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Why don't we use SHA-1, md5Sum and other standard cryptography hashes for hashing. They are smart enough to avoid collisions and are also not revertible. So rather then coming up with a set of new hash function , which might have collisions , why don't we use them. Only reason I am able to think is they require say large key say 32bit.But still avoiding collision so the look up will definitely be O(1).

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What is the question? –  biziclop Jun 1 '12 at 11:49
    
My guess is he had a interview question, in which they asked him why they didn't use those hash functions? Maybe they ment it in the way because you always have to salt your hashes? –  Lyrion Jun 1 '12 at 11:54
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Not to mention that they're awfully slow for a hash table. –  biziclop Jun 1 '12 at 11:58

2 Answers 2

  1. Because they are very slow, for two reasons:
    1. They aim to be crytographically secure, not only collision-resistant in general
    2. They produce a much larger hash value than what you actually need in a hash table
  2. Because they handle unstructured data (octet / byte streams) but the objects you need to hash are often structured and would require linearization first
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Why don't we use SHA-1, md5Sum and other standard cryptography hashes for hashing. They are smart enough to avoid collisions...

Wrong because:

  • Two inputs cam still happen to have the same hash value. Say the hash value is 32 bit, a great general-purpose hash routine (i.e. one that doesn't utilise insights into the set of actual keys) still has at least 1/2^32 chance of returning the same hash value for any 2 keys, then 2/2^32 chance of colliding with one of those as a third key is hashed, 3/2^32 for the fourth etc..
  • Having distinct hash values is a very different thing from having the hash values map to distinct hash buckets in a hash table. Hash values are generally modded into the table size to select a bucket, so at best - and again for general-purpose hashing - the chance of a collision when adding an element to a hash table is #preexisting-elements / table-size.

So rather then coming up with a set of new hash function , which might have collisions , why don't we use them.

Because speed is often the programmer's goal when choosing to use a hash table over say a binary tree. If the hash values are mathematically complicated to calculate, they may take a lot longer than using a slightly more (but still not particularly) collision prone but faster-to-calculate hash function. That said, there are times when more effort on the hashing can pay off - for example, when the hash table exists on magnetic disk and the I/O costs of seeking & reading records dwarfs hash calculation effort.

antti makes an interesting point about data too... general purpose hashing routines often work on blocks of binary data with a specific starting address and a number of bytes (they may even require that number of bytes to be a multiple of 2 or 4). In many applications, data that needs to be hashed will be intermingled with data that must not be included in the hash - such as cached values, file handles, pointers/references to other data or virtual dispatch tables etc.. A common solution is to hash the desired fields separately and combine the hash keys - perhaps using exclusive-or. As there can be bit fields that should be hashed in the same byte of memory as other data that should not be hashed, you sometimes need custom code to extract those values. Still, even if some copying and padding was required beforehand, each individual field could eventually be hashed using md5, SHA-1 or whatever and those hash values could be similarly combined, so this complication doesn't really categorically rule out the approach you're interested in.

Only reason I am able to think is they require say large key say 32bit.

All other things being equal, the larger the key the better, though if the hash function is mathematically ideal then any N of its bits - where 2^N >= # hash buckets - will produce minimal collisions.

But still avoiding collision so the look up will definitely be O(1).

Again, wrong as mentioned above.

(BTW... I stress general-purpose in a couple places above. That's just because there are trivial cases where you might have some insight into the keys you'll need to hash that allows you to position them perfectly within the available hash buckets. For example, if you knew the keys were the numbers 1000, 2000, 3000 etc. up to 100000 and that you had at least 100 hash buckets, you could trivially define your hash function as x/1000 and know you'd have perfect hashing sans collisions. This situation of knowing that all your keys map to distinct hash table buckets is known as "perfect hashing" - as per your question title - a good general-purpose hash like md5 is not a perfect hash, and indeed it makes no sense to talk about perfect hashing without knowing the complete set of possible keys).

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