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I'm attempting to make a system which allows users to chain together multiple processors. The difficulty I have is that each processor actually has two bits of information it cares about and I want these handled in a type-safe way. I've boiled it down to this problem:

Given:

//First family of stuff
trait A {
  def doA {}
}

trait B {
  def doB {}
} 

//Second family of stuff
trait X {
  def doX {}
}

trait Y {
  def doY {}
} 

I can combine elements from the two families together in 4 flavors:

var f = new A with X {}
f.doA
d.doX

var g = new A with Y {}
//...

Great. The problem is that I want each of the functions (doA, etc) to return a combination of the two types so that I can chain stuff together. Essentially I want to do: trait A { def doThing = { new A with ThingThatImMixedInWithLikeXOrY {} } }

Each processor needs to return an anonymous class which consists of 1) A type known to the processor 2) The type which it was mixed in with.

My first stab was to use generics, something like this:

trait A {
  this : {def makeWithT[TOther]} =>
  def doA = makeWithT[B]
}

trait B {
  this : {def makeWithT[TOther]} =>
  def doB = makeWithT[A]
}

trait X {
  this : {def makeWithS[TOther]} =>
  def doX = makeWithT[Y]
}

trait Y {
  this : {def makeWithS[TOther]} =>
  def doY = makeWithT[Y]
}

class Foo[T, S] extends S with T {
  def makeWithT[OtherT] = new T with OtherT
  def makeWithS[OtherT] = new S with OtherT
}

var f = new Foo[A, X]
f.doA.doB
f.doX.doA
f.doX.doY
...

Obviously, I've run into a catalog of problems:

  1. I can't make a generic class which extends from the type parameters

  2. I can't instantiate my anonymous class via a generic parameter

  3. I can't define the return type of the functions in the trait because I don't know the type until it's mixed in with something.

I'm a bit of a noob when it comes to scala, and I get the feeling that I'm going about this in totally the wrong way and maybe I should be using implicits and the CanBuildFrom pattern. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers

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2  
You minimized the problem and made it very abstract. For some cases it can be a good thing, but I think that in this particular case it would be more helpful if you will describe us concrete problem and the goal you want to archive. As far as I can see, in this question you are describing the (broken) solution to the problem that we don't know yet. If you will share it with us, may be we would be able to come up with another/better/working solution to the problem you are currently facing... –  tenshi Jun 1 '12 at 14:44
    
OK, Here goes. I want to have a grammar so that I can do things like dataSource.map(...).filter(...) Where dataSource is my own kind of stream. The problem is that there are other operations I want to perform on it which are not transformations, rather modifications to how the calculations are performed. For instance I might want to do datasource.asParallel.filter(...).asSequential. It's a slightly contrived example, but you can see that I have two groups of operations. The return type of asParallel needs to be something which exposes an asSequential operation. –  Tom Peck Jun 1 '12 at 17:41

1 Answer 1

The most known solution for stackable processors is stackable trait

http://www.artima.com/scalazine/articles/stackable_trait_pattern.html

trait StackableRoot {
  def StackablePass (x:Int) : x
}
trait StackableDouble extends StackableRoot {
  def internalPass (x:Int) = 2*x
  abstract override def StackablePass(x:Int) = super.StackablePass(internalPass(x))
}
trait StackableIncrement extends StackableRoot {
  def internalPass (x:Int) = x+1
  abstract override def StackablePass(x:Int) = super.StackablePass(internalPass(x))
}

there is some boilerplate with

  abstract override def StackablePass(x:Int) = super.StackablePass(internalPass(x))

that can't be avoided by packing into parametrized trait since it will require scala to inherit some trait with different parameters multiple times that is prohibited by famous type erasure

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