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public SPListItemCollection GetACollection()
{
    try
    {
        //Method to get an item collection from somewhere
        if(itemCol != null)
            return itemCol;
        else
            return null;
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        LogException(ex);
        return null;
    }
}

This method must return null (not an empty list) - regardless of whether an exception is caught or not. The above works - but is there a better way of doing it?

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4  
I just don't understand why you need if-else. –  Leri Jun 1 '12 at 14:35
    
You could just do in the try: return itemCol; instead of the if/else. –  RvdK Jun 1 '12 at 14:36
2  
If itemCol is an empty list (a collection instance containing 0 items), it will still be returned. –  C.Evenhuis Jun 1 '12 at 14:36
    
Naturally, you have to follow the specs. But the specs are making a mistake by requiring callers to check for null before using the collection. Invariably, someone will forget to check for null, and will receive a NullReferenceException. The use of exceptions keeps you from having to write code that has to remember to check for error codes since, if there is an "error", then an exception will be thrown, which can be caught by code that knows how to handle it (and only code which knows how to handle it). –  John Saunders Jun 1 '12 at 14:39

10 Answers 10

if(itemCol != null)
    return itemCol;
else
    return null;

simplifies to

return itemCol;

since if itemCol == null then returning itemCol already returns null. No reason to special case that behavior.

If you want to replace empty collections by null, you need to use something like:

if((itemCol != null) && itemCol.Any())
    return itemCol;
else
    return null;

A bit of design advice:

  • Swallowing exceptions is discouraged. You should only catch a few specific exception you know how to handle
  • Empty collections are often nicer to work with than null.
share|improve this answer
    
Thats exactly what I was just about to post!!! LOL :-) –  trumpetlicks Jun 1 '12 at 14:37
    
+1 for noting that swallowing exceptions is discouraged –  Mark Mullin Jun 1 '12 at 15:01

I must first say this is an awful thing to do, swallowing exceptions is TERRIBLE! DO NOT DO THIS! It will haunt you and make debugging very very difficult, even worse is returning null because of an exception - the null will typically end up throwing a NullReferenceException which will be far harder to debug than the exception that's being swallowed (even if it's logged), but since you asked:

public SPListItemCollection GetACollection()
{
    SPListItemCollection itemCol = null;
    try
    {
        //Method to get an item collection from somewhere
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        LogException(ex);
    }
    return itemCol;
}
share|improve this answer

Never liked a method with multi-exit-point,
In your catch set itemCol to null, outside the try/catch return itemCol

try
{
     // whatever
     if(itemCol.Count == 0) itemCol = null;
}
catch(Exception x)
{
     LogException(x);
     itemCol = null;
}
return itemCol;
share|improve this answer
    
This returns empty list not null –  Reniuz Jun 1 '12 at 14:42
    
@Reniuz right, need a check in try block –  Steve Jun 1 '12 at 14:45

To check weather a collection is empty, the Any() method is usefull, mostly if you don't have lists, but general IEnumerables. If you just want to get rid of the duplication of return null;, you can easily do so:

public SPListItemCollection GetACollection()
{
    try
    {
        //Method to get an item collection from somewhere
        if(itemCol.Any())
            return itemCol;
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        LogException(ex);
    }

    return null;
}

You can also append a

    finally
    {
        // Stuff that always needs to be done.
    }

directly after the closing bracket of your catch.

share|improve this answer
    
Remove the line if(itemCol != null) and I'll give you a +1. –  Joel Rondeau Jun 1 '12 at 14:39
    
Thats what I was doing right after seeing the other answers ;) –  linac Jun 1 '12 at 14:43

It's already good, imo, I would also remove the last else, like this:

public SPListItemCollection GetACollection()
{
    try
    {
        //Method to get an item collection from somewhere
        if(itemCol != null)
            return itemCol;

        //Some if/else code here presumably... 

        //NO ELSE HERE...
        return null;
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        LogException(ex);
        return null;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
4  
I would remove the if as well :) –  dasblinkenlight Jun 1 '12 at 14:36
    
@Tigran this does not make sense if itemCol is null return itemColl will be the same as return null. –  Leri Jun 1 '12 at 14:37
    
@dasblinkenlight: I suppose there are some other code too in the middle. Just suggested with caution. –  Tigran Jun 1 '12 at 14:37
    
Why not just return itemCol? –  Darren Davies Jun 1 '12 at 14:38
    
@DarrenDavies: I as I explained, I suppose the function code is not such simple as it presented. Cause the question is not about the code, but try/catch handling. That is. –  Tigran Jun 1 '12 at 14:39

You don't need if-else block, because you already return null if object is null:

public SPListItemCollection GetACollection()
{
    try
    {
        //Method to get an item collection from somewhere
        return itemCol;
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        LogException(ex);
        return null;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

How about this? If your spec says:

must return null (not an empty list)

Your current implementation will return an empty collection if the collection is not null, but empty. Unless you rely on the method to handle it.

This takes care of that...

public SPListItemCollection GetACollection()
{
    try
    {
        //Method to get an item collection from somewhere
        if(itemCol != null && itemCol.Count == 0)
            return itemCol;

        return itemCol;
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        LogException(ex);
    }

    return null;
}
share|improve this answer

I would do so:

public SPListItemCollection GetACollection()
{
    try
    {
        //Method to get an item collection from somewhere
        return itemCol != null && itemCol.Count == 0 ? null : itemCol;
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        LogException(ex);
        return null;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your code looks fine. If it fits your tastes better you can put the null return at the end:

public SPListItemCollection GetACollection()
{
    try
    {
        //Method to get an item collection from somewhere
        if(itemCol != null)
            return itemCol;
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        LogException(ex);
    }
    return null;
}
share|improve this answer

You mentioned that your current implementation works. I assume that the method used to get item collection returns either a collection with 1 or more items or null or throws an exception. If this true this would be one alternative.

public SPListItemCollection GetACollection()
{
   SPListItemCollection itemCol = null;
   try
   {
      itemCol = //Method to get an item collection from somewhere
   }
   catch(Exception e)
   {
      LogException(e);
   }
   return itemCol;
}
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