Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I find it extremely useful to use the Ctrl(cmd)+o shortcut on Eclipse to find a member field or method in a class (and use it again to get the ones from the super class).

However, I would like to know if there is a similar way to quickly search in the project and/or workspace for a field or method you know the name of but not where it is (similarly to how it is done to find a type Ctrl(cmd)+Shift+T or a resource Ctrl(cmd)+Shift+R).

If is not available where can I request for it :)

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
By the way, maybe it's obvious, but I found it only today - if you're searching a member or a method, which name you don't know for sure - you should press ctrl+o, type asterisk (* sign) in the edit field and then type part of the name you are searching. So I mean it supports masks. It will search in current class only of course. Very helpful! –  Tertium Nov 30 '13 at 9:37
add comment

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The closest thing I know of is the Java Search, which allows you to specify searching for a method, field, class, etc. If you're in the Java or Java Browsing perspective, Ctrl+H will open the Search dialog with Java Search as the selected type.

If you want to request a feature or enhancement, enter it into Eclipse's Bugzilla. Keep in mind that the backlog of feature requests is HUGE, so the most effective way to get yours noticed is to take initiative and submit a patch.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I know of that one, but given that the structure of the entire workspace is indexed (and hence the massive memory overhead among other things) I think this would be really helpful. –  pablisco Jun 1 '12 at 14:41
    
I'm not sure how practical a direct-search (ala Ctrl+Shift+T) would be for members; the number of members is probably at least 10x the number of classes in an average workspace. By the way, I'm pretty sure the entire index of Java is not in memory all the time. –  E-Riz Jun 1 '12 at 14:56
add comment

ctrl+o (cmd+o) opens the quick outline where you can search for a method within the current class. Pressing ctrl+o again extends the search scope to the complete class hierarchy.

share|improve this answer
1  
Oh, man! Thank you for this! This was exactly what I was looking for! When working with code that I hadn't seen before, I often wished there was some way to see if from a class I had access to certain objects or not. This does exactly that! Thank you again! –  Bonz0 Feb 14 at 21:28
    
the disadvantage is that you have to be in the class where the method was declared. Isn't there an outline grouped by class of the entire project. Just wondering! –  Razvan Jun 20 at 11:54
add comment

With the ctrl+h you will have some more options to search.

Under java search option you may find search for type, method, package, constuctor, field.

Also you may find "Limit To" option to narrow your search result and get precise search result!

share|improve this answer
add comment

ctrl+h will bring up java search option. Enter your string and see. It also has different patterns like .java, .jsp, then select scope then search.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The quickest way that I'm aware of is by using ctrl+h to bring up the Java search dialog.

share|improve this answer
1  
cmd+h hides the application on Macs ;) –  pablisco Dec 6 '12 at 10:58
1  
@pablisco edited the answer and remove cmd+h to avoid confusion –  reevesy Apr 16 at 9:56
add comment

The closest thing I know of is the Java Search, which allows you to specify searching for a method, field, class, etc. If you're in the Java or Java Browsing perspective, Ctrl+H will open the Search dialog with Java Search as the selected type.

If you want to request a feature or enhancement, enter it into Eclipse's Bugzilla. Keep in mind that the backlog of feature requests is HUGE, so the most effective way to get yours noticed is to take initiative and submit a patch.

share|improve this answer
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow. Is there a particular reason you're posting another answer? –  Qantas 94 Heavy Nov 14 '13 at 12:49
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.