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Using jQuery how does one detect clicks not on specific elements, and perform an action consequently?

I have the following JavaScript

$('#master').click(function() {
    $('#slave').toggle();
});

$(document).not('#master','#slave').click(function() {
    $('#slave').hide();
});

and I cannot see where I am going wrong logically. You can see a live example here

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1  
binding an instance of your click handler to every DOM element (except two) is going to be awful on performance. –  jbabey Jun 1 '12 at 13:39
1  
The reason why your version doesn't work is because you're testing whether the document element doesn't have master or slave as its ID. This is always true (IIRC document can't have an ID), so the handler is bound to the document and every click will cause slave to be hidden. Then, because of event propagation, the click event from #master will bubble up to the document where it will hide #slave, even though #master just toggled it. You need to test event.target to make this work. –  Mattias Buelens Jun 1 '12 at 13:54

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Since you're binding to the click event on the document, you can use event.target to get the element that initiated the event:

$(document).click(function(event) {
    if (!$(event.target).is("#master, #slave")) {
        $("#slave").hide();
    }
});

EDIT: As Mattias rightfully points out in his comment, the code above will fail to identify click events coming from descendants of #master and #slave (if there are any). In this situation, you can use closest() to check the event's target:

$(document).click(function(event) {
    if (!$(event.target).closest("#master, #slave").length) {
        $("#slave").hide();
    }
});
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1  
If #master or #slave have child elements, you need to use closest instead of is to make it work on those children. –  Mattias Buelens Jun 1 '12 at 14:04
    
@Mattias, very true. Answer updated accordingly, thanks :) –  Frédéric Hamidi Jun 1 '12 at 14:11
    
This is a poor substitute for delegate which is already implemented in jQuery. –  zzzzBov Sep 3 '12 at 22:14
    
@zzzzBov, not really, the goal here is to delegate all the click events to the document and to special-case two elements and their descendants. Are you sure you can achieve the same thing with delegate() (or rather on(), which supersedes it in recent releases)? –  Frédéric Hamidi Sep 3 '12 at 22:26
    
@FrédéricHamidi, easily, see my answer. –  zzzzBov Sep 3 '12 at 22:28

Event delegation has long been supported natively by jQuery. The difficulty lies in creating the appropriate selector. Originally, delegate was used, but more recently the delegate form of on should be used.

The purpose of event delegation is to listen to events on child elements and invoke the bound event handlers on those elements as though they had been bound to the child element, instead of the parent. This means that instead of binding handlers to every element in the DOM, you're binding a handler to every element in the initial selection (document is a single element). This also makes for a simple way to use a single selector to bind to an ever changing set of elements, as new elements will propagate their events to document whether or not they existed when the initial event handler was bound:

$(document).on('click', '*:not(#master, #master *, #slave, #slave *)', function (e) {
    //this will reference the clicked element
});

Additionally, note that I not only said the elements must not be #master or #slave, they must not be children of #master or #slave either.

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Very interesting. I usually avoid * selectors both in CSS (cascading is sufficient most of the time) and in jQuery (matching a whole subtree can be costly), but I agree this should work at least as well as event.target combined to closest() on modern browsers. Now I'm curious about the perfs, maybe I'll set up a benchmark in my copious free time. Cheers :) –  Frédéric Hamidi Sep 3 '12 at 22:37

Does this code do what you want? (not entirely sure if I understood correctly)

$('body').on('click', '*:not( #master, #slave )', function() {
    $('#slave').hide();
});

http://jsfiddle.net/gZ4Hz/8/

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Another thought, it may not be working because your browser may not be rendering body at 100% height; Try adjusting your base css to fix height of body and then a couple other thoughts.

e.stopPropagation(): Prevents the event from bubbling up the DOM tree, preventing any parent handlers from being notified of the event.

So if you change the first click code to the following:

$('#master').click(function(e) {
    e.stopPropagation();
    $('#slave').toggle();
});

Then you could change the call sign of the second too:

$("body, body *").not('#master, #slave').click(function(e) {
    $('#slave').hide();
});

And that should cover it. Give it a try! or see this jsFiddle

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Perfect! You just made me a happy man :) –  jacktheripper Jun 1 '12 at 13:54
1  
Binding event handlers to every other elements isn't a good idea. Frédéric Hamidi's solution is better. –  Joy Jun 1 '12 at 13:57
1  
That is a horrible solution. You're binding that second handler separately to every single element in the DOM. Not only is this terribly inefficient, it won't even work with dynamically inserted elements added to the DOM afterwards. Frédéric's solution is much more elegant and (more importantly) works in every situation. –  Mattias Buelens Jun 1 '12 at 13:58
    
I never said it was the best solution and it's not "horrible". I simply showed him how to achieve what he was trying to achieve. So many "professors" on here. lmao –  SpYk3HH Jun 1 '12 at 19:49

Fredrik's answers works for elements already present in the document, but it didn't work for elements fetched by ajax calls. I tried the following and it works for me. Sharing the code for future ajax coders.

    $(document).on('click',function(event) {
        if (!$(event.target).closest("#selector").length) {
            if ($('#selector').is(":visible"))
                $('#selector').slideUp();
        }
    });

Would have posted it as a comment but I don't have enough reputation for that.

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