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How does one detect the calling class from within a static method such that if the class is subclassed the subclass is detected? (See comment inside MakeInstance)

@interface Widget : NSObject
+ (id) MakeInstance;
@end

@implementation Widget
+ (id) MakeInstance{
    Class klass = //How do I get this?
    id instance = [[klass alloc] init];
    return instance;
}
@end

@interface UberWidget : Widget
//stuff
@end

@implementation UberWidget
//Stuff that does not involve re-defining MakeInstance
@end

//Somewhere in the program
UberWidget* my_widget = [UberWidget MakeInstance];
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1  
There are no static methods in Objective-C. Instead, there are class methods such as the one you've shown in your example. Note that method names should begin with a lowercase letter, e.g., makeInstance rather than MakeInstance. –  jlehr Jun 1 '12 at 14:05
1  
note that this is one of the important distinctions between Objective-C and Java and C++ -- in Java and C++ it would be impossible to do this –  newacct Jun 1 '12 at 18:19
    
@jlehr Thanks for the extra info. **Where I work, the upper case method name is the style convention for factory methods. I'll convey your concern to them ;) –  Brooks Jun 1 '12 at 23:08
    
If you're targeting Apple's platforms you'd be better off following their guidelines. Project teams that don't follow prevailing conventions aren't establishing new ones -- they're just undermining those that already exist. Nothing is accomplished by doing that. –  jlehr Jun 2 '12 at 16:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I believe the appropriate solution for what you are trying to accomplish is this:

+ (id) MakeInstance{
    id instance = [[self alloc] init];
    return instance;
}

And as Cyrille points out, it should probably return [instance autorelease] if you want to follow convention (and aren't using ARC).

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That should do it, assuming you add an autorelease to your initializer. –  Cyrille Jun 1 '12 at 13:59

UIAdam's solution is perfectly fine for your case. Although if you want to detect, more specifically, from which class is you method called, use [self class] on objects, or simply self for classes.

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