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I have a dll that I'm working with, it contains a class foo.Launch. I want to create another dll that subclasses Launch. The problem is that the class name must be identical. This is used as a plugin into another piece of software and the foo.Launch class is what it looks foe to launch the plugin.

I've tried:

namespace foo
{
    public class Launch : global::foo.Launch
    {
    }
}

and

using otherfoo = foo;
namespace foo
{
    public class Launch : otherfoo.Launch
    {
    }
}

I've also tried specifying an alias in the reference properties and using that alias in my code instead of global, that also didn't work.

Neither of those methods work. Is there a way I can specify the name of the dll to look in within the using statement?

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You can't do that. If you have another class which references foo.Launch, that would be an ambiguous reference and fail to compile. –  carlosfigueira Jun 1 '12 at 15:03
    
Maybe this attribute or something like it? I'm fairly sure I've read about some kind of attribute that is used for back compt asseblies to change the external class name in the assembly. –  asawyer Jun 1 '12 at 15:04
2  
The only option may be to load the other library dynamically and use reflection to create the object and manually wrap all it's members in your own members (i.e. no true inheritance). –  Steven Doggart Jun 1 '12 at 15:06
3  
If the other piece of software is looking for specifically a foo.Launch type (and not a matching subclass), then you might be out of luck. It may be a design issue/choice on their end that they did not leave the architecture open for extensibility. –  Chris Sinclair Jun 1 '12 at 15:06
    
Are you able to change the source class? You might be able to make your life easier if you can by renaming the original class to BaseLaunch and then creating a new subclass of that called Launch. Then in your other DLL you can derive from BaseLaunch without the confusion... This does of course rely on being able to change the original dll... –  Chris Jun 1 '12 at 15:34
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You'll need to alias the original assembly and use an extern alias to reference the original assembly within the new one. Here's an example of the use of the alias.

extern alias LauncherOriginal;

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace foo
{
    public class Launcher : LauncherOriginal.foo.Launcher
    {
        ...
    }
}

Here's a walkthrough that explains how to implement that.

Also, you'd mentioned that you tried to use an alias before and encountered problems but you didn't say what they were, so if this won't work then please mention what went wrong.

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This works, my version of Resharper doesn't recognize the Alias (and shows a supposed compilation error), but it works correctly if you compile –  Sebastian Piu Jun 1 '12 at 15:44
    
Thank you, this seems to be what I was looking for. It now compiles. I'm having a different issue, but it's probably unrelated. I set the alias in the reference declaration, but I didn't realize I had to define it in my .cs file too. –  sherbang Jun 1 '12 at 15:58
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as Chris said, you can use an alias on your original assembly.

If you can't you that, then you might be able to cheat by using a 3rd assembly

Assembly1.dll (your original)

namespace foo { 
     public class Launch {}
}

Assembly2.dll (dummy)

namespace othernamespace { 
     public abstract class Dummy: foo.Launch {}
}

Assembly3.dll (your plugin)

namespace foo{ 
     public class Launch: othernamespace.Dummy{}
}

I'm not even proud of this!

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1  
I hadn't thought of the three assembly approach for if you couldn't modify the first. That is a nice evil hack. ;-) –  Chris Jun 1 '12 at 16:03
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Class name can be identical if it's defined in another namespace, but it boggles the mind why anybody would want to do that to themselves.

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The program that uses these dlls as plugins always looks for the same namespace and class name in the dll it's loading. –  sherbang Jun 1 '12 at 15:13
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Maybe you need to use extern aliases.

For example:

//in file foolaunch.cs

using System;

namespace Foo
{
    public class Launch
    {
        protected void Method1()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Hello from Foo.Launch.Method1");
        }
    }
}

// csc /target:library /out:FooLaunch.dll foolaunch.cs

//now subclassing foo.Launch

//in file subfoolaunch.cs

namespace Foo
{
    extern alias F1;
    public class Launch : F1.Foo.Launch
    {
        public void Method3()
        {
            Method1();
        }
    }
}


// csc /target:library /r:F1=foolaunch.dll /out:SubFooLaunch.dll subfoolaunch.cs

// using
// in file program.cs

namespace ConsoleApplication
{
    extern alias F2;
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var launch = new F2.Foo.Launch();
            launch.Method3();
        }
    }
}

// csc /r:FooLaunch.dll /r:F2=SubFooLaunch.dll program.cs
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