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I have the next table:

Network adress    NetMask         Next Hop
128.96.166.0      255.255.255.0   1
128.96.166.0      255.255.252.0   2
0.0.0.0           0.0.0.0         3

I want to find the adreeses range, for which the router will send to each Hop. for example, the adress's IP: 128.96.166.0 would send to Hop 1.

I don't understand how the NetMak help me to detrmine it. Is it not always would go to hop 1?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, start reading the netmask in binary form. In this form the netmask is ALWAYS some 1s followed by 0s. The netmask tells you the length (in bits) of the relevant prefix (1 means relevant bit, 0 means not relevant bit). For instance 128.96.166.1 and 128.96.166.2 would be sent to Hop1 b/c if you only look at the first 24 bits both addresses have the same 24 first bits, just like the first 24 bits of the network address. However the address 128.96.167.1 would not be sent to Hop1, b/c the 24th bit is different. But the entry for Hop2 has a different netmask. The netmask for Hop2 says to look only at the first 22 bits. When only looking at the first 22 bits 128.96.167.1 matches the network address for Hop2 and packets addressed to 128.96.167.1 would be sent via Hop2.

Further: When looking at the first 22 bits the network addresses for Hop1 and Hop2 match 128.96.166.1 and 128.96.166.2. However, (normaly) any component will pick Hop1 for 128.96.166.1 and 128.96.166.2 because that rule matches more bits. This is called "longest prefix match" and concurs with the idea "if there are more matching bits this hop will get the packet closer to the final destination".

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The algorithm to decide is:

If (IP address BitwiseAND NetMask == NetwordAddress) Then
    Forward to Next Hop
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A simple ip subnet calculator online here: http://www.subnet-calculator.com/

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