Sourcesystem Value is  $Sourcesystem ;

Secondly can we match this with NULL or Empty String ?

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6 Answers 6

You should use the = operator for string comparison:

Sourcesystem="ABC"

if [ "$Sourcesystem" = "XYZ" ]; then 
    echo "Sourcesystem Matched" 
else
    echo "Sourcesystem is NOT Matched $Sourcesystem"  
fi;

man test says that you use -z to match for empty strings.

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-eq is used to compare integers. Use = instead.

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-eq is a mathematical comparison operator. I've never used it for string comparison, relying on == and != for compares.

if [ 'XYZ' == 'ABC' ]; then   # Double equal to will work in Linux but not on HPUX boxes it should be if [ 'XYZ' = 'ABC' ] which will work on both
  echo "Match"
else
  echo "No Match"
fi
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Of the 4 shells that I've tested, ABC -eq XYZ evaluates to true in the test builtin for zsh and ksh. The expression evaluates to false under /usr/bin/test and the builtins for dash and bash. In ksh and zsh, the strings are converted to numerical values and are equal since they are both 0. IMO, the behavior of the builtins for ksh and zsh is incorrect, but the spec for test is ambiguous on this.

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-eq is the shell comparison operator for comparing integers. For comparing strings you need to use =.

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2  
-1: Do not use ==. It is only valid in a limited set of shells, and will produce unspecified behavior. –  William Pursell Jun 1 '12 at 14:11

I had this same problem, do this

if [ 'xyz'='abc' ];
then
echo "match"
fi

notice the whiteespace it is important that you dont use a whitespace in this case after or before the = sign

check out this link

http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/comparison-ops.html

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