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I load the same script in my page many times. I have some trouble on decide which is loaded first/after in my website, due to the async/load functions.

So, I'd like to put a global variable that count, when the script is loaded, the order of them.

So myScript.js will start with :

(function () {
    var privateNumberScriptLoaded;

    if (numberScriptLoaded === undefined) {
        numberScriptLoaded = 0;
    }
    else {
        numberScriptLoaded = numberScriptLoaded + 1;
    }

    privateNumberScriptLoaded = numberScriptLoaded;
    console.log(privateNumberScriptLoaded);
})();

but when I load it with :

<script src="http://www.mywebsite.com/widget/myScript.js?type=normal" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script src="http://www.mywebsite.com/widget/myScript.js?type=rotation" type="text/javascript"></script>

I get (for two times) numberScriptLoaded is not defined.

How can I resolve this trouble? In fact I'll "create" a global variable in my website if it doesnt exist. Than increment it and store in a "private" variable for each script, so I can save the order of the execution for each script.

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possible duplicate of How can I check whether a variable is defined in JavaScript? –  Felix Kling Jun 1 '12 at 13:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

At present, your script falls prey to The Horror of Implicit Globals. I'd recommend not doing that.

You have three options:

  1. As all global variables end up as properties on window, you could use window explicitly:

    if (!window.numberScriptLoaded) {
        window.numberScriptLoaded = 1; // 1, not 0
    }
    else {
        ++window.numberScriptLoaded;
    }
    

    Unlike the code without the window. prefix, that won't throw a ReferenceError, because looking up a property on an object works differently from resolving a freestanding identifier.

    Live demo | demo page source | source of script it loads

  2. Always put var numberScriptLoaded; (with no initializer) at global scope in your script, e.g. outside your scoping function:

    var numberScriptLoaded; // No initializer (no = 0 or anything)
    

    On the first load, this will create the variable; on subsequent loads, it's a no-op. Then you can do this without a ReferenceError:

    if (!numberScriptLoaded) {
        numberScriptLoaded = 1; // 1, not 0
    }
    else {
        ++numberScriptLoaded;
    }
    

    Live demo | demo page source | source of script it loads

  3. Use typeof. If you take the typeof a variable that doesn't exist, you don't get a ReferenceError; you get "undefined". Then you can create it via the window. prefix (so you're not falling prey to The Horror).

    if (typeof numberScriptLoaded === "undefined") {
        // Assigning to window.numberScriptLoaded creates the global
        window.numberScriptLoaded = 1; // 1, not 0
    }
    else {
        ++numberScriptLoaded;
    }
    

    Live demo | demo page source | source of script it loads

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2 - Always put var numberScriptLoaded; (with no initializer) at global scope in your script. : i need this variable "global" for the whole website, so the next script loaded can access to this variable. –  markzzz Jun 1 '12 at 13:46
    
P.S. in fact, except "typeof", I'm following the 3° option. What's wrong? –  markzzz Jun 1 '12 at 13:47
    
@markzzz: Re your first comment: Right, that's why I'm saying you put it at global scope. So it's a global. Re your second comment: See what I wrote; without typeof, you're trying to reference an identifier that isn't in scope, resulting in a ReferenceError. –  T.J. Crowder Jun 1 '12 at 13:56
    
How can you put a variable in global scope without "var"? –  markzzz Jun 1 '12 at 14:36
    
@markzzz: By assigning to a property on the global object, which is the container of all global variables. On browsers, there's a global variable, window, that refers to the global object. (It's a property the object uses to point to itself.) So window.foo = 2; creates a global variable called foo with the value 2. I've added demos of all three options for you. –  T.J. Crowder Jun 1 '12 at 15:45

You should use typeof

if (typeof numberScriptLoaded === 'undefined') {
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usually this work as well window.jQuery === undefined. What's the difference? –  markzzz Jun 1 '12 at 12:50
    
1) What's the point of using much slower === when typeof always returns string? 2) isn't if(numberScriptLoaded===undefined) a quicker/shorter/better solution? –  chester1000 Jun 1 '12 at 12:53
2  
The only difference is that undefined can be overwritten. undefined = 5; window.jQuery === undefined; compares the variable against 5 instead of testing if it is undefined. Since undefined is global, the fear is that a (stupid) library may overwrite it and you would not know. –  apsillers Jun 1 '12 at 12:53
    
@chester1000 much slower? compare to what? –  xdazz Jun 1 '12 at 12:54
1  
@chester1000: "1) What's the point of using much slower === when typeof always returns string?" Slower than what? "2) isn't if(numberScriptLoaded===undefined) a quicker/shorter/better solution?" Not if numberScriptLoaded isn't in scope, no; that's the reason the OP is getting a ReferenceError thrown in the first place! –  T.J. Crowder Jun 1 '12 at 14:01

Try

if ( 'undefined' === typeof numberScriptLoaded ) {
    numberScriptLoaded = 0;
} else {
    numberScriptLoaded = numberScriptLoaded + 1;
}
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Global variables are direct attributes of window object. So if you'd like to init global variable from anywhere just type:

window.variableName = "what_ever_you_want"
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As a best practice and to prevent this type of errors, all variables should be initialized before being used in your script.

You should put:

var numberScriptLoaded;

Just before your closure and the error won't happen.

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